WCC R05: Anand wins with black in 35 moves

10/20/2008 – "Anand the Brave!" writes Levon Aronian in his assessment of game five of the World Championship. "Not many people would repeat the same risky line against Kramnik, but he did just that." Another sharp game ensued, and Anand gained the advantage. Kramnik faltered in a tough position and the World Champion had won a second valuable point. Full report with pictures and commentary.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

World Chess Championship in Bonn

The World Chess Championship is taking place from October 14 – November 02, 2008 in the Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany in Bonn. The match consists of twelve games, played under classical time controls: 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game plus an additional 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The prize fund is 1.5 million Euro (approximately 2.35 million US Dollars) including taxes and FIDE license fees, and is split equally between the players.

The games are being broadcast live by FoidosChess, with video and commentary for €10 per game; and on Playchess.com. Details are given at the end of this report. Games start at 15:00h CEST (=17:00h Moscow, 9 a.m. New York).


Game five: Anand wins in 35 moves

Kramnik,V (2772) - Anand,V (2783) [D49]
WCh Bonn GER (5), 20.10.2008
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6 13.0-0 Qb6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.Bxb5 Rg8 16.Bf4 Bd6 17.Bg3 f5 18.Rfc1 f4 19.Bh4 Be7 20.a4 Bxh4 21.Nxh4 Ke7 22.Ra3 Rac8 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Ra1 Qc5 25.Qg4 Qe5 26.Nf3 Qf6 27.Re1 Rc5 28.b4 Rc3 29.Nxd4 Qxd4 30.Rd1 Nf6 31.Rxd4 Nxg4 32.Rd7+ Kf6 33.Rxb7 Rc1+ 34.Bf1 Ne3 35.fxe3 fxe3 0-1. [Click to replay]

Levon Aronian's take on game five

Anand the Brave! Not many people would repeat the same risky line against Kramnik, but he did just that. And his confident approach was very well rewarded. It is a known that Anand likes spicy positions, and with less skilled opponents he walks on a tactical tightrope without fear. But to do it in the match for the greatest trophy? Did he summon the spirit of the great Mikhail Tal to aid him? There is no explanation other than that something magical or surreal is going on in Bonn. No doubt Kramnik will transform soon too. So I expect this amazing circus to continue. The most interesting show is still ahead in the program!

Score

 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
 
Anand
½
½
1
½
1
 
 
 
 
3.5
Kramnik
½
½
0
½
0
             
1.5

After his second victory in this match Vishy Anand has once again climbed to top place in the Live Ratings. This is an unofficial chess rating list that covers all players above 2700 in the FIDE rating system. Here are the top ten players in the list of October 20th 19:30h CEST.

# Player Live rating
change
games
events
born
01 Anand 2792,0
+9
5
1
1969
02 Topalov 2791,0
0
0
0
1975
03 Carlsen 2782,0
-4
3
1
1990
04 Ivanchuk 2781,9
-4,1
4
1
1969
05 Morozevich 2778,8
-8,2
11
1
1977
06 Kramnik 2763,0
-9
5
1
1975
07 Aronian 2756,3
-0,7
3
1
1982
08 Radjabov 2753,8
+2,8
2
1
1987
09 Leko 2747,0
0
0
0
1979
10 Movsesian 2744,4
+12,4
6
2
1978

Pein on Bonn

Kramnik,V (2772) - Anand,V (2783) [D49]
WCh Bonn GER (5), 20.10.2008 [Annotations by IM Malcolm Pein]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5. The sharp Meran again. Vishy is not afraid of what Kramnik might have come up with. 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6 13.0-0 Qb6 14.Qe2 Kramnik's analysis clearly came up with an improvement on game three but he is in for a surprise. 14...Bb7. Repeating the novelty in game three. 15.Bxb5








15...Rg8N. Vishy gets his novelty in first! 15...Bd6 Game three. 16.Bf4. Played quickly, and at this point Kramnik dispensed with his jacket. 16...Bd6. Also played quickly. Now Kramnik has a problem, Vishy has shown he has two ways to play this position and he is still in his preparation. Once again Kramnik has been out-prepared. Although he gets a perfectly good position, Kramnik used 45 minutes on move 18 and was soon in time pressure. 17.Bg3 f5! Seeking to prise open the g file. 17...Bxg3 18.hxg3 has the opposite effect.








18.Rfc1. After the game Kramnik said he preferred this to 18.Rd1 because he was already concerned about the possibility of Qc5-d5. I think he may also have reasonably assumed that Vishy had prepared for 18.Rd1. 18...f4. In the VIP room Yusupov, Norwood and Pein (in pecking order) were having fun with 18...Ke7 19.Nxd4 Qxd4 20.Rd1 Rxg3 21.Rxd4 Rxg2+ 22.Kf1 Rag8 23.Qd2 Bf3 but 24.Ke1! spoilt all the fun. 19.Bh4 Be7 20.a4 Bxh4 21.Nxh4. Now Qd6 to try and play Qd5 was possible but Ke7 has to be played at some point. Suddenly Kramnik has to reckon with Rxg2+. However he is still absolutely fine. 21...Ke7








22.Ra3. Not 22.b4 Rxg2+! 23.Nxg2 Rg8 24.f3 d3+ 25.Qf2 Bxf3 26.Qxb6 Rxg2+ 27.Kf1 Nxb6 28.Bxd3 Nd5 With threats of Nxb4 Rxh2 and Ne3; However 22.Qh5 Qd6 (22...Nf6 23.Qe5!) 23.Bxd7 Qxd7 24.f3 suggested by the computers is hard to refute. f3 looks anti positional but Qe5 is coming. Indeed the human 24.Qe5 in this line is not bad. I can't wholly trust this but 22.Qh5 crudely threatens Bxd7 One interesting line is 24...Rac8 25.Rxc8 Rxc8 26.Re1 Rc2 27.Qg5+ Kf8 28.Nf5 exf5 29.Qf6 Kg8 30.Re7 Rc1+ 31.Kf2 Rc2+ 32.Ke1 Rc1+ 33.Kd2+/-. 22...Rac8 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Ra1 Qc5 25.Qg4 Qe5! Strongly centralising. 26.Nf3








26...Qf6! 26...Bxf3 27.Qxf3+/= Nf6 28.Bd3. 27.Re1. 27.Bxd7 Kxd7 28.Nxd4 Ke7! with compensation in the form of a beautiful bishop 29.Rd1 Rc4 30.Ne2 Rxa4; 27.Rd1 Ne5 28.Nxe5 Qxe5 29.Qh4+ Qf6 30.Qxf6+ Kxf6 is better for Black has Rxd4 loses to Rc1+ and Black plays e6-e5 and Rc2. 27...Rc5. 27...Nf8!? Yusupov. 28.b4?! Rc3. Now Black is better. Kramnik is losing control and misses a tactic. 29.Nxd4?? Qxd4 30.Rd1 Nf6 31.Rxd4 Nxg4 32.Rd7+ Kf6 33.Rxb7 Rc1+ 34.Bf1 Ne3!! 35.fxe3 fxe3








Vishy has outprepared Vlad again and he is playing more quickly and accurately. Kramnik was asked the screamingly obvious question: "/portals/all/_for_legal_reasons.jpg" he said "it could be better". His calm and polite demeanour at the press conference did him great credit. 0-1. [Click to replay]


Picture gallery


The ritual: Vladimir Kramnik meticulously adjusts his pieces, while Anand and the arbiter wait


With the pieces just right Kramnik can play his first move: 1.d4


Anand calmly repeats the opening from game three


When will the novelty come? Kramnik playing 6.Bd3


Anand plays 10...cxd4


Kramnik plays 14.Qe2...


...to which Anand replies with 14...Bb7, repeating his novelty from game three


The game after 17...f5. Kramnik has used 51 minutes, Anand seven minutes


Wasn't I supposed to out-prepare him? Kramnik brooding after an Anand novelty


The game is almost over, after Kramnik's 34th move


Kramnik knows it is all over, Anand watches his opponent before playing the killer: 34...Ne3


Anand has played 34...Ne3 and left the stage, Kramnik contemplates the situation


Anand plays his final move, 35...fxe3, after which Kramnik resigns (no, we did not catch the handshake)


The press conference after game five, with Kramnik, GM Klaus Bischoff, Anand and the Evonik-Gazprom girls


A visibly distraught Vladimir Kramnik answers first questions from the journalists


With a two-point lead after a fine black-pieces victory: World Champion Vishy Anand


Live broadcast

The games are being broadcast live by FoidosChess, which provides five parallel video streams to present the players and commentary by grandmasters in German, English, Spanish and Russian. The cost is €10 per game. The games are also being broadcast live on Playchess.com (without videos and commentary, but also without time delay).


If you are not a member you can download ChessBase Light, which gives you immediate access. You can also use the program to read, replay and analyse PGN games. Owners of Fritz 11 or Rybka 3 automatically get a full year's subscription to Playchess.

You can also use all these programs to read, replay and analyse the PGN games.

Links


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register