US Champ R3: Sevian defeats Top Ten

4/3/2015 – The round was wild for all sides, and all boards, but the news of the round, without question, was 14-year-old Samuel Sevian's defeat of World no.8 Wesley So, who resigned just short of getting mated. This was hardly the only surprise as Nakamura let Kamsky escape after squeezing him the entire game, while Irina Krush was on the wrong side of a massive attack by Paikidze. Nakamura-So tomorrow!

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The 2015 U.S. Championship is an elite national championship event, featuring 12 of the strongest chess players in America. Over the course of eleven rounds, these competitors will battle for $175,000 in prize money, qualification into the World Championship cycle, and the coveted title of 2015 U.S. Champion.

U.S. Chess Championship - Round Three

Table White Score Rating Black Score Rating Result
1 GM Onischuk, Alexander 1.0 2665 GM Troff, Kayden W 1.0 2532 ½-½
2 GM Holt, Conrad 1.0 2530 GM Robson, Ray 1.5 2656 0-1
3 GM Akobian, Varuzhan 1.0 2622 GM Gareev, Timur 0.5 2604 ½-½
4 GM Kamsky, Gata 1.0 2683 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 2.0 2798 ½-½
5 GM So, Wesley 2.0 2788 GM Sevian, Samuel 0.5 2531 0-1
6 GM Naroditsky, Daniel 0.0 2633 GM Shankland, Samuel L 0.5 2661 ½-½

What an amazing round! Last minute blunders, excellent preparations, big turn around. Every round in the U.S. Championship gets better and better!

The Kingside Diner is now a restaurant that belongs to the Chess Club

Onischuk, Alexander ½-½ Troff, Kayden
A game that is extremely difficult to understand. Onischuk popped an absolutely beautiful tactic (19.Nd4!!) and obtained a crushing position. His passed pawn on d7 gave him an easily winning advantage. Black was crushed, basically in a resignable position. White had several ways of winning, both trying to push the pawn to d8 ripping apart the blockade. Also perfectly possible was to go after the weakened black king and try to checkmate it, but Onischuk managed to do neither. Troff pulled a complete miracle and somehow survived after perhaps one of Onischuk's worst games in the last many years.

Alexander Onischuk was visibly upset after his game

Holt, Conrad 0-1 Robson, Ray
Excellent preparation, understanding and calculation from Ray Robson!

Robson chilling with the audience after a great game

[Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3.3"] [White "Holt, Conrad"] [Black "Robson, Ray"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D97"] [WhiteElo "2530"] [BlackElo "2656"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2015.04.01"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 a6 8. e5 b5 9. Qb3 Nfd7 10. Ng5 c5 $1 {A fantastic novelty! Holt had played the move Ng5 before against Lisa Schut last year, and Robson must have seen this move and prepared this move. As he explained after the game, Ng5 is supposed to tactically stop c5, but he played it anyways!} 11. e6 (11. Nxf7 Rxf7 12. e6 Nc6 $1 13. exf7+ Kf8 $13) 11... cxd4 12. Nce4 Nf6 13. exf7+ Kh8 14. Bd3 (14. h4 { was pointed out by Robson as the main line, and probably the best move.}) 14... Nc6 15. h4 Ne5 $1 {Played after a 30 minute think, and a perfect evaluation of the position.} 16. h5 $1 gxh5 $1 {A wonderful idea! Black ruins his pawn structure but slows down White's attack.} 17. Bf4 $2 (17. Nxf6 exf6 18. Rxh5 h6 {forced but sufficient.} 19. Nf3 Bg4 20. Rh4 Nxf3+ $1 21. gxf3 Qe7+ $1 22. Kf1 f5 $8) 17... Nxd3+ 18. Qxd3 Bf5 $19 {Black has consolidated his position and his extra pawn is simply giving him a decisive advantage. Also f7 is going to drop.} 19. g4 Nxe4 20. gxf5 Nxg5 21. Bxg5 Qd5 22. Kd2 Qxf7 23. Rae1 Qxf5 24. Rxh5 Qxd3+ 25. Kxd3 Rf3+ 26. Ke2 Raf8 27. Bxe7 Rxf2+ 28. Kd3 R8f3+ 29. Ke4 Rf7 30. Kd5 d3 31. Bb4 d2 32. Rd1 Bxb2 33. Rg5 h6 34. Rh5 Kh7 35. Ke6 R2f6+ 36. Kd5 Rd7+ 0-1

Akobian, Varuzhan ½-½ Gareev, Timur
The game had an interesting start, with 1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 h6!?!? 3.e4 g5!?. Unfortunately it was not very interesting after that. The position became some kind of Benoni structure that was eventually drawn.

Timur Gareev took the business casual attire very much on the casual side

Kamsky, Gata ½-½ Nakamura, Hikaru
Miracles happen!

[Event "U.S. Championship 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Kamsky, Gata"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A46"] [WhiteElo "2680"] [BlackElo "2798"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "120"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] {This battle between two of the usual heavyweights is always highly anticipated.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 {Kamsky opts for his trusty London system.} c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 d5 6. Nbd2 Bd6 7. Bg3 O-O 8. Bd3 b6 9. e4 $5 {It is unusual to play this break before castling.} (9. Ne5 {is the main move here, which Kamsky has played before.}) 9... Be7 {I like this reaction by Hikaru, keeping his bishop and ensuring a more double-edged fight.} 10. e5 Nh5 11. O-O Bd7 {Black is in no rush to capture on g3.} 12. Re1 Rc8 13. a3 Nxg3 14. hxg3 f5 {I like this move, shutting down the bishop unless White wants to open the bishop for black's pieces.} 15. dxc5 $5 (15. exf6 Bxf6 {looks great for Black.} ) (15. b4 {would be my choice, and is the logical follow up to a3.}) 15... bxc5 16. b4 g5 {Hikaru tries to make life uncomfortable for the f3 knight.} 17. Nh2 {This move is highly counterintuitive.} (17. bxc5 {was what I expected during the game, securing the d4 square for the knight. I'm curious why Gata rejected it.}) 17... d4 18. b5 dxc3 19. bxc6 cxd2 20. Re2 Bxc6 21. Rxd2 (21. Bc4 $1 {is more precise, preventing the pawn from reaching this square.}) 21... Bd5 22. g4 $2 {White allows c4 without a fight.} (22. Bc4 Bxc4 (22... Qc7 {is playable, but then White would certainly have played this move.}) 23. Rxd8 Rfxd8 {is what I thought Hikaru's idea might be, but I'm not sure it is so clear after} 24. Qa4) 22... c4 23. Bc2 f4 {Now White really is up against it.} 24. Qe2 Qa5 25. Nf3 Rcd8 (25... Rfd8 {looks far more natural. I'm sure there is a concrete reason Hikaru preferred the other rook, but I don't see it.}) 26. Rdd1 Rd7 27. a4 Rfd8 28. Rab1 a6 {There is no reason to allow Rb5.} 29. Rdc1 Ba3 30. Rd1 ( 30. Nxg5 Bxc1 31. Rxc1 c3 {and White just can't make any threats.}) 30... h6 31. Kh2 Bf8 {Now Black's kingside is completely secure.} 32. Rdc1 Qc5 33. Kg1 Qc6 (33... Bxf3 {Hikaru was understandably reluctant to give up his bishop, but this looks very strong.} 34. Qxf3 Rd2 {and with f2 under pressure and e5 falling, White's position looks lost.}) 34. Rd1 Bg7 {I'm not sure I care for the bishop here.} (34... Bc5 {looks a bit more menacing.}) 35. Nd4 (35. a5 { was annoying, threatening Rb6, and if} Qc5 36. Be4 {gives White a little counterplay.}) 35... Qc7 36. Nf3 {There was some time trouble around here, so there is some repeating.} Rb8 (36... Bf8 {Black had a chance to swing the bishop around again.}) 37. Rxb8+ Qxb8 38. Be4 $1 {Gata of course doesn't miss his chance for this move.} Qc8 39. Bc2 $6 {But this one I don't get.} (39. Bxd5 Rxd5 40. Rc1 {and with the bishop on g7 out of the game and Black's king a little open I think White has good chances to hold.}) 39... Qc6 40. Nd4 Qc7 41. Nf3 Rd8 42. Bb1 Rb8 43. Bc2 (43. Be4 $1) 43... a5 44. Rc1 Qb7 45. Qd1 Qa8 {As is often the case, I'm not sure what Hikaru is up to. It looks like he's been futzing around, but there is usually a subtle point to these moves. In this case, I think he wants to avoid Be4 while not running into Nd4.} 46. Qe2 Rb4 47. Rd1 Qc6 48. Nd4 Qc7 49. Re1 Qb7 50. Rd1 Bf8 {Hikaru is making some progress.} (50... Bxg2 51. f3 {is not recommended.}) 51. Nb5 {Gata decides that he's done with waiting, so he complicates the game.} (51. Kh2 {A waiting move might be objectively stronger, but after} Rb2 {and Bc5 coming it is clear White will be facing real problems.}) 51... Bxg2 52. Rd8 Bh1 {It looks like White is busted.} 53. Qf1 Rb2 54. Nd6 Qd5 55. Nf7 {Gata plays his last chance.} Rxc2 $2 (55... Qc6 56. Bg6 (56. Nxh6+ Kg7 {doesn't help White.}) 56... Be4 { and White's pieces just can't do a lot.}) 56. Rxd5 Bxd5 57. Qb1 $1 {The only move, and now Hikaru has to sac another exchange.} Kxf7 (57... Be4 58. Nd6 {is possibly what Hikaru missed, and actually White is the one who wins.}) 58. Qxc2 Kg7 59. Qd2 Bb4 60. Qd4 c3 {Neither side can make progress, so they agreed to a draw. Nakamura really outplayed Kamsky this game, but Gata defended stubbornly as he always does and one mistake was enough to throw it away.} 1/2-1/2

What a game! Kamsky mentioned that he felt lost most of the game,
but finally felt that after Qb1 he could not lose the game.

So, Wesley 0-1 Sevian, Samuel
Without a doubt the game of the day!

[Event "U.S. Championship 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Sevian, Samuel"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D45"] [WhiteElo "2788"] [BlackElo "2548"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "82"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] {The battle of Young vs. Younger.} 1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 c6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 {Sam shows he's not afraid to enter the sharpest lines against the world's best.} 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Bd3 Bb7 11. a3 Rc8 12. Ng5 {An ambitious move, famously used by Aronian in h is spectactular loss to Anand. There is no doubt that both players are aware of this game.} (12. b4 { was the main line, but it has been shown that Black can in fact play} c5 $1 { anyway.}) 12... c5 {Sevian plays Anand's move. Usually a safe bet.} 13. Bxh7+ { Wesley's new move.} (13. Nxh7 {as played by Aronian was punished spectacularly by Anand.} Ng4 14. f4 cxd4 15. exd4 Bc5 $3 16. Be2 Nde5 $1 17. Bxg4 Bxd4+ 18. Kh1 Nxg4 19. Nxf8 f5 20. Ng6 Qf6 21. h3 Qxg6 22. Qe2 Qh5 23. Qd3 Be3 {0-1 (23) Aronian,L (2802)-Anand,V (2772) Wijk aan Zee 2013 CBM 153 [Anand, V]}) 13... Kh8 14. f4 g6 {I'd be scared to play this move, but kids often have nerves of titanium. To be fair, I really have no idea what I'd play instead.} 15. Bxg6 fxg6 16. Nxb5 {Thus far Sam has used far more time than Wesley, and here he slips up.} Qe7 $2 (16... Bb8 {first was necessary, and Qe7 next move.}) 17. Qxg6 $2 {Wesley lets him off the hook.} (17. Nxd6 Qxd6 18. Qxg6 {is monstrous for White, with e4-Rf3-Rh3 nearlly impossible to stop.}) 17... Bb8 { Now we are back in less clear territory, with both players on their own.} 18. dxc5 (18. Bd2 {The computer likes this simple developing move, and as much as I hate to agree with machines, it looks very natural.}) 18... Rxc5 (18... Nxc5 {was a viable alternative, after which I still like} 19. Bd2) 19. Nd4 Rg8 ( 19... Nh7 {is slightly better, as there is no reason to provoke the queen to h6.}) 20. Qh6+ Nh7 21. e4 (21. h4 {I like this move better, mainly cause it ensures the g-file will stay closed}) 21... Ndf6 22. b4 Rcxg5 $1 {Sam correctly sacrifices the exchange.} 23. fxg5 {Note how if Wesley played h4 this sac would be far less annoying.} Be5 (23... Ng4 {immediately is recommended by the computer, with the idea that} 24. Bb2 Be5 {transposes to the game.}) 24. Bb2 {I'd give this a question mark, but it's hard to assign them to such natural moves in a crazy position.} (24. Nb3 $1 {was actually much stronger, keeping g5 securing and inviting Black to grab on a1, which would weaken his dark squares.} Bxe4 (24... Bxa1 25. Nxa1 {can hardly be recommended, given the king on h8 on the open diagonal.}) 25. Ra2 Ng4 26. Qh5 Bxh2+ 27. Kh1 {and Black's king is far looser than White's.}) 24... Ng4 25. Qh5 $2 {This one maybe deserves two, however. Even the best players in the world have their off moments, although it is unclear what exactly Wesley missed here. Sam doesn't miss his chance.} (25. Qh3 {immediately was necessary, and while the situation is still far from clear, White is still the one on top.}) 25... Qxg5 (25... Rxg5 26. Rf7 {would not be recommended for Black, and perhaps was So was hoping for.}) 26. Qh3 (26. Qxg5 Nxg5 {and Black's pieces are just massive.}) 26... Qe3+ (26... Qd2 {might be even stronger, but Sevian's way works as well.}) 27. Qxe3 Nxe3 28. Rf2 {Not the best defense, but White's position was hopeless anyway.} Ng5 $1 {With pieces like this, White's prospects are slim. Sam doesn't let him off the hook from here.} 29. Kh1 Nc4 ( 29... Nxe4 {was immediately over, with the idea that} 30. Re2 Rxg2 $1 {leads to mate.} 31. Rxg2 Nf2+ 32. Kg1 Nh3+ 33. Kh1 Bxg2#) 30. Bc3 Nxe4 31. Rf7 (31. Rf3 $1 {was one last trick, with the idea that on} Nxc3 32. Rh3+ Kg7 33. Rxc3 { d4 shouldn't be taken due to} Bxd4 $2 (33... Kf6 $1 {is still winning.}) 34. Rg3+ Kh7 35. Rh3+ Kg7 36. Rg3+ {with a draw, and if} Kf7 37. Rf1+ {Black is even worse.}) 31... Nxc3 32. Rxb7 Bxd4 {Black's clump of pieces dominate the board.} 33. Rf1 Rg7 34. Rb8+ Kh7 35. g3 e5 36. Rff8 Ne3 37. h4 Ne4 38. Rh8+ Kg6 39. h5+ Kg5 40. h6 {The pawn is getting far, but White's king is in far too much danger.} Rf7 41. h7 Rf1+ {and with mate coming soon, White resigned. Wesley will definitely be disappointed with his missed chances this game, but Sam outcalculated his elite opponent from a difficult position.} 0-1

Wesley So was pleasant and in good spirits even after his loss, saying that the opening choice was probably not good as his preparation was not good enough to play such a sharp line. He gave a short interview with Maurice Ashley after the game. His sportsmanship is incredibly high!

Wesley So resigns to Samuel Sevian, and the players sign the scoresheets. At age 14 years
and three months, Sevian is probably the youngest player ever to beat a Top Ten player at
standard time control.

Maurice Ashely quips, "The man of the hour! Except he's only fourteen."

Naroditsky, Daniel ½-½ Shankland, Sam
Another fascinating game. It might make game of the day if there hadn't been three other fabulous games to look at. A complicated Grunfeld ended in an exciting perpetual. It is definitely a game worth reviewing.

Shankland came to the commentary room after the game, and admitted that he was worried through most of the game about being checkmated, but the computer said that both him and Naroditsky played a fantastic game in a very sharp position.

Pairings Round Four

The absolute highlight of the tournament! Hikaru Nakamura vs. Weslsey So showdown will be tomorrow! Make sure not to miss the action on the official website or www.playchess.com

Table White Score Rating Black Score Rating Result
1 GM Troff, Kayden W 1.5 2532 GM Shankland, Samuel L 1.0 2661  
2 GM Sevian, Samuel 1.5 2531 GM Naroditsky, Daniel 0.5 2633  
3 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 2.5 2798 GM So, Wesley 2.0 2788  
4 GM Gareev, Timur 1.0 2604 GM Kamsky, Gata 1.5 2683  
5 GM Robson, Ray 2.5 2656 GM Akobian, Varuzhan 1.5 2622  
6 GM Onischuk, Alexander 1.5 2665 GM Holt, Conrad 1.0 2530

Round three games

[Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Kamsky, G."] [Black "Nakamura, Hi"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A46"] [WhiteElo "2683"] [BlackElo "2798"] [PlyCount "120"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 d5 6. Nbd2 Bd6 7. Bg3 O-O 8. Bd3 b6 9. e4 Be7 10. e5 Nh5 11. O-O Bd7 12. Re1 Rc8 13. a3 Nxg3 14. hxg3 f5 15. dxc5 bxc5 16. b4 g5 17. Nh2 d4 18. b5 dxc3 19. bxc6 cxd2 20. Re2 Bxc6 21. Rxd2 Bd5 22. g4 c4 23. Bc2 f4 24. Qe2 Qa5 25. Nf3 Rcd8 26. Rdd1 Rd7 27. a4 Rfd8 28. Rab1 a6 29. Rdc1 Ba3 30. Rd1 h6 31. Kh2 Bf8 32. Rdc1 Qc5 33. Kg1 Qc6 34. Rd1 Bg7 35. Nd4 Qc7 36. Nf3 Rb8 37. Rxb8+ Qxb8 38. Be4 Qc8 39. Bc2 Qc6 40. Nd4 Qc7 41. Nf3 Rd8 42. Bb1 Rb8 43. Bc2 a5 44. Rc1 Qb7 45. Qd1 Qa8 46. Qe2 Rb4 47. Rd1 Qc6 48. Nd4 Qc7 49. Re1 Qb7 50. Rd1 Bf8 51. Nb5 Bxg2 52. Rd8 Bh1 53. Qf1 Rb2 54. Nd6 Qd5 55. Nf7 Rxc2 56. Rxd5 Bxd5 57. Qb1 Kxf7 58. Qxc2 Kg7 59. Qd2 Bb4 60. Qd4 c3 1/2-1/2 [Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "So, W."] [Black "Sevian, Samuel"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D45"] [WhiteElo "2788"] [BlackElo "2531"] [PlyCount "82"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 c6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Bd3 Bb7 11. a3 Rc8 12. Ng5 c5 13. Bxh7+ Kh8 14. f4 g6 15. Bxg6 fxg6 16. Nxb5 Qe7 17. Qxg6 Bb8 18. dxc5 Rxc5 19. Nd4 Rg8 20. Qh6+ Nh7 21. e4 Ndf6 22. b4 Rcxg5 23. fxg5 Be5 24. Bb2 Ng4 25. Qh5 Qxg5 26. Qh3 Qe3+ 27. Qxe3 Nxe3 28. Rf2 Ng5 29. Kh1 Nc4 30. Bc3 Nxe4 31. Rf7 Nxc3 32. Rxb7 Bxd4 33. Rf1 Rg7 34. Rb8+ Kh7 35. g3 e5 36. Rff8 Ne3 37. h4 Ne4 38. Rh8+ Kg6 39. h5+ Kg5 40. h6 Rf7 41. h7 Rf1+ 0-1 [Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Holt, C."] [Black "Robson, R."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D97"] [WhiteElo "2530"] [BlackElo "2656"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 a6 8. e5 b5 9. Qb3 Nfd7 10. Ng5 c5 11. e6 cxd4 12. Nce4 Nf6 13. exf7+ Kh8 14. Bd3 Nc6 15. h4 Ne5 16. h5 gxh5 17. Bf4 Nxd3+ 18. Qxd3 Bf5 19. g4 Nxe4 20. gxf5 Nxg5 21. Bxg5 Qd5 22. Kd2 Qxf7 23. Rae1 Qxf5 24. Rxh5 Qxd3+ 25. Kxd3 Rf3+ 26. Ke2 Raf8 27. Bxe7 Rxf2+ 28. Kd3 R8f3+ 29. Ke4 Rf7 30. Kd5 d3 31. Bb4 d2 32. Rd1 Bxb2 33. Rg5 h6 34. Rh5 Kh7 35. Ke6 R2f6+ 36. Kd5 Rd7+ 0-1 [Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Onischuk, Al"] [Black "Troff, Kayden W"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D85"] [WhiteElo "2665"] [BlackElo "2532"] [PlyCount "116"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 c5 8. Be3 Qa5 9. Qd2 O-O 10. Rc1 Rd8 11. d5 e6 12. Bg5 f6 13. Be3 Nc6 14. Bd3 b6 15. O-O Ba6 16. Be2 Qa4 17. Rfd1 Bc4 18. Bxc4 Qxc4 19. Nd4 Nxd4 20. cxd4 Qa4 21. dxc5 Qxe4 22. d6 bxc5 23. d7 Bf8 24. Bxc5 Rab8 25. Bxf8 Kxf8 26. h3 Qb4 27. Qh6+ Kg8 28. Qe3 Qb6 29. Qe4 e5 30. Rc6 Qb5 31. Qc2 Kg7 32. Rc8 Qb7 33. Rxb8 Qxb8 34. Qc5 Kf7 35. Qc4+ Ke7 36. Qc5+ Ke6 37. Qd5+ Ke7 38. f4 exf4 39. Re1+ Kf8 40. Re6 Kg7 41. Qd4 Qb1+ 42. Kh2 Qf5 43. Re7+ Kh6 44. Qxa7 Qg5 45. Qd4 Qg3+ 46. Kg1 f3 47. Qf2 Qg5 48. h4 Qf4 49. gxf3 f5 50. Kg2 Qd6 51. Qe3+ f4 52. Re6 Qc7 53. Qe5 Qxe5 54. Rxe5 Rxd7 55. a4 Rd3 56. Re7 Ra3 57. Ra7 g5 58. hxg5+ Kxg5 1/2-1/2 [Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Akobian, V."] [Black "Gareev, T."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A41"] [WhiteElo "2622"] [BlackElo "2604"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 d6 2. Nf3 h6 3. e4 g5 4. Bc4 Bg7 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. d5 Ne5 7. Nxe5 Bxe5 8. h4 g4 9. Be3 c5 10. Qd2 Nf6 11. Bf4 Bd4 12. Be3 Be5 13. Bf4 Bd4 14. Bd3 Qb6 15. Rb1 Nh5 16. Be3 g3 17. O-O Bd7 18. Bxd4 cxd4 19. Ne2 gxf2+ 20. Rxf2 Nf6 21. Rxf6 exf6 22. Qf4 O-O-O 23. Qxf6 Rhg8 24. Qxd4 Qxd4+ 25. Nxd4 Rg4 26. Rf1 Rdg8 27. Rf2 Rxh4 28. Rxf7 Bh3 29. Bf1 Bd7 30. Nf5 Bxf5 31. exf5 Rf4 32. Bd3 Rfg4 33. Bf1 Rf4 34. Bd3 Rfg4 35. Bf1 1/2-1/2 [Event "ch-USA 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Naroditsky, D."] [Black "Shankland, S."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D85"] [WhiteElo "2633"] [BlackElo "2661"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Rb1 O-O 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qa5+ 11. Bd2 Qxa2 12. O-O b6 13. Qc1 Bb7 14. Bc4 Qa4 15. Bb5 Qa2 16. Bc4 Qa4 17. Bb5 Qa2 18. Re1 Rc8 19. Qd1 Rc2 20. Bd3 Rc8 21. h4 Qe6 22. h5 Qg4 23. hxg6 hxg6 24. Qb3 Nc6 25. Bc4 Nxd4 26. Bxf7+ Kh7 27. Nxd4 Bxd4 28. Be6 Qh4 29. Bxc8 Qxf2+ 30. Kh1 Bxc8 31. Be3 Qh4+ 32. Kg1 Be5 33. Qf7+ Kh8 34. Qf8+ Kh7 35. Qf7+ Kh8 36. Qf8+ Kh7 37. Qf7+ 1/2-1/2

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Standings

U.S. Women's Championship - Round Three

Table White Score Rating Black Score Rating
Result
1 WGM Abrahamyan, Tatev 0.0 2322 WCM Virkud, Apurva 1.0 2132
1-0
2 WFM Yu, Jennifer R 0.0 2180 FM Melekhina, Alisa 0.0 2235
½-½
3 WGM Nemcova, Katerina 0.5 2279 WIM Wang, Annie 1.0 1901
1-0
4 WGM Foisor, Sabina-Francesca 0.5 2276 WGM Sharevich, Anna 1.0 2267
1-0
5 WIM Ni, Viktorija 0.5 2188 IM Goletiani, Rusudan 0.5 2311
0-1
6 IM Paikidze, Nazi 0.5 2333 GM Krush, Irina 0.5 2477
1-0

Abrahamyan, Tatev 1-0 Virkud, Apurva
Coming back from two losses to start the tournament, one of the favorites of the tournament - Tatev Abrahamyan - absolutely crushed her opponent in a sharp Najdorf. A good learning experience for the teenage player.

An important victory for Tatev Abrahamyan, getting much needed confidence back

Yu, Jennifer ½-½ Melekhina, Alisa
An interesting English with many positional concepts. Both players handled it relatively well, but Melekhina just played it a bit more precisely. She got a slight edge, but it was never too big. Yu was able to hold the draw.

Jennifer Yu starts with 50% in her first championship

Nemcova, Katerina 1-0 Wang, Annie

[Event "U.S. Womens Championship 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Nemcova, Katerina"] [Black "Wang, Annie"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C01"] [WhiteElo "2279"] [BlackElo "1901"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] {Nemcova, who won possibly the nicest game of the tournament yesterday, continues her upward trend.} 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 {No, she isn't playing for a draw folks. I'm guessing she's trying to avoid her young opponent's preparation and get a position where she can just play chess.} exd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bd3 Bd6 6. O-O O-O 7. h3 h6 8. c4 {White breaks the symmetry by aiming for an isolated pawn position.} dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nbd7 10. Nc3 Nb6 11. Bb3 c6 {This looks like a very reasonable move, but I think it is slightly inaccurate.} ( 11... Re8 {looks more precise, preparing Be6 next move.}) 12. Ne5 Nbd5 13. Re1 (13. Nxd5 Nxd5 14. Qd3 {with Bc2 ideas might disturb Black a little more.}) 13... Be6 {Now Black is very solid again.} 14. Qf3 Re8 15. Nxd5 Nxd5 16. Bd2 a5 17. a4 (17. a3 {I slightly prefer this move, as I don't see a reason to give away the b4 square.}) 17... Be7 18. Rad1 Bg5 19. Qg3 Bh4 {I'm not sure I undestand this move.} (19... Bxd2 20. Rxd2 Qb6 {looks simple and annoying for White to deal with. Note how a4 looks really out of place.}) 20. Qf3 (20. Qd3 { with Bc2 ideas gives White some play.}) 20... Qf6 21. Re4 Qxf3 22. Nxf3 Be7 { Black should be extremely solid in this ending, not worse at the very least.} 23. Rde1 Kf8 {An awkward move, although by itself it isn't so bad.} (23... Red8 24. Ne5 Bb4 25. Bxb4 axb4 {looks pleasant for Black.}) 24. Ne5 Red8 {White plays a completely natural move, but it allows some tactics.} (24... Bf6 {was still solid.}) 25. Nxf7 {flashy, although maybe 2nd best.} (25. Ng6+ fxg6 26. Rxe6 {is more boring, but collecting the bishops looks slightly better. Even so, after} Bf6 {Black isnt' doing too badly.}) 25... Bxf7 26. Bxd5 {Here Black panicked, however.} Rxd5 $2 ({after the calm} 26... Bf6 {Black is completely fine.}) 27. Rxe7 {Now Black's position is extremely dangerous due to White's active pieces in addition to the extra pawn.} b5 28. Rc7 Rxd4 $2 {I'd be slightly too terrified to play this move.} (28... Re8 {would be my choice, at least eliminating a pair of rooks and hoping to hold a pawn-down opposite bishop position.}) 29. Ree7 $1 {Of course White won't decline the invitation to the 7th.} Bd5 (29... Rxd2 {doesn't help matters.} 30. Rxf7+ Kg8 31. Rxg7+ Kh8 {and the rooks are devastating, and after a move like} 32. f4 {threatening f5-f6 Black can almost resign.}) 30. Bc3 {Two rooks and a bishop are a powerful attacking force.} Re4 31. Rxg7 b4 32. Bd2 (32. Bf6 {was even stronger, with the idea that if} Rf4 33. Rg6 {and with Rxh6 coming in addition to mating threats Black is in no position to stop.}) 32... Re6 (32... Rc8 $1 {was the best defense, trying desperately to trade off one of the rooks.} 33. Ra7 Ra8 34. Bxh6 {should be good enough, but will require some technique.}) 33. Be3 { Now the end is inevitable.} Rf6 34. Bc5+ Ke8 35. Rce7+ Kd8 36. Bb6+ {and White didn't wait for Re8 mate next move. Nemcova plays another nice game, once again taking advantage of just a couple of errors by her opponent.} 1-0

Katerina Nemcova is tied for first with 2.5/3

Foisor, Sabina 1-0 Sharevich, Anna
Foisor obtained a very nice position from her London set up. Sharevich found herself in a bad position as her light-squared bishop was not as strong as White's knight, and Foisor slowly but surely improved her position until she won.

Anna Sharevich was unable to keep up positionally with her opponent

Ni, Viktorja 0-1 Goletiani, Rusudan
An almost ridiculous game from White, where basically every move she played was bad. She was appropiately squashed positionally and tactically.

Paikidze, Nazi 1-0 Krush, Irina
A fabulous attack by the newcomer from Georgia to the American federation, beating the reigning US Champion!

[Event "U.S. Womens Championship 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Paikidze, Nazi"] [Black "Krush, Irina"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A06"] [WhiteElo "2333"] [BlackElo "2477"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] {One of the tournament's new arrivals makes her presence felt with this victory.} 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Bg4 3. Bg2 Nd7 4. d3 e6 5. Nbd2 {There are many move order choices for both sides in the King's Indian Attack. All are quite playable, and it is more a matter of taste than objective value.} Bd6 6. O-O Ne7 (6... Ngf6 7. e4 {and Black's pieces aren't quite arranged properly, since the e5 threat will be annnoying.}) 7. b3 {Instead of immediately challenging the center, Nazi prefers to finish her development.} O-O 8. Bb2 c5 9. c4 Nc6 10. a3 Re8 11. Qc2 d4 {Black transposes to a reverse benoni.} 12. e3 (12. b4 { I'd try to play this move immediately, before Black has the chance to shore up the center with e5. Now after} e5 13. Ne4 Bf8 {White has a choice between b5 and taking on c5, both with good counterplay.}) 12... e5 13. Rae1 (13. exd4 exd4 (13... cxd4 {is possible too of course, but White gets in} 14. b4 {which gives White some breathing room.}) 14. b4 {would still be my preference.}) 13... a5 {Now White's position is very cramped.} 14. exd4 cxd4 15. Ne4 Be7 16. h3 Be6 {This retreat allows some tactics.} (16... Bf5 17. g4 Bg6 {and the bishop is much more solid here.}) 17. Bc1 {a logical improving move, but White had an interesting possibility.} (17. Nxe5 $5 Ndxe5 18. f4 {is a surprising tactic, which eliminates one of Black's key central pawns. If the knight retreats, f5 will win the bishop. Perhaps Black should try to break up White's pawns with} a4 $5 19. fxe5 axb3 20. Qxb3 Nxe5 {with an unclear game.}) 17... h6 18. g4 {Nazi realizes that she needs to play aggressively to justify her lack of space.} Nf8 19. g5 $1 {An excellent decision, stirring up trouble before Black covers the dark squares with Ng6.} h5 $6 {This looks logical, trying to keep things closed, but it runs into a familar tactical idea.} (19... Qd7 { simply ignoring the pawn may be best, but it's not easy to play this way.} 20. gxh6 Bxh3 21. Qd1 {with a mess.}) 20. Nxe5 $1 {Nazi doesn't let this chance pass.} Nxe5 21. f4 Qd7 $6 (21... Nxc4 22. bxc4 Qd7 {looks slightly safer, keeping the f-file closed.}) 22. fxe5 Bxh3 $2 (22... Ng6 {was much safer.}) 23. Qf2 {Now Black has real problems.} Be6 24. Bf3 {This is simple and strong, although not best.} (24. Nf6+ $1 {was a sweet shot.} gxf6 25. gxf6 Bc5 26. Qg3+ Ng6 27. Be4 {and Black will be unable to stop White from crashing through with Bxg6.}) 24... Bg4 (24... g6 {is ugly, but it isn't clear how White will break through.}) 25. Ng3 Nh7 {Not the best defense, but Irina was in time pressure and even without that the position is extremely difficult to defend.} (25... Bc5 26. Bd5 Ne6 {holds things together, although after} 27. Ne4 {Black still faces an uphill battle.}) 26. Bxg4 (26. g6 $1 {is immediately crushing, although what Nazi played is quite strong also.} fxg6 27. e6 $1 Qc7 28. Bxg4 hxg4 29. Qf7+ Kh8 30. Kg2 {and Black will get mated on the h-file.}) 26... Qxg4 27. Re4 $6 {This makes her life harder.} (27. Qxf7+ Kh8 28. Kh2 {is simply lost.}) 27... Qe6 28. Nxh5 Bxg5 29. Bxg5 Nxg5 30. Qg3 (30. Qg2 {is a bit easier, keeping the queen on a defended square.}) 30... Qg6 31. Rg4 (31. Rh4 { was better, maintaining the advantage.}) 31... Qxh5 $2 {A last mistake, and now Nazi doesn't forgive.} (31... Rxe5 $1 {gets Black back in the game.} 32. Qxe5 Nh3+ 33. Kh2 Qxg4 {and the position isn't clear anymore.}) 32. Rxg5 Qh7 33. Rf4 {Simple and strong. Rh4 is a nasty threat.} Ra6 34. Rfg4 $1 g6 35. Rxd4 {White is up a pawn and is dominating in the center. The point is easily reeled in from here.} Qg7 36. Rh4 Rae6 37. d4 Rd8 38. d5 Rb6 39. Qe3 Ra6 40. Rhg4 Re8 41. c5 {Irina decides she's seen enough. Nazi found the initiative seemingly out of nowhere, and used it to take out the tournament's highest rated player.} 1-0

Pairings Round Four

Table White Score Rating Black Score Rating Result
1 WCM Virkud, Apurva 1.5 2132 GM Krush, Irina 1.5 2477  
2 IM Goletiani, Rusudan 2.5 2311 IM Paikidze, Nazi 2.0 2333  
3 WGM Sharevich, Anna 1.0 2267 WIM Ni, Viktorija 0.5 2188  
4 WIM Wang, Annie 1.0 1901 WGM Foisor, Sabina-Francesca 1.5 2235  
5 FM Melekhina, Alisa 1.5 2235 WGM Nemcova, Katerina 2.5 2279  
6 WGM Abrahamyan, Tatev 1.0 2322 WFM Yu, Jennifer R 1.5 2180

Round three games

[Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Paikidze, N."] [Black "Krush, I."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A07"] [WhiteElo "2333"] [BlackElo "2477"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Bg4 3. Bg2 Nd7 4. d3 e6 5. Nbd2 Bd6 6. O-O Ne7 7. b3 O-O 8. Bb2 c5 9. c4 Nc6 10. a3 Re8 11. Qc2 d4 12. e3 e5 13. Rae1 a5 14. exd4 cxd4 15. Ne4 Be7 16. h3 Be6 17. Bc1 h6 18. g4 Nf8 19. g5 h5 20. Nxe5 Nxe5 21. f4 Qd7 22. fxe5 Bxh3 23. Qf2 Be6 24. Bf3 Bg4 25. Ng3 Nh7 26. Bxg4 Qxg4 27. Re4 Qe6 28. Nxh5 Bxg5 29. Bxg5 Nxg5 30. Qg3 Qg6 31. Rg4 Qxh5 32. Rxg5 Qh7 33. Rf4 Ra6 34. Rfg4 g6 35. Rxd4 Qg7 36. Rh4 Rae6 37. d4 Rd8 38. d5 Rb6 39. Qe3 Ra6 40. Rhg4 Re8 41. c5 1-0 [Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Ni, V."] [Black "Goletiani, R."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E43"] [WhiteElo "2188"] [BlackElo "2311"] [PlyCount "58"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 b6 5. Bd3 Bb7 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O O-O 8. a3 Bxc3 9. bxc3 Ne4 10. Nd2 Nxd2 11. Bxd2 f5 12. d5 exd5 13. Qf3 Nc6 14. cxd5 Ne5 15. Qe2 Bxd5 16. e4 Nxd3 17. exd5 c4 18. a4 Qf6 19. a5 b5 20. a6 f4 21. Rfb1 Rab8 22. Qf3 Qg6 23. Qh3 Rf5 24. Qf3 Rf6 25. Qh3 Qf7 26. Qf3 Rf5 27. Ra4 Rxd5 28. Rxc4 Ne5 29. Qxf4 Rxd2 0-1 [Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Nemcova, Kat"] [Black "Wang, Annie"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C01"] [WhiteElo "2279"] [BlackElo "1901"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bd3 Bd6 6. O-O O-O 7. h3 h6 8. c4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nbd7 10. Nc3 Nb6 11. Bb3 c6 12. Ne5 Nbd5 13. Re1 Be6 14. Qf3 Re8 15. Nxd5 Nxd5 16. Bd2 a5 17. a4 Be7 18. Rad1 Bg5 19. Qg3 Bh4 20. Qf3 Qf6 21. Re4 Qxf3 22. Nxf3 Be7 23. Rde1 Kf8 24. Ne5 Red8 25. Nxf7 Bxf7 26. Bxd5 Rxd5 27. Rxe7 b5 28. Rc7 Rxd4 29. Ree7 Bd5 30. Bc3 Re4 31. Rxg7 b4 32. Bd2 Re6 33. Be3 Rf6 34. Bc5+ Ke8 35. Rce7+ Kd8 36. Bb6+ 1-0 [Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Ni, V."] [Black "Goletiani, R."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E43"] [WhiteElo "2188"] [BlackElo "2311"] [PlyCount "58"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 b6 5. Bd3 Bb7 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O O-O 8. a3 Bxc3 9. bxc3 Ne4 10. Nd2 Nxd2 11. Bxd2 f5 12. d5 exd5 13. Qf3 Nc6 14. cxd5 Ne5 15. Qe2 Bxd5 16. e4 Nxd3 17. exd5 c4 18. a4 Qf6 19. a5 b5 20. a6 f4 21. Rfb1 Rab8 22. Qf3 Qg6 23. Qh3 Rf5 24. Qf3 Rf6 25. Qh3 Qf7 26. Qf3 Rf5 27. Ra4 Rxd5 28. Rxc4 Ne5 29. Qxf4 Rxd2 0-1 [Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Abrahamyan, T."] [Black "Virkud, Apurva"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2322"] [BlackElo "2132"] [PlyCount "77"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e6 7. f3 b5 8. Qd2 Nbd7 9. g4 Nb6 10. g5 Nfd7 11. a3 Bb7 12. O-O-O Rc8 13. f4 Nc5 14. Bd3 Nxd3+ 15. Qxd3 Nc4 16. h4 Qc7 17. Bd2 Nxd2 18. Rxd2 Qc4 19. Qe3 Be7 20. f5 e5 21. Nb3 Qc7 22. f6 gxf6 23. gxf6 Bf8 24. h5 Rg8 25. Kb1 Bc6 26. Rg1 Rxg1+ 27. Qxg1 a5 28. Rg2 Qd8 29. Qf1 b4 30. axb4 axb4 31. Nd5 Bxd5 32. exd5 Qb6 33. Rg8 Kd7 34. Qf5+ Kc7 35. Qxh7 Kb8 36. Qxf7 Bh6 37. Qg6 Bf8 38. h6 Qe3 39. h7 1-0 [Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Yu, Jennifer R"] [Black "Melekhina, A."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A36"] [WhiteElo "2180"] [BlackElo "2235"] [PlyCount "105"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. c4 c5 2. Nc3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 Nc6 5. e3 e5 6. Nge2 Nge7 7. O-O O-O 8. a3 d6 9. Rb1 a5 10. d3 Rb8 11. Bd2 Be6 12. Nd5 b5 13. cxb5 Bxd5 14. Bxd5 Nxd5 15. bxc6 Qb6 16. Qa4 Ra8 17. Rfc1 Ne7 18. d4 exd4 19. exd4 Nxc6 20. dxc5 dxc5 21. Be3 Nd4 22. Bxd4 cxd4 23. Rc6 Qb7 24. Nf4 Rfe8 25. Rc5 Re5 26. Rxe5 Bxe5 27. Nd3 Bf6 28. Re1 Kg7 29. Rc1 Ra6 30. Qc2 Rb6 31. Re1 h5 32. h4 Qd7 33. Qc5 Rb5 34. Qc4 Rf5 35. Nc5 Qd8 36. Ne4 Re5 37. Qd3 Qd5 38. Re2 Bd8 39. f4 Re6 40. Kf2 Bb6 41. Kf1 Qc6 42. Kf2 f5 43. Ng5 Rxe2+ 44. Kxe2 Qg2+ 45. Kd1 Qxb2 46. Qc4 Qa1+ 47. Ke2 d3+ 48. Qxd3 Qb2+ 49. Kd1 Kh6 50. Nf7+ Kg7 51. Ng5 Kh6 52. Nf7+ Kg7 53. Ng5 1/2-1/2 [Event "ch-USA w 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2015.04.03"] [Round "3"] [White "Foisor, S."] [Black "Sharevich, A."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D00"] [WhiteElo "2276"] [BlackElo "2267"] [PlyCount "93"] [EventDate "2015.03.31"] 1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 Nf6 3. e3 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nd2 e6 6. Ngf3 Bd6 7. Bg3 O-O 8. Bd3 b6 9. Qe2 Qc7 10. e4 dxe4 11. Nxe4 Nxe4 12. Bxe4 f5 13. Bxd6 Qxd6 14. dxc5 Qxc5 15. Bxc6 Qxc6 16. O-O-O a5 17. Rhe1 a4 18. a3 Qc7 19. Rd4 Ra5 20. Kb1 f4 21. Ka1 g6 22. Qc2 Bd7 23. Qd2 Bc8 24. Rd6 Rc5 25. Re4 b5 26. h4 Rc4 27. Re1 b4 28. axb4 Rc6 29. Rd1 a3 30. Rxc6 axb2+ 31. Kxb2 Qxc6 32. Qd6 Qe4 33. Qe5 Qc6 34. Rd6 Qc4 35. Nd2 Qc7 36. Rxe6 Qd8 37. Rd6 Qxh4 38. Ne4 Bf5 39. Nf6+ Kf7 40. Qd4 Be6 41. Nd5 Bxd5 42. Rd7+ Ke8 43. Rxd5 Qf6 44. Qc4 Qb6 45. Qe4+ Kf7 46. Rd7+ Kg8 47. Qe7 1-0

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Standings

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in six US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh will be annotating the games for the Saint Louis Chess Club.

Photos by Lennart Ootes

Links

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Topics US Champ, USA
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octavio rios octavio rios 4/5/2015 08:14
sevian muy bien preparado e inmenso talento y wesley un gran ejemplo a seguir
octavio rios octavio rios 4/5/2015 08:12
sevian esta preparandose muy bien y tiene un inmenso talento esa victoria demuestra su potencial y wesley mejor con su actitud
Karbuncle Karbuncle 4/4/2015 08:22
Regardless of the technical age record, it's still an incredible accomplishment for such a young player, and especially with the black pieces. You can argue So made mistakes, but that's how all games are won or lost.
KevinC KevinC 4/4/2015 07:50
The biggest reason 14-year-olds (or younger even) don't beat guys in the top 10: They just don't get that many opportunities. Kid GMs see so much, that even the best can overlook a tactic.
ChessInquisitor ChessInquisitor 4/4/2015 07:12
"At age 14 years and three months, Sevian is probably the youngest player ever to beat a Top Ten player at standard time control."
Albeit a little older, the 15 year Bobby Fischer scored wins over Sammy Reshevsky and Bent Larsen in 1958. Debatable if Sammy was still in the Top Ten or if Bent had reached that standard. These were clean wins, though, coupled with other fine performances like draws against David Bronstein, Mikhail Tal, Tigran Petrosian and Svetoszar Gligoric. Whereas Sevian followed Aronian-Anand, one of the most famous TNs in recent years but was quickly out of book and in trouble, only to be let off by Wesley's mistake.
samvils samvils 4/4/2015 06:17
you win some you lose some.. great sportsmanship idol Wesley.. good luck to the next round...
ChessHulk ChessHulk 4/4/2015 01:57
So's attitude is refreshing! We see a smiling face, not a sulking sad face which would be understandable for most people.
KevinC KevinC 4/4/2015 01:42
Paikidze-Krush, this really should have been added to the annotations: 21...Nc6 22.f5 Bc8 23.f6 Bd6? 24. fg Kg7 25. Qf2 Ne5 26.Nd6 Qd6 27.Bf4 and black is lost.
Zarbo Zarbo 4/4/2015 10:44
"At age 14 years and three months, Sevian is probably the youngest player ever to beat a Top Ten player at standard time control."

After 5 minutes of research using Chessbase: Carlsen (30-11-1994) beats Shirov (nr 10) at Drammen Smartfish (3-1-2005). 14 years and 1 month. There might be others that were younger as well.
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