Super Final R7: Kasparov, Svidler win

11/22/2004 – Two quick draws, one monumental struggle, and two decided games – not bad for round seven of the Russian Championship. Peter Svidler was relentless against Alexey Korotylev, while Garry Kasparov looked as if he was in a spot of trouble against his elderly opponent Vitaly Tseshkovsky. Take a look at how the world's number one turned it around...

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

57th Russian Championship
Super Final

November 14th – December 1st 2004

The Super Final of the 57th Russian is being held in the Festive Hall of the Hotel Rossija (“Rociya”), directly adjacent to the Red Square. The prize sum is US $125,000, to be paid out in rouble equivalent. The winner takes $50,000. The participants of this round robin tournament are Garry Kasparov, Alexander Morozevich, Alexander Grischuk, Peter Svidler, Evgeny Bareev, Alexey Dreev, Vitaly Tseshkovsky, Alexander Motylev, Vladimir Epishin, Artem Timofeev and Alexey Korotylev. Originally Vladimir Kramnik and Anatoly Karpov were included, but both withdrew at the last moment.

Round seven – Monday, November 22, 2004

We start with the drawn games. Timofeev-Bareev was one of those why-should-we-waste-our-strength 17-move draws, while Morozevich-Grischuk ended after 26 moves in a mutual-respect repetition. Dreev-Motylev, a Petrosian in the Queen's Indian, was a tough fight, with chances for both sides. In the end it was Dreev who was pressing, but the game ended after 78 moves in an unwinnable R+P vs R.

Now the decided encounters. Peter Svidler was relentless against Alexey Korotylev's Sicilian Rauzer, gaining a very clear advantage in the middle game and raking in the full point, even if it took 62 moves. Garry Kasparov, playing against Vitaly Tseshkovsky – the two oldest players in the field tally 101 years on the age scale – and seemed to be in a lot of trouble in the Scheveningen he had chosen after Tseshkovsky played 1.e4.

Tseshkovsky,V (2577) - Kasparov,G (2813) [B84]
57th ch-RUS Moscow RUS (7), 22.11.2004
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.0-0 Be7 8.a4 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.f4 Qc7 11.Kh1 Re8 12.Bg1 Bd7 13.Nb3 b6 14.Bf3 Rab8 15.Qe2 Nb4 16.e5 Nfd5 17.Nxd5 Nxd5 18.Be4 b5 19.Nd4 g6 20.f5 exf5 21.Bxd5 dxe5 22.Nxf5 Bxf5

Here the 60-year-old Tseshkovsky sacrificed an exchange for a dangerous attack: 23.Rxf5 gxf5 24.Qh5 Bf8 25.Qxf5 Bg7 26.Ra3 e4 27.Rh3 h6.

Here 28.Qg6 e3 29.Rg3 Qe5 30.Bxf7+ Kh8 31.Rxe3 looked dead lost for Black, but 31...Qxe3 32.Bxe3 Rxe3 leaves the position unclear. Misha Savinov reports that Kasparov had seen 28.Qg6 before playing 27...h6, but nevertheless decided to allow it. "First of all, it is a hard move to find at the board after three hours of tense play," Kasparov said. "Yes, I had 27...Re5 28.Qxh7+ Kf8 29.Rg3 Rxd5 30.Rxg7, and maybe White does not achieve anything, but it all looks too scary. 28.Qg6 with idea of 29.Rg3 forces me to reply with 28...e3 29.Rg3 Qe5 30.Bxf7+ Kh8 31.Rxe3 Qxe3 32.Bxe3 Rxe3, and this ending is probably winning for White." There is more analysis at the Chess Cafe, but this page may disappear into the archives after a while and be replaced by a different one.

Anyway Tseshkovsky chose another path: 28.Rg3 Qe5 29.Bxf7+ Kh8 30.Qg6 Rf8 (looks dangerous, but Black has everything under control – in fact he is clearly better) 31.axb5 axb5 32.Bd5 Rf1 33.c3 Rbf8 34.h3 Qf6 35.Bxe4 Qxg6 36.Rxg6 Re8 37.Bd3 Rd1 38.Rd6 Bf8 39.Bg6 Bxd6 0-1.

While watching this game on Playchess.com there was speculation that Kasparov is intentionally allowing himself to get worse positions in order to provoke the fight he will otherwise not get. "Normally he is faced with some grandmaster with 20 years of experience playing the 'immovable object' game," said one wag. "Instead of pounding away he has opened up weakness to provoke the opponent into throwing punches." And that is when he can strike back. It is just a theory – maybe he just got into trouble and found a fortuitous way to turn the game around. Whatever the reason, Kasparov is now in the sole lead in this event, even standing to pick up a rating point or two in the process.

Round seven – 22.11.2004
Svidler, Peter
1-0 Korotylev, Alexey
Dreev, Alexey
1/2 Motylev, Alexander
Timofeev, Artyom
1/2 Bareev, Evgeny
Morozevich, Alexander
1/2 Grischuk, Alexander
Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
0-1 Kasparov, Garry
Epishin, Vladimir free
Games for replay and download

Current standings

Kasparov +3
Grischuk +2
Timofeev +1
Dreev +1
Svidler +1
Bareev 0
Korotylev –1
Epishin –1
Motylev –1
Morozevich –2
Tseshkovsky –3

Tomorrow is a free day – round eight will be played on Wednesday

All Results

Round one – 15.11.2004
Dreev, Alexey
1/2
Timofeev, Artyom
Epishin, Vladimir
1/2
Morozevich, Alexander
Kasparov, Garry
1-0
Bareev, Evgeny
Motylev, Alexander
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander
Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
0-1
Svidler, Peter
Korotylev, Alexey free
Round two – 16.11.2004
Grischuk, Alexander
1/2
Epishin, Vladimir
Timofeev, Artyom
1/2
Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
Korotylev, Alexey
1/2
Kasparov, Garry
Morozevich, Alexander
0-1
Dreev, Alexey
Bareev, Evgeny
1/2
Motylev, Alexander
Svidler, Peter free
Round three – 17.11.2004
Svidler, Peter
0-1 Timofeev, Artyom
Dreev, Alexey
1/2 Grischuk, Alexander
Epishin, Vladimir
1/2 Bareev, Evgeny
Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
1-0 Morozevich, Alexander
Motylev, Alexander
0-1 Korotylev, Alexey
Kasparov, Garry free
Round four – 18.11.2004
Grischuk, Alexander
1-0 Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
Kasparov, Garry
1/2 Motylev, Alexander
Morozevich, Alexander
1/2 Svidler, Peter
Korotylev, Alexey
1/2 Epishin, Vladimir
Bareev, Evgeny
1/2 Dreev, Alexey
Timofeev, Artyom free
Round five – 20.11.2004
Svidler, Peter
1/2 Grischuk, Alexander
Dreev, Alexey
1-0 Korotylev, Alexey
Timofeev, Artyom
1/2 Morozevich, Alexander
Epishin, Vladimir
1/2 Kasparov, Garry
Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
0-1 Bareev, Evgeny
Motylev, Alexander free
Round six – 21.11.2004
Grischuk, Alexander
1/2 Timofeev, Artyom
Kasparov, Garry
1-0 Dreev, Alexey
Korotylev, Alexey
1/2 Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
Bareev, Evgeny
1/2 Svidler, Peter
Motylev, Alexander
1-0 Epishin, Vladimir
Morozevich, Alexander free
Round seven – 22.11.2004
Svidler, Peter
1-0 Korotylev, Alexey
Dreev, Alexey
1/2 Motylev, Alexander
Timofeev, Artyom
1/2 Bareev, Evgeny
Morozevich, Alexander
1/2 Grischuk, Alexander
Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
0-1 Kasparov, Garry
Epishin, Vladimir free
Round eight – 24.11.2004
Kasparov, Garry
  Svidler, Peter
Epishin, Vladimir
  Dreev, Alexey
Korotylev, Alexey
  Timofeev, Artyom
Bareev, Evgeny
  Morozevich, Alexander
Motylev, Alexander
  Tseshkovsky, Vitaly
Grischuk, Alexander free

 


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register