San Luis R10: Kasimdzhanov beats Polgar

10/10/2005 – The still reigning Uzbek world champion almost spoiled a completely winning position against Judit Polgar, but won the game in the end. Topalov had what must certainly be a winning position against Morozevich, but only managed to draw. Leko vs Svidler and Adams vs Anand were both drawn. Full illustrated report.

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The FIDE World Chess Championship is taking place in the Hotel Potrero de los Funes Complex, in the Province of San Luis, Argentina, from September 27 to October 16, 2005.

Round Ten Summary

Round 10: Sunday, October 9th
Veselin Topalov
½-½
A. Morozevich
Peter Leko
½-½
Peter Svidler
R. Kasimdzhanov
1-0
Judit Polgar
Michael Adams
½-½
Vishy Anand

Current standings at the World Championship in San Luis


World Championship Diary: Round 10

By Nigel Short – on site in San Luis

What will Alexander Morozevich do? Three wins in a row and today he faces Topalov with Black. With his extraordinarily fecund mind it is almost irrelevant which colour the Russian has. If on form, absolutely anything is possible. That said, even if he were to produce an upset today it would be unlikely to affect the destination of first prize – so great is the Bulgar’s lead.


Toalov vs Morozevich in round ten

3.30pm: The hand of Alexander Belyavsky, the second of Morozevich, is readily discernible in the choice of the Queen’s Gambit Declined. Perhaps a touch surprised, but nevertheless not unduly perturbed, Toppy makes a small deviation from his regular repertoire. He will want to keep it tight at the back and not allow anything too chaotic to happen.

Leko-Svidler is an Anti-Marshall. It evokes painful memories of my first ever game in a World Championship Final – one which I lost on time in a better position, after having struggled my way back from inferiority. It looks as if White holds the advantage here too. Leko is rather good in this type of structure: he likes nothing more than to be in control.


Michael Adams in round 10

Adams-Anand is another Anti-Marshall. The Tamil sage has organized his forces rather more efficaciously than Svidler, in my view, as the pin on White’s c4 knight is a little awkward for the Englishman.

4.30pm: Kasimjanov-Polgar follows patterns similar to the historic game 24 of the 1985 Karpov-Kasparov match, the one which made young Garry World Champion, although (and I can be very wrong here) White seems to have a turbo-charged version through not having wasted time with his king.


Nigel Short working on this report in his hotel room

5.00pm: I have not been writing as much as usual because I have chatting with the recently retired Garry Kasparov himself who is watching the games from his home in Moscow. Morozevich appears to be doing fine, and the great oracle predicts a draw by repetition before too long. He appended the somewhat cynical remark “and everyone is happy” to his little variation. Probably quite true though.


Adams and Anand after their tenth round game

An outbreak of pandiculation greets the end of Adams-Anand, which finishes tamely in an agreed draw. One gets the feeling that Vishy has given up the race for first place and is just content to accumulate a few more points and finish on a modest plus score. Given that Adams is having a torrid time of it here, it is perhaps a bit surprising that Anand did not chose to continue in the final position, as he in no way stood worse. Mind you, the oldest players in the tournament are probably beginning to tire.


Judit Polgar, losing to Kasimdzhanov in round ten

Kasimjanov’s Attack is looking rather menacing against Polgar. She is a good tactician, but she will need all the tricks she can muster to save this one. The very popular woman has really struggled with her Black repertoire against 1.e4 in San Luis. Essentially she employs the same variety of sharpish Sicilian systems which have suited her well over the years. However, those that live by the sword also die by the sword, and when slightly below par, as she certainly is here, the losses flow in abundance.


The player of the year: Veselin Topalov

I am glad to see that Garry’s jaundiced prognostication did not materialize: Toppy and Moroz are fighting hard. It looks though that the Bulgar has slightly the better of it due to his active rooks. Nevertheless Black’s position is resilient and his passed d-pawn, blockaded though it is at the moment, potentially a great asset.


You don't want to mess with Peter the Swede

5.50pm: Second-placed Svidler appears to have overcome the worst of a somewhat rancid-smelling opening and has more or less equalized. Whether he can now go onto the offensive, I have my doubts. Early in the tournament he confided “Look at (the physical condition of ) Topalov. Look at me. By round 10 I know I will be starting to tire, but Topalov will still going strong.” No doubt Peter will try his best, but if his fears of exhaustion prove accurate, he might lack the necessary strength to force proceedings.


Peter Leko in his round ten game against Peter Svidler

6.10: Perhaps I am wrong about his ambition. He has sacrificed a pawn to obtain activity. Should he recoup the modest investment, he will most likely stand better.


The Peters: Leko and Svidler in the press conference

6.20pm: Leko-Svidler, draw agreed. There was an interesting moment just before the end when Svidler could perhaps have sacrificed the exchange and obtained a passed pawn on the seventh rank as compensation. It entailed some risk though, and I am not surprised that he chose to let the opportunity slip gently by.


A distinguished visitor: Governor of San Luis Dr. Alberto Rodriguez Saa

6.45: Topalov continues to pound Morozevich’s fissiparous defences. The White pawns are poised for the sudden assault on the Black king. In time pressure Topalov advances his e-pawn posing serious, insurmountable problems for his opponent. Soon a rook occupies the seventh rank and White obtains a powerful bishop against a humble knight. The White forces are now flooding in. I think it is all over. White goes a pawn, nay, two pawns ahead – and has a monster passer on f7.


GM Miguel Quinteros watching the games on the server

Meanwhile Kasim has conducted his attack competently enough to have fair prospects for victory, although he did miss a couple of simple and indeed devastating blows on move 31. With the time control now reached he must guard his own king, which is rather more draughty than he would like it to be. It is not over yet - not by any means. Judit is very tricky when she has espies tactical chances; the modest one pawn advantage which the Uzbek now enjoys could disappear in the blink of an eye.


Former FIDE president Florencio Campomanes playing blitz

Morozevich’s knight has gone on a mission deep into outer-space. Looks like this probe will not be returning to Earth. No! I can’t believe it. Toppy has blundered the exchange! Ok, he still stands better – perhaps even much better – but Morozevich is back from the dead.


The venue, idyllically located on the banks of a lake surrounded by mountains

8.10pm: Kasim wins! He did that very nicely, and rather quickly, in fact. His f-pawn was jettisoned to allow queen and rook to combine together elegantly in an attack on the king, Mate could only be prevented by the loss of the queen. Polgar will now have her work cut out to avoid finishing in last place. Kasim recovers some lost ground.


One of the denizens of the San Luis countryside

8.40: In an escape that would have made Houdini proud, Moroz saves the game – his rook performing wonders. Even White had to be careful towards the end. The considerable audience show their appreciation by applauding warmly. That was a flawed but heroic battle, in which tenacity and luck played their part. Topalov edges closer to victory. The rest of the field though still have much to play for.

A Short glossary

fecund – adjective; highly fertile; able to produce offspring,.intellectually productive.

efficacious – adjective; having the power to produce a desired effect

pandiculation – noun; yawning and stretching, as when fatigued and drowsy or after waking from sleep.

fissiparous – adjective; inclined to cause or undergo fission.

All photos: Word Chess Championship Press, Nadja Woisin, Frederic Friedel


Full schedule

Round 1: Wednesday, September 28th

Peter Leko
0-1
Veselin Topalov
A. Morozevich
½-½
R. Kasimdzhanov
Peter Svidler
½-½
Michael Adams
Judit Polgar
0-1
Vishy Anand
Round 2: Thursday, September 29th
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Vishy Anand
Michael Adams
½-½
Judit Polgar
R. Kasimdzhanov
½-½
Peter Svidler
Peter Leko
½-½
A. Morozevich
Round 3: Friday, September 30th
A. Morozevich
0-1
Veselin Topalov
Peter Svidler
1-0
Peter Leko
Judit Polgar
1-0
R. Kasimdzhanov
Vishy Anand
1-0
Michael Adams
Round 4: Saturday, October 1st
Veselin Topalov
1-0
Michael Adams
R. Kasimdzhanov
1-0
Vishy Anand
Peter Leko
1-0
Judit Polgar
A. Morozevich
0-1
Peter Svidler
Free day: Sunday, October 2nd
Round 5: Monday, October 3rd
Peter Svidler
0-1
Veselin Topalov
Judit Polgar
½-½
A. Morozevich
Vishy Anand
½-½
Peter Leko
Michael Adams
½-½
R. Kasimdzhanov
Round 6: Tuesday, October 4th
Judit Polgar
0-1
Veselin Topalov
Vishy Anand
½-½
Peter Svidler
Michael Adams
½-½
A. Morozevich
R. Kasimdzhanov
½-½
Peter Leko
Round 7: Wednesday, October 5th
Veselin Topalov
1-0
R. Kasimdzhanov
Peter Leko
1-0
Michael Adams
A. Morozevich
1-0
Vishy Anand
Peter Svidler
1-0
Judit Polgar
Round 8: Thursday, October 6th
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Peter Leko
R. Kasimdzhanov
0-1
A. Morozevich
Michael Adams
½-½
Peter Svidler
Vishy Anand
1-0
Judit Polgar
Free day: Friday, October 7th
Round 9: Saturday, October 8th
Vishy Anand
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Judit Polgar
½-½
Michael Adams
Peter Svidler
½-½
R. Kasimdzhanov
A. Morozevich
1-0
Peter Leko
Round 10: Sunday, October 9th
Veselin Topalov
½-½
A. Morozevich
Peter Leko
½-½
Peter Svidler
R. Kasimdzhanov
1-0
Judit Polgar
Michael Adams
½-½
Vishy Anand
Round 11: Monday, October 10th
Michael Adams
-
Veselin Topalov
Vishy Anand
-
R. Kasimdzhanov
Judit Polgar
-
Peter Leko
Peter Svidler
-
A. Morozevich
Games – Report
Round 12: Tuesday, October 11th
Veselin Topalov
-
Peter Svidler
A. Morozevich
-
Judit Polgar
Peter Leko
-
Vishy Anand
R. Kasimdzhanov
-
Michael Adams
Games – Report
Free day: Wednesday, October 12th
Round 13: Thursday, October 13th
R. Kasimdzhanov
-
Veselin Topalov
Michael Adams
-
Peter Leko
Vishy Anand
-
A. Morozevich
Judit Polgar
-
Peter Svidler
Games – Report
Round 14: Friday, October 14th
Veselin Topalov
-
Judit Polgar
Peter Svidler
-
Vishy Anand
A. Morozevich
-
Michael Adams
Peter Leko
-
R. Kasimdzhanov
Games – Report
Tie-breaks: Saturday, October 15th

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