Master Moves #6

2/20/2011 – All the deepest plans or endgame technique are useless if you fall victim to a shot that leaves you in a lost position. Likewise, sometimes that superior play will only offer a single window of opportunity to deliver that final blow, so it is vital to be ready for it when it does. All the positions in this column are from the Aeroflot Open A and B. Can you see as sharply as an eagle?

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Master Moves #6

All the deepest plans or endgame technique are useless if you fall victim to a shot that leaves you in a lost position. Likewise, sometimes that superior play will only offer a single window of opportunity to deliver that final blow, so it is vital to be ready for it when it does.

All the positions below are from the final rounds of the Aeroflot Open, representing shots both played and missed. The last two are harder than the rest (for a human). There is a link to the answers at the bottom.

Position 1








Sometimes we'd like to do it all, but can't. White to play and win.

Position 2








An unexpected shot shows that White's pieces
are overwhelmed. Black to play and win.

Position 3








White to play and win.

Position 4








White to play and win.

Position 5








Though this was a painful loss by Kamsky, falling prey to a nice
sequence, he did bounce back after. Black to play and win.

Position 6








Kotronios entered this sequence expecting to now recover
his piece, but ran into a problem. Black to play and win.

Position 7








Kosteniuk showed what playing like a girl can do.
Unleash the Kraken! White to play and win.

Position 8








Untitled Belous (we won't be able to use that moniker for long),
winner of the Moscow Open 2011, played a brilliant combination here.
Black to play and win.

Click here to see solutions

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