London Rd3: Mamyedyarov beats Giri in spectacular miniature

9/23/2012 – The round was one more marked by near misses than big wins. Topalov neutralized a spectacular opening sacrifice uncorked by Kasimdzhanov, while Grischuk built a winning position against Wang Hao, only to miss the money shot. Nakamura also narrowly missed Leko, but the game of the day was Mamedyarov's impressive miniature against Giri. Full video reports plus GM analysis.

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The First FIDE Grand Prix is taking place from September 21 to October 3rd in Simpson’s-in-the-Strand, London. The games start at 14:00h local time (= 15:00h CEST, 17:00h Moscow, 09:00 a.m. New York). The tournament has a prize fund of 240,000 Euros.

Round three report

By GM Alejandro Ramirez

Round 3 on 2012/09/23 at 14:00
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2738
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
1-0
Giri Anish 2730
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
½-½
Adams Michael 2722


Game of the day: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov vs Anish Giri (see below)

Topalov-Kasimdzhanov: Kasimdzhanov uncorks a beautiful novelty with 12… c5!!  This piece sacrifice gives him dangerous possibilities on the kingside while at the same time giving him pressure on a pinned knight on the c-file.  A must see game for every fan of the semi-slav.  Unfortunately for the rest of the chess fans, Topalov finds an adequate defense and the game peters out into a lifeless draw.

Ivanchuk-Adams Ivanchuk’s less than testing variation against the Nimzo-Indian allows Mickey to go up a pawn, but with a bad pawn structure.  The English player promptly returns this pawn to easily hold a completely drawn rook endgame.  Draw.

Dominguez-Gelfand: Gelfand relies on the Sveshnikov again, which I had dubbed the new Petroff.  Maybe I was correct?  Draw.

Wang Hao-Grischuk: After Grischuk outplays his opponent and shows better preparation from the opening, it seems everything is en route for him to get a point with the Black pieces.  I can’t say that it was Wang Hao’s tenacity that saved him, more likely luck, when Grischuk completely misses a killing blow on move 27.  After that, his position, though better, starts slipping away move by move and eventually the game finishes in a draw.

Nakamura-Leko: The American puts on pressure throughout the entire game, and enters a superior rook endgame.  A long battle ensues, and White’s position keeps getting better and better.  Eventually, in a very simplified endgame that is still very complex, Hikaru is unable to deliver the finishing blow.  Leko shows great endgame mastery and saves a valuable half point.  Draw.

Mamedyarov-Giri


Video stream of the whole game

[Event "FIDE Grand Prix - London 2012"] [Site "London"] [Date "2012.09.23"] [Round "3"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D11"] [WhiteElo "2729"] [BlackElo "2730"] [Annotator "Ramirez, Alejandro"] [PlyCount "41"] [EventDate "2012.??.??"] [EventCountry "ENG"] {Some annotators feel that a game of the day shouldn't be a one sided affair, where a simple mistake in the opening leads to disaster. I am not one of those annotators.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Qb3 {Not the most topical treatment of the Slav defense, but this move has given Black headaches in the past. Recently, Giri himself tried it against Aronian, but was swiftly crushed. } e6 (4... dxc4 5. Qxc4 Bg4 {is considered to be ok for Black, last time I checked.}) 5. Bg5 (5. g3 {was Giri-Aronian from the Olympiad, a game worth checking out.}) 5... h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. Qxc4 b5 8. Qc2 Bb7 9. Nbd2 Nbd7 10. e4 { Not the most common plan, as White usually plays more solidly with e3. Black has tried Qb6 on a few occasions in this position.} Rc8 $2 {If losing a tempo in the opening is a no-no. Losing a tempo in the opening against Mamedyarov is a *big* no no. It's not easy at first to understand why this is a tempo loss, but the fact is that making c5 stronger does nothing if White sacrifices a pawn on d5 anyway. What I'm saying basically is that a6 had to be played immediately, and then c5.} (10... a6 11. Be2 c5 12. d5 (12. dxc5 Bxc5 13. O-O Rc8 $15) 12... Bd6 {and clearly Bd6 is more useful than Rc8.}) (10... Qb6 $5) 11. Be2 a6 12. O-O c5 13. d5 exd5 $2 {Way too happy. Black is busted after this.} (13... Qb6 14. dxe6 Qxe6 {is no one's dream, but Black is holding on in an uncomfortable position. He might have to shed a pawn to finish development.} (14... fxe6 15. e5 $18 {with a decisive threat with Qg6 checkmate if the knight moves!})) 14. e5 g5 15. Bg3 Ne4 16. Nxe4 dxe4 17. Nd2 {Notice how useless Black's Rc8 move was. If White regains the pawn on e4 without any resistance, he will be much better positionally. He has all the targets, a strong e6 break potentially, better development and a solid pawn structure. Black would be nothing but weaknesses and discoordinated pieces. Giri tries to muddle the waters and it blows up in his face really quickly.} h5 18. Nxe4 Rh6 {Covering the e6 square.} (18... h4 {loses to any move a grandmaster would consider.} 19. e6 $1 $18 (19. Rad1 $18) (19. Bg4 $18)) 19. Rad1 Be7 {Any move wins here, but Mamedyarov is exact.} 20. Bxh5 $1 Rxh5 21. e6 $1 {And it's all over. Once Black loses his knight he will be totally lost and with even material. Giri decided he didn't want more agony.} (21. e6 fxe6 (21... Bc6 22. exd7+ Bxd7 23. Rd5 {with the deadly threat of Rad1, which is unstoppable.}) 22. Nd6+ Kf8 23. Qg6 {with no real way of defending f7.}) 1-0


Interview with the players – all videos from London by Macauley Peterson

Play of the Day by GM Daniel King


Daniel King analyzes Mamedyarov-Giri as the Play of the Day

Standings after three rounds

All photos by Ray Morris-Hill

Schedule and results

Round 1 on 2012/09/21 at 14:00
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
0-1
Gelfand Boris 2738
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Giri Anish 2730
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Round 2 on 2012/09/22 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
1-0
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Adams Michael 2722
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Giri Anish 2730
½-½
Wang Hao 2742
Grischuk Alexander 2754
½-½
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Gelfand Boris 2738
½-½
Topalov Veselin 2752
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
0-1
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Round 3 on 2012/09/23 at 14:00
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2738
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
1-0
Giri Anish 2730
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Round 4 on 2012/09/24 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
-
Adams Michael 2722
Giri Anish 2730
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Grischuk Alexander 2754
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Gelfand Boris 2738
-
Wang Hao 2742
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
-
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
-
Topalov Veselin 2752
Round 5 on 2012/09/25 at 14:00
Topalov Veselin 2752
-
Leko Peter 2737
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
-
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Wang Hao 2742
-
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
-
Gelfand Boris 2738
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
-
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Adams Michael 2722
-
Giri Anish 2730
Round 6 on 2012/09/27 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
-
Giri Anish 2730
Grischuk Alexander 2754
-
Adams Michael 2722
Gelfand Boris 2738
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
-
Wang Hao 2742
Topalov Veselin 2752
-
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Round 7 on 2012/09/28 at 14:00
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
-
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Hao 2742
-
Topalov Veselin 2752
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
-
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
-
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Adams Michael 2722
-
Gelfand Boris 2738
Giri Anish 2730
-
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Round 8 on 2012/09/29 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
-
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Gelfand Boris 2738
-
Giri Anish 2730
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
-
Adams Michael 2722
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Topalov Veselin 2752
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
-
Wang Hao 2742
Round 9 on 2012/10/01 at 14:00
Wang Hao 2742
-
Leko Peter 2737
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
-
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
-
Topalov Veselin 2752
Adams Michael 2722
-
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Giri Anish 2730
-
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Grischuk Alexander 2754
-
Gelfand Boris 2738
Round 10 on 2012/10/02 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
-
Gelfand Boris 2738
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
-
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
-
Giri Anish 2730
Topalov Veselin 2752
-
Adams Michael 2722
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Wang Hao 2742
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Round 11 on 2012/10/03 at 11:00
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
-
Leko Peter 2737
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
-
Wang Hao 2742
Adams Michael 2722
-
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Giri Anish 2730
-
Topalov Veselin 2752
Grischuk Alexander 2754
-
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Gelfand Boris 2738
-
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684

Links

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