London Classic R2: Nakamura beats Aronian, Carlsen escapes McShane

12/4/2011 – In round two, Hikaru Nakamura and Levon Aronian resumed their theoretical battle (the third in a row) and once again the American got the better of it. Nigel Short had such an off-day that even Vladimir Kramnik, who won, was deeply sympathetic. Magnus Carlsen escaped by a whisker (he is old enough) from Luke McShane in a losing endgame after a long struggle. Illustrated report.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

London Chess Classic 2011

The 2011 London Chess Classic is taking place in the Olympia Conference Centre from Saturday, December 3rd until Monday, December 12th, starting at 14:00h London time each day (final round 12:00h). Time controls are classical forty moves in two hours, then twenty moves in one hour and thirty minutes for the rest of the game. A win is counted as three points, a draw as one, and a loss zero. Tiebreaks: 1) number of wins, 2) number of wins with black, 3) result of the individual game between the tied players. In the unlikely event that there is still a tie then: 4) 2 x 15'+2" games, and if necessary 5) Armageddon game: 6'+2" vs 5'+2" with draw odds for black. If there is a tie involving more than two players then the Rapid games will be conducted as a double round all play all. The total prize fund is €160,000 before tax.

Round two

Round 2: Sunday, December 4, 2011
David Howell
½ ½
Michael Adams 
Luke McShane
½ ½
Magnus Carlsen
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Levon Aronian
Nigel Short
0-1
Vladimir Kramnik 
Vishy Anand (bye) – assisting commentary


Michael Adams and Luke McShane wait for the start of round one


The first move in McShane-Carlsen is made by Samir Samadov, 9 (see below)


Round two of the London Chess Classic 2011 under way


What are the others playing? At the start everyone keeps checking on the big displays


Magnus Carlsen, the world's number one, facing....


"Britain's strongest amateur" Luke McShane


GM Hikaru Nakamura, USA, beating...


... the world's number three, Levon Aronian from Armenia


Former World Champion Vladimir Kramnik defeated...


... former World Championship Challenger Nigel Short

Photos by Ray Morris-Hill and John Saunders


Impressions from the VIP room

By Frederic Friedel


Chess teacher Sabrina Chevannes teaching Mila...


...and her brother Liam the rules of the game

The two above are twins and learnt the moves of the game during round one. Now the have persuaded their father to keep bringing them to the Chess Festival to get more of the same – chess enthusiasm in its purest form.

Family chess lessons for UCL Professor of Electical Engineering Polina Bayvel and her son Peter. Polina specialises in fibre optics and is, in her own words, "trying to redefine the Shannon Limit and maximise bandwidth in data transmission". In the interest of HD videos on the Internet we wish her all success.


Playing against his father, Anatoly Zayats, professor of physics at Kings


The kids watch the big boy play: IM Ali Mortasavi vs Vishy Anand


Giving Ali a tough time... Samir Samadov plays one-minute bullet against the IM

Samir Samadov is nine years old, was born in Baku, started playing chess club in the "Kasparov Chess Club" in Baku. The family moved to Atherton in Greater Manchester, where Samir went to the St. Philips Church of England Primary School, the same that Nigel Short attended when he was a child. Now Samir goes to Richmond Junior Chess Club in London and plays chess at the Wallace Chess Club and in Holland Park. He speaks English as his first language, and Russian "not very well." Samir has had to oversome some very serious health problems and is one of the bravest, most spirited youngsters we have encountered in a long while.


GM Michael Stean, Robert Skidelsky and Nigel Short

Robert Jacob Alexander, Baron Skidelsky is a British economic historian of Russian origin. He is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick, England and the author of an award-winning major three volume biography of John Maynard Keynes. We got an extremely valuable (an illuminating) lecture on the current world economic situation from this leading expert in his field. You should read some of his articles here.


Schedule and results

Round 1: Saturday, December 3, 2011
Vladimir Kramnik
½ ½
Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian
½ ½
Luke McShane 
Magnus Carlsen
1-0
David Howell 
Michael Adams
½ ½
Vishy Anand 
Nigel Short (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 2: Sunday, December 4, 2011
David Howell
½ ½
Michael Adams 
Luke McShane
½ ½
Magnus Carlsen
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Levon Aronian
Nigel Short
0-1
Vladimir Kramnik 
Vishy Anand (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 3: Monsay, December 5, 2011
Levon Aronian
  Nigel Short 
Magnus Carlsen
  Hikaru Nakamura
Michael Adams
  Luke McShane 
Vishy Anand
  David Howell 
Vladimir Kramnik (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 4: Tuesday, December 6, 2011
Magnus Carlsen
  Vladimir Kramnik 
Michael Adams
  Nigel Short 
Vishy Anand
  Hikaru Nakamura
David Howell
  Luke McShane 
Levon Aronian (bye) – assisting commentary
Wednesday, December 7, 2011 Rest day
Round 5: Thursday, December 8, 2011
Hikaru Nakamura
  David Howell 
Nigel Short
  Vishy Anand 
Vladimir Kramnik
  Michael Adams 
Levon Aronian
  Magnus Carlsen
Luke McShane (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 6: Friday, December 9, 2011
Michael Adams
  Levon Aronian
Vishy Anand
  Vladimir Kramnik 
David Howell
  Nigel Short 
Luke McShane
  Hikaru Nakamura
Magnus Carlsen (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 7: Saturday, December 10, 2011
Nigel Short 
  Luke McShane 
Vladimir Kramnik 
  David Howell 
Levon Aronian
  Vishy Anand 
Magnus Carlsen
  Michael Adams 
Hikaru Nakamura (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 8: Sunday, December 11, 2011
Vishy Anand
  Magnus Carlsen
David Howell
  Levon Aronian
Luke McShane
  Vladimir Kramnik 
Hikaru Nakamura
  Nigel Short 
Michael Adams (bye) – assisting commentary
Round 9: Monday, December 12, 2011
Luke McShane
  Vishy Anand 
Hikaru Nakamura
  Michael Adams 
Nigel Short
  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik
  Levon Aronian
David Howell (bye) – assisting commentary

All games start at 2 p.m. or 14:00h British time = 15:00h CET, 17:00h Moscow, 7:30 p.m. Chennai, 22:00h Beijing, 01:00 a.m. Melbourne, 03:00 a.m. Auckland (sorry Murray!), 6 a.m. San José, 9 a.m. New York. You can check your location here. Naturally the games will be covered live on the official web site (below) and on Playchess. Stand by for further details on Saturday. The games of the final round start two hours earlier.


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client and get immediate access. Or you can get our latest Fritz 13 program, which includes six months free premium membership to Playchess.

Links


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register