Ju Wenjun wins Grand Prix series

by André Schulz
12/5/2016 – Ju Wenjun won the Fide Women's Grand Prix in Khanty-Mansiysk, the last tournament of the Grand Prix series 2015/2016. By winning this tournament Ju Wenjun also won Grand Prix series and now has the right to challenge the next Women's World Champion for the title. The next Women's World Champion will be established in February, in a knock-out tournament in Tehran.

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Grand Prix winner Ju Wenjun

Ju Wenjun's victory was smooth and convincing. After winning in round 10 against Bela Kotenashvili she was certain to become at least shared first and needed only a draw in the final round to become sole tournament winner.

Ju Wenjun (right) and Bela Kotenashvili

By winning the tournament in Khanty-Mansiysk Ju Wenjun also won the Grand Prix series 2015/2016. The winner of the Grand Prix qualifies for a ten-game World Championship match against the Women's World Champin. In contrast to the open World Championship in which two players player every two years for the title, the women play every year for the title. One year there is a match for the title, the next year, the Women's World Champion is established in a knock-out tournament. But as the Fide found no organiser for the knock-out Women's World Championship in 2016, the new Women's World Champion will be crowned in 2017.

Ju Wenjun will then challenge this new Women's World Champion.

The winner...

... shed tears of joy

 

All games

 

 

Final standings

Rg. Titel Name Land ELO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Pkt. Perf. Wtg.
1 GM Wenjun Ju
 
2580   1 1 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 7.5 / 11 2589 36.50
2 IM Nino Batsiashvili
 
2489 0   ½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 0 ½ 1 6.5 / 11 2552 33.25
3 IM Sarasadat Khademalsharieh
 
2435 0 ½   ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 6.0 / 11 2524 31.50
4 GM Alexandra Kosteniuk
 
2555 1 0 ½   0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 6.0 / 11 2514 31.25
5 GM Valentina Gunina
 
2525 0 1 0 1   ½ 1 0 0 1 ½ 1 6.0 / 11 2517 30.75
6 GM Dronavalli Harika
 
2543 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½   ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 6.0 / 11 2515 30.25
7 WGM Olga Girya
 
2450 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½   ½ 0 1 1 1 6.0 / 11 2523 29.75
8 GM Natalia Zhukova
 
2448 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 ½   ½ ½ ½ 1 5.5 / 11 2491  
9 GM Bela Khotenashvili
 
2426 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 ½   ½ 0 ½ 5.0 / 11 2462  
10 IM Lela Javakhishvili
 
2461 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½   ½ ½ 4.5 / 11 2427 24.25
11 WGM Natalija Pogonina
 
2492 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 ½   ½ 4.5 / 11 2425 23.75
12 IM Almira Skripchenko
 
2455 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½   2.5 / 10 2292  

 

Final standings of the Grand Prix series 2015-16

Rank Player Rating Total
1  Ju Wenjun (China) 2580 413,3
2  Koneru Humpy (India) 2557 335,0
3  Valentina Gunina (Russia) 2525 287,0
4  Alexandra Kosteniuk (Russia) 2555 277,0
5  Dronavalli Harika (India) 2543 272,0
6  Zhao Xue (China) 2508 250,0
7  Nino Batsiashvili (Georgia) 2489 245,0
8  Anna Muzychuk (Ukraine) 2561 223,3
9  Mariya Muzychuk (Ukraine) 2532 220,0
10  Sarasadat Khademalsharieh (Iran) 2435 212,0
11  Nana Dzagnidze (Georgia) 2507 205,0
12  Natalia Pogonina (Russia) 2492 195,0
13  Antoaneta Stefanova (Bulgaria) 2512 173,3
14  Hou Yifan (China) 2635 160,0
15  Olga Girya (Russia) 2450 157,0
16  Natalia Zhukova (Ukraine) 2448 140,0
17  Pia Cramling (Sweden) 2461 125,0
18  Bela Khotenashvili (Georgia) 2426 110,0
19  Almira Skripchenko (France) 2455 110,0
20  Lela Javakhishvili (Georgia) 2461 100,0
21  Elina Danielian (Armenia) 2444 20,0
22  Tan Zhongyi (China) 2492 20,0

Photos: Tournament page

Tournament page



André Schulz started working for ChessBase in 1991 and is an editor of ChessBase News.
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antoine C antoine C 12/8/2016 01:19
it is well known that the Polgar sisters played in very few Women tournaments or championships
antoine C antoine C 12/8/2016 01:14
in equestrian sports, women compete with men (and often win)
basler88 basler88 12/6/2016 05:49
BeachBum2 I agree with you in physical sports, however we don't talk here physical sports and I'm sure many of the women in a mental sports are more advanced as men. They are mach more rational as men in many things they are doing. I know loosing to a women in any thing, the men's world still can't handle it, just the newest exemple, the American Election, Pig Trump would have diet if he had lost against a women.
BeachBum2 BeachBum2 12/6/2016 03:20
Having separate, woman only tournaments and championship is done to bring at least some publicity, fame, respect to women's chess. I do not understand what would be a point of moving towards mixed tournaments if women would be at the bottom in the results table in all important tournaments? Women (in most sports) make less $ - it is also natural, as people want to see the best, not "number 200 something" (and it is a lot worse in actual physical sports).

Most other sports do not even allow woman to play against men, as it would make no sense. Women are great in a lot of other things, competing against men (on top level) in sports is just not one of them and it is not something we can change soon (w/o messing up with genes etc).

There are some youtube videos about a pair (men/woman) playing rapid against other pair (each player making every other turn, no communications allowed) - I thought it was quite fun to watch, maybe we could have more things like those.
basler88 basler88 12/5/2016 09:42
Really??? Olympic, Men's WC, etc., etc!
chessdrummer chessdrummer 12/5/2016 08:18
There are no "Men's" events. Those events are "Open" and women are eligible to compete in them. There are only "Women's" events and prizes.
basler88 basler88 12/5/2016 08:05
Congratulations Ju, great Job and I'm excited you won the whole Grand Prix!!! I fully support the opinion from "riccardo", why do we still separate the Men & the Women? In what century to we live? Are the boys afraid they get there buds clicked one in a wile, it would help both sexes to get better and be more ambitious and maybe the too many draws would disappear. A win-win for chess!
Denix Denix 12/5/2016 02:39
Congratulations!
riccardo riccardo 12/5/2016 02:34
"the Fide found no organiser for the knock-out Women's World Championship in 2016" ....
well, what a surprise .... that usually tend to happen when you do not understand the meaning of "marketing incentive", as opposed to "cash cow". FIDE treats all major events as cash-generators, by exacting extortionate fees.
The main problem in this case is that the Top Woman Player lags below the 100th place in the general rankings.
In other words, the Women WCC would be equivalent to a Soccer World Championship for teams that didn't qualify for the qualifiers to the World Cup (if such a thing was possible).
Who would buy into such event ? Yes, the same number that bought into the knock-out Women WCC.
How about promoting the growth Women chess in a more sensible way - say investing in open events where Women could have a chance to play the top guys more regularly, instead of carrying on the old, failed policy of segregated events ?
We're back to the pre-Polgar situation. Quite depressing.


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