Garry Kasparov: Winter is Coming

1/2/2016 – One thing one cannot say about the 13th World Chess Champion: that he is timid and reserved. In an interview with SPIEGEL, Europe's most influential news magazine, Garry Kasparov calls Vladimir Putin a dictator and accuses the West of capitulating in the face of the Kremlin's aggressive foreign policy. This and hundreds of stories in the broadsheets were sparked by the release of his latest book.

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'Putin Needs Wars To Legitimize His Position'

Interview with Garry Kasparov

Garry Kasparov, 52, is the son of an Armenian-Jewish couple and grew up in Baku, Azerbaijan, when it was still part of the Soviet Union. Talent scouts had already recognized his chess genius at preschool age and, at 22, he became the youngest-ever world champion chess player. Kasparov retired from competitive chess in 2005, despite still being ranked as the best player in the world, and began a second career in politics.

Kasparov became chairman of the United Civil Front and then headed The Other Russia, a coalition opposing President Vladimir Putin. Despite being the group's presidential candidate, he felt compelled to resign in 2007. His campaign appearances were being disrupted, he was being attacked by paid thugs and was detained and put in jail for a short period of time after holding a protest that had not received official allowance.

In 2012, Kasparov succeeded former Czech President Václav Havel as chairman of the New York-based Human Rights Foundation. Fearing he would be stripped of his Russian passport, he went into exile abroad. Today, he divides his time between the United States and Croatia with his wife and two children.

In March, Kasparov testified before the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations about Putin's policies. He warned the Americans against treating Putin like a normal political partner with whom one can negotiate. Kasparov is considered the sharpest critic of the Kremlin in the West. His new book, "Winter Is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must Be Stopped," has just been published in English and German.

In an interview with SPIEGEL, Kasparov discusses Putin's power politics and what he describes as the West's moral capitulation.

Note: The print edition of Der SPIEGEL (right) with the interview, 46/2015, hit the newsstands on November 7, 2015 – two days before the 30th anniversary of Kasparov's victory over Anatoly Karpov, on November 9th, 1985. It was also the week in which his book, Winter is Coming, appeared in German translation. All very appropriate – and auspicious.


SPIEGEL: Mr. Kasparov, you call Vladimir Putin the greatest threat to world peace. Don't we need the Russian president's help now more than ever to end wars and contain terrorism?

Kasparov: Russia is a mafia state today, and Putin is its top godfather. The regime is in trouble economically and can no longer offer anything to its citizens. That's why Putin has to pursue an aggressive foreign policy, so he can serve his people the fairy tale of Russian pride and regaining its strength as a major power. But he uses fascist propaganda to do so. From Ukraine to Syria, he is behaving like the world's new general and celebrating victories, while the American president sits on the sidelines and Europe sleeps. The West's behavior toward Putin is political and moral capitulation.

SPIEGEL: Now you're really exaggerating.

Kasparov: No, I'm not. People would have been shaking their heads in disbelief if someone had predicted, 15 months ago, that Putin would annex Crimea and grossly violate European postwar borders. Then came the expansion into eastern Ukraine, and now the direct military intervention in the Syrian war, on the side of mass murderer Bashar Assad. Putin needs wars to legitimize his position. It's the only move he has left. And his appearance before the United Nations General Assembly in late September is typical for action and counter reaction.

SPIEGEL: What do you mean?

Kasparov: Putin spoke unabashedly about the importance of national sovereignty in Syria, a concept apparently near and dear to his heart, unless it comes to the sovereignty of Georgia, Ukraine or any other country in which he intervenes. Then he offered his cooperation, but without making any concrete concessions at all. And he didn't have to, either. He knows what he can rely on. He has assets that are more valuable than words: He has tanks in Ukraine, fighter jets in Syria -- and Barack Obama in the White House. His speech before the UN only an hour earlier was completely toothless. The West can't come up with anything to deal with Moscow, except appeasement.

SPIEGEL: A term that describes former British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's policy, which emboldened the Nazis to invade Poland in 1938. You aren't seriously comparing Putin with Hitler and Obama with Chamberlain, are you?

Kasparov: I'm aware of how sensitive these appeasement comparisons are, especially in Germany. But I do think there are unmistakable parallels. Many politicians in the West cling to the notion of a partnership with Russia. They want to include Putin, make compromises and constantly negotiate new deals with him. But history has taught us that the longer we pursue appeasement and do nothing, the higher the price will be later on. Dictators don't ask "Why?" before they seize even more power. They ask: "Why not?"

SPIEGEL: But the West did react decisively and sharply to the annexation of Crimea. Some say too sharply. Russia was excluded from the G-8 group until further notice, and the European Union and United States were unusually united in imposing economic sanctions on Russia and travel restrictions on politicians and business owners with ties to the Kremlin.

Kasparov: I welcome that, in principle. But the sanctions and travel restrictions would have to be far more comprehensive to be truly painful for Putin and his inner circle. And the new middle class should also feel the effects of what he is doing. For instance, we should ask those who wish to enter the EU whether they have visited illegally occupied Crimea in the last few months and, if the answer is "yes," deny them a visa. We are living in a new ice age, and we need to apply the recipes of the Cold War to the Kremlin. That means isolation instead of offers of negotiation. And Ukraine should have been supplied with weapons long ago.

SPIEGEL: Achieve peace with even more weapons?

Kasparov: The country has to be able to defend itself. I'm only talking about defensive weapons.

SPIEGEL: But the most hopeful approach to peace in Ukraine is the Minsk Agreement, which includes Moscow. The nuclear deal with Iran would not have materialized without Putin's participation. And despite all the necessary criticism of his policies, Russia is an essential element, especially in bringing peace to Syria.

Kasparov: Yes, I know, the so-called realpolitik. But a values-oriented foreign policy of the free world would be much better, supported by the self-awareness of being on the right side of history. Putin has this animalistic instinct of all dictators: He smells weakness. To quote Winston Churchill's definition of appeasement: "An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last."

SPIEGEL: Have you always been convinced that Putin would plunge your country into disaster?

Kasparov: When Putin, a former lieutenant-colonel in the KGB, became Russia's president on December 31, 1999 -- eight years after the failed coup attempt against (then Soviet leader Mikhail) Gorbachev, and eight years after the people had torn down the statue of Felix Dzerzhinsky, the hated founder of the KGB, in Moscow -- it was admittedly a shock. Nevertheless, I decided to give Putin a chance. He seemed dynamic and capable of learning. But I had to bury my hopes after just a few months. He proved to be an autocrat -- and, because the West let him do as he pleased, he became a dictator.

SPIEGEL: Isn't that a bit too black and white? Didn't the West, with the eastern expansion of NATO, break an important promise to Moscow and humiliate Russia? Didn't the EU make mistakes when it came to Ukraine and unnecessarily challenged the Kremlin?

Kasparov: I don't see this as humiliation. The Eastern European countries joined the military alliance of their own free will. And Ukraine wanted and still wants to go its own way. Moscow is simply unwilling to recognize the right of self-determination of these nations.

SPIEGEL: You recently called for Putin to be tried before the International Criminal Court. But what about former US President George W. Bush, who is responsible for an invasion of Iraq that violated international law and was based on lies, and the thousands of thousands of deaths he caused?

Kasparov: I'm not saying that George W. Bush did everything right. But even if you take a skeptical view of his Iraq war, Obama made the more serious error of withdrawing his troops from Iraq early. That allowed the horrible terrorist militia Islamic State (IS) to gain ground.

SPIEGEL: If Putin is now saying that he wants to fight IS and bomb its positions, shouldn't you welcome his actions?

Kasparov: But he isn't doing that, or if he is, only marginally. He is mainly bombing the rebels who are fighting dictator Bashar Assad. Putin wants to keep Assad in power and expand his own military base in Syria, whatever the cost. I even believe he has an interest in more and more people fleeing the country. The flow of refugees improves his negotiating position toward the West, including the German chancellor. By the way, he has more respect for her than any other Western politician. He despises most of the others. He mainly has friends in Europe among the extreme right, such as Marine Le Pen's Front National in France.

SPIEGEL: Putin, together with his military, has jumped into the Middle Eastern powder keg. Does he have any idea how to get out again?

Kasparov: It could truly be the case that he has miscalculated in the long term with his adventure in Syria.

SPIEGEL: The IS terrorist militia is claiming it bombed a Russian holiday airline flying out of Sharm el-Sheikh over the Sinai peninsula on Oct. 31, killing all 224 people on board. If it does turn out to be a terrorist act, how do you think the Russian people will respond?

Kasparov: We know little so far. Putin has much to gain by blaming it on IS instead of Russia's crumbling infrastructure. Revenge for a terror attack is ideal for Putin's model. His propaganda machine will be filled with scenes of crash victims if Putin sees the need for a larger war to stoke his domestic support again as the Russian economy teeters.

SPIEGEL: But the Syria mission isn't hurting him yet. On the contrary, he is enjoying widespread approval. The new winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, Svetlana Alexievich, has said that there is a little Putin in every Russian.

Kasparov: Wait a minute. I had the privilege of meeting Andrei Sakharov …

SPIEGEL: … the nuclear physicist and human rights activist, who was banished to a gulag from 1980 to 1986 for promoting human rights.

Kasparov: And one of my best friends was Boris Nemtsov …

SPIEGEL: … the opposition politician who was shot to death on February 27, 2015, within view of the Kremlin.

Kasparov: There was definitely no trace of a Mafioso or dictator in those two men, and no trace of a Putin. And the tens of thousands who took to the streets in recent years to protest government despotism in Russia were also not infected by the virus of tyranny. I was happy to see the prize go to this committed writer, who has given a voice to many of my fellow Russians in her books. But it isn't quite as simple as she puts it, even though I have an idea of what Alexievich is getting at.

SPIEGEL: She probably means the Russians' special yearning for a strongman and their susceptibility to authoritarian structures. Is she wrong?

Kasparov: I don't really like discussions about a supposed Russian national character.

SPIEGEL: Nevertheless, polls put mass murderer Stalin at the top of the list of the best politicians in Russian history. Putin's approval ratings are also around 80 percent at the moment.

Kasparov: I wouldn't place much stock in those numbers. I don't believe that they reflect Putin's true popularity. Just think about how the pollsters proceed. They call people and they ask them questions on the street. In today's Russia, it takes a lot of courage to tell a stranger something critical about the head of the Kremlin. And yet more than 20 percent do so nonetheless.

SPIEGEL: You have dedicated your new book to Boris Nemtsov, with whom you founded the extra-parliamentary opposition movement Solidarnost in December 2008. He stayed in Russia to keep fighting there. You chose to go into exile.

Kasparov: There were clear signs that they were going to confiscate my passport, and my mother was receiving unannounced visits. Boris and I began to argue after Putin's return to the presidency in 2012. In my opinion, there was no longer a realistic chance to achieve regime change through peaceful political means, or real elections. Boris, on the other hand, never lost this hope. He felt that my assessment was premature and said: "You have to live a long time to see changes in Russia." He was deprived of that opportunity.

SPIEGEL: The Kremlin claims it intends to use all means possible to clear up the murder, and it sent condolences to the family.

Kasparov: The height of cynicism. There is no doubt that Putin is responsible for this crime, whether or not he gave the order to commit the murder himself. Putin created the conditions and atmosphere that have made this kind of thing possible.

SPIEGEL: Aren't you worried about your own safety? This interview is taking place in London, where another Putin critic, former KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko, was poisoned with polonium nine years ago. According to British investigations, the material definitely came from a Russian factory.

Kasparov: I'm not paranoid, but I am cautious. I don't drink tea with strangers, I don't fly Aeroflot and I avoid certain countries with close ties to Russia.

SPIEGEL: What would happen if you returned to Moscow tomorrow?

Kasparov: I now have Croatian citizenship, but I only accepted it because Croatia allowed me to keep my Russian passport. In other words, I could go back, theoretically. My mother lives in Moscow, and I would like to visit her. Now she always has to travel to Finland or a Baltic country to meet me. But I have to expect that my papers would be confiscated in Moscow immediately, and that they would harass my family. I can still have more impact in the West with my books and lectures.

SPIEGEL: What makes you so optimistic? Did you deliberately time your new book to coincide with the American presidential primaries?

Kasparov: Yes, I did have the election in mind when it came to publishing. I hope that the Russian policy will play a big role in the election. And I also hope that my arguments will be heard.

SPIEGEL: Republican Senator John McCain has just euphorically praised your book.

Kasparov: I don't make any secret of the fact that I'm closer to the Republicans than to the Democrats. But even under a President Hillary Clinton, US foreign policy toward Moscow would probably be more critical and confrontational. I hope it isn't too late for that. I would like to travel to my country again, to a country without a dictatorship, to a post-Putin Russia.

SPIEGEL: When will it come to that?

Kasparov: The bad news is: I don't know. The good news is: Putin doesn't know either. His aggression is like a drug. He has to keep upping the dose, which increases the risks for him. Dictatorships sometimes fall unexpectedly and quickly. And Putin knows that for him, the loss of power doesn't mean a comfortable retirement, but something completely different.

SPIEGEL: Are you saying he's afraid of criminal prosecution or worse?

Kasparov: Putin fears the kind of end (former Libyan leader Moammar) Gadhafi suffered in Libya.

SPIEGEL: Could you imagine playing a key role in a future Russia?

Kasparov: I don't think about possible positions. But I certainly want to be involved in politics and help shape the transition. I am in contact with regime critics who had to leave for the West. One of them is Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the former businessman, who had to endure 10 years in a prison camp.

SPIEGEL: One of your books is called "How Life Imitates Chess." Are there things chess can teach you about the big game of world politics?

Kasparov: Putin is more of a poker player. In poker, unlike chess, you can effectively compensate for a very weak hand by bluffing. There are fixed rules in chess, and no one knows how the game will end. Things are currently the other way around in Putin's realm. But it won't stay that way forever. I'm looking forward to the day when my country is saved -- and the current winner becomes a loser.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Kasparov, we thank you for this interview.

Source: SPIEGEL Online. The interview was conducted by senior editor
Dr. Erich Follath and is reproduced with kind permission of the author.

Note that Garry always welcomes comments on his entertaining personal Twitter: @Kasparov63

Garry Kasparov's new book

The ascension of Vladimir Putin – a former lieutenant colonel of the KGB – to the presidency of Russia in 1999 should have been a signal that the country was headed away from democracy. Yet in the intervening years – as America and the world's other leading powers have continued to appease him – Putin has grown not only into a dictator but a global threat. With his vast resources and nuclear weapons, Putin is at the center of a worldwide assault on political liberty.

For Garry Kasparov, none of this is news. He has been a vocal critic of Putin for over a decade, even leading the pro-democracy opposition to him in the farcical 2008 Presidential election. Yet years of seeing his Cassandra-like prophecies about Putin's intentions fulfilled have left Kasparov with the realization of a darker truth: Putin's Russia, like ISIS or Al Qaeda, defines itself in opposition to the free countries of the world. He is still fighting the Cold War, even as Americans have first moved beyond it, and over time, forgotten its lessons.

Lest we be drawn into another prolonged conflict, Kasparov now urges a forceful stand – diplomatic and economic – against him. For as long as the world's powerful democracies continue to recognize and negotiate with Putin, he can maintain credibility in his home country. He faces few strong enemies within his country, so meaningful opposition must come from abroad.

Argued with the force of Kasparov's world-class intelligence, conviction, and hopes for his home country, Winter is Coming is an unmistakable call to action against a threat we've ignored for too long.

You can order Kasparov's book in hardcover for $20 or paperback for $10 at Amazon, Barnes & Nobel, or IndiBound. It is also available for Kindle ($13.81) and Nook ($15.49).

The German version, "Warum wir Putin stoppen müssen" is available at Amazon for €22.99.

Links to other articles and reviews of Kasparov's book

Bloomberg: 'Winter Is Coming': Charlie Rose


Topics Kasparov, Spiegel
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BestByTest2 BestByTest2 1/7/2016 05:22
After reading Kasparov's first answers I skipped to the comments section, and then I wanted to refrain from commenting. - But then I just gave a short look to the rest of Kasparov's answers and after reading his comment about the victims of the plane crash on Sinai I really have to write this now: Kasparov has totally lost it. Sad. Very.
sparbax sparbax 1/6/2016 11:12
I think the number of russian internet trolls commenting in this thread is ample proof that Garry Kasparov is right on target. Putin must be stopped, not only for all the neghbouring countries sake, but for the sake of the people in Russia. He is a true danger to the world.

I also look forward to the day when the troll factories are closed down...
Rybka2-Beater Rybka2-Beater 1/5/2016 09:14
The illustration is one chosen by the magazine, Der Spiegel. It has nothing to do with Garry or his book.
Kingpawnkid Kingpawnkid 1/5/2016 05:57
You could agree or disagree with Kasparov comments but in my opinion Putin's image receiving bullets on target I think is an way too far invitation
Catewary Catewary 1/4/2016 05:28
I really like Garry the chessplayer, but really dislike Garry the incompetent politician. It is sufficient to read his completely twisted understanding of the situation in Syria to realize this guy does not have a clue what he is talking about. He calls Nusra (Al Qaeda) and other Salafi jihadi cutthroats from 100+ countries the legitimate opposition to Bashar. No man is either black or white, Putin included - well, Garry's world is all black or white. Having read this Spiegel account, one is hard pressed to give him any political credibility. Sorry, Garry, but you are a patzer in politics. Stick to advocating and developing chess, you are one of the all time best.
GrandGuignol GrandGuignol 1/4/2016 03:49
It's an incredible amount of bullshits that Kasparov tells to Spiegel, out of this world and deserving direct admission to some asylum . Embarassing how he tampers with reality, but don't worry, it's all calculated, by a stooge of huge political circles with a world war in agenda . Better if the site keeps him out and talk about chess
sunnyside sunnyside 1/3/2016 10:23
Garry has a point here, open your eyes and see.
people who read daily news will agree with him.

His only problem is that he want to checkmate now. keep it up Garry!!!!
Rybka2-Beater Rybka2-Beater 1/3/2016 09:23
Garry has reservations about Trump. And Trump views Garry as a bit of a Putin-apologist. However, dialog may become possible.
ChessTalk ChessTalk 1/3/2016 09:21
Somehow, I don't think Garry has his fingers on the pulse of the republican party. It ain't McCain.
Rybka2-Beater Rybka2-Beater 1/3/2016 07:59
Haha. At least AlphaOMG was a little amusing in its nonsensical delusions.

Well, the double-digiters are happy in their conspiracy-dominated (and most of these are fantasies or coincidences) world.

And I am happy because that keeps them way outside my world, which is the world.

Their only role is for them to lose their money to me on the stockmarket etc., and of course for them to lose at chess too, when I feel indulgent.
frideslameris frideslameris 1/3/2016 03:38
Great chessplayer he is but he seems to be carrying over his relentless ches style into politics. Does not work. A few years ago Kasparov showed up as a guest speaker during a Bilderberg Conference. Bilderberg is a completley undemocratic corporate interest driven collection of elite businessmen who were exposed by Daniel Estulin in 2010 in a press conference at the European Parliament. Just google:
Bombshell: Estulin unmasks Bilderberg Group in EU Parliament. A useful article on Kasparov and Bilderberg you can find on the American website Infowar.com
tom_70 tom_70 1/3/2016 03:10
@Rybka2cheater

As an American, I could not care less what happens in Russia. From what I can tell, Putin has approval ratings that any other politician in the world would love to have. The vast majority of the Russian people really like him and approve of the job he is doing. So Kasparov just needs to quit crying about it.


yesenadam yesenadam 1/3/2016 02:47
Rybka2-Beater, you really might want to control your contempt for people a bit before you try advising people (presumably) that they should be more like you. Evidently you can't see it, but almost every one of your sentences drips with contempt for your fellow citizens. It's pretty horrible.
Darkergreen1327 Darkergreen1327 1/3/2016 01:51
How many times do you have to promote this book on your "chess-news" site? We know your ties with GK but please just keep it related to chess.
DaTribe DaTribe 1/3/2016 12:19
Is Kasparov a freemason?
CostaMaison3 CostaMaison3 1/3/2016 11:56
Kasparov is an excellent chess model in many different aspects but a poor hatred model to study. Kasparov works differently than the Russian oppositions, he has no social activities. Furthermore, he opposites Putin not the current Russian regime. The Russian oppositions described his politics activities and behaviors as doubtful.
ubernomics ubernomics 1/3/2016 10:44
Kirsan is merely curiously semi-competent, rather than corrupt, evil, or wholly incompetent. We understand "the West" goes after him only because he's a perceived ally of Putin.

Theoretically, FIDE could be better run. But Kasparov has shown he is not the better man. Even in the United States, there is little corporate advertising. The reality is that chess is simply not a huge money-making sport like soccer (or whatever the FIDE guys hope to copy), and will be financially so-so.

As an aside, some insecure chess nerds caused chess to take a very wrong turn by trying to copy world soccer (especially in tournament format for the Championship, which still plagues the women's).

And these true autistics still try to get chess into the Olympics (seriously, WTF?!)

I've always thought that in the Information Age where "geek is chic", chess should be marketed as the premier mind game, as the "Game of Kings", and not as wanna-be soccer.

Chess should place its own category, above the physical sports, and not mix in the dirt with "dumb jocks".

I'm sure the Kasparov side is reading this, but also hoping Kirsan/FIDE side, too, stops the Olympics baloney and adopts a new marketing slogan along those lines.
Paranga75 Paranga75 1/3/2016 04:17
I wonder why the best chess site in the world keeps promoting Kasparov, a man of hatred. So many humble and elegant players to advertise rather than him
ulyssesganesh ulyssesganesh 1/3/2016 02:00
how nice it will be if garry confines himself to chess!
quantentunnel quantentunnel 1/3/2016 01:10
The comments here give me hope that this world is not yet lost - despite all the media deception on all channels in the west people still seem to be able to think for themselves.
ubernomics ubernomics 1/3/2016 01:08
Dear Gary:

I shall never forgive you for almost succeeding in banning the lovely Russian women from the Chess Olympiad (and top seed, no less.) Such unsporting behavior! Such unchivalrous behavior! Even barbarian sackers of cities of olden times only kill all the men - is that not enough??
PEB216 PEB216 1/2/2016 11:46
Most assuredly read Kasparov's latest book, and, while you are at it, read Jean Raspail's novel "Camp of the Saints." The latter book, although written decades ago, probably has an even more important warning for the people of Europe.
M_Ali M_Ali 1/2/2016 11:46
Kasparov is a puppet of western capitalism and zionism.
He calles Putin a dictator and Assad a mass murderer.But tells nothing about thousands of radical terrorists backed by the west,some muslim countries and Israel which came from say 50 countries to Syria for overthrowing Bashar Assad and the ruling Baath Party.
Putin makes a great job for fighting those terrosists who openly say that they want to commit ethnical and religious cleansing and want to take large parts of the world to dark middle ages.
daniel.quigley@mail.com daniel.quigley@mail.com 1/2/2016 11:12
I was surprised to read alucas's comment that things are better in Russia now than when Putin took over, but according to Wikipedia: "Approximately 12.8% of Russians lived below the national poverty line in 2011, significantly down from 40% in 1998 at the worst point of the post-Soviet collapse. Unemployment in Russia was 5.4% in 2014, down from about 12.4% in 1999. The middle class has grown from just 8 million persons in 2000 to 104 million persons in 2013." I must concede that economically things appear much improved in Russia.
daniel.quigley@mail.com daniel.quigley@mail.com 1/2/2016 11:05
I give Kasparov a lot of credit for bravery. Top chess players are international travelers. They see much of what is going on in other countries and the rest of the world. Nevertheless, Kasparov is the only Russian with sufficient courage to call Putin out for what he is! Why is Kasparov the only courageous Russian chess player taking a stand against tyranny and dictatorship even among those who long ago left Russia and ostensibly have nothing to lose?
alucas alucas 1/2/2016 10:57
Mr. Kasparov is among the greatest chess players, if not THE greatest player ever in the history of the game. But in plitics, it’s a totally different story, he is a nobody. Worse that that, we he run for office against Putin, he had no clear stategy, no significant policy for Russia, it was just uniting all opposition against Putin, from far left to far right. His western influence, distance with every-day russian issues, absence of clear strategy and program to help improve Russia’s GDP and standard of living has denied him public support and credibility. And he will never gain it back…
But Gary Kasarov hates to loose and fights…
But his arguments haven’t much evolved with the years, it’s just his hatred for everything that is linked to Vladimir Putin. His world has turned into a happy binary club, where all that is against Putin is wondeful, everything that is NOT against Putin is promised hell on earth. Hatred compensates for absence of political program. Geopolitical analysis? should be a part of “How life imitates chess”, but it seems to me that Kasparov is simply too blinded by hatred to be able to produce any smart analysis of the situation in Russia, which by the way has improved a lot since the arrival of Vladimir Putin…
J Nayer J Nayer 1/2/2016 10:52
Kasparov was a chess player. He moves wooden pieces on a board, interesting as it may be it tells you nothing about the world. For the rest he knows nothing. He has no degree in anything, no expertise, when he ran for office his party got no votes. He finds no support for his rhetoric anywhere - except with John McCain and some insane republicans. God thank no one pays attention. They report on everything here. When Kasparov received a ban from FIDE a couple of months ago there was nothing about it. Ah, honesty.
strategos78 strategos78 1/2/2016 10:22
I don't agree with the last comment. We're not politicians, we're citizens. It's sometines necessary to express your opinion. Not double talk. People are dying... Kasparov is right to say what he thinks directly.
tom_70 tom_70 1/2/2016 09:44
The problem with Kasparov is that he is so direct, so confrontational, that he lacks any sort of diplomacy. He does not know how to get what he wants without beating someone over the head to get it. His style leads to world war in the fastest way possible.
World politics is NOT a chess game.
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