Elista R11: Kasimdzhanov beats Inarkiev with black

12/27/2008 – That was the only decisive game in round eleven: Uzbek GM Rustam Kasimdzhanov defeated his Russian colleague Ernesto Inarkiev in a convoluted 86-move game. Since all other games were drawn the table has not changed. It has Jakovenko, Radjabov and Grischuk in the lead. In a new and interesting FIDE questionnaire the players were asked their opinion about computer cheating.

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FIDE Grand Prix in Elista 2008

The Third FIDE Grand Prix tournament is taking place in Elista from December 13 to 29, 2008. Despite the recent withdrawals (Carlsen, Adams) and the absence of players like Anand, Kramnik and Topalov the tournament is very strong, with a category of 19. The venue, originally Doha, is now "City Chess" in Elista, Kalmykia.

Results

Round 11: Friday, December 26, 2008

Ernesto Inarkiev
0-1
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Vugar Gashimov
½-½
Dmitry Jakovenko
Pavel Eljanov
½-½
Peter Leko
Evgeny Alekseev
½-½
Shakh. Mamedyarov
Wang Yue
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Vladimir Akopian
½-½
Etienne Bacrot
Alexander Grischuk
½-½
Ivan Cheparinov

Inarkiev,E (2669) - Kasimdzhanov,R (2672) [C92]
FIDE Grand Prix Elista RUS (11), 26.12.2008
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0-0 9.h3 Re8 10.d4 Bb7 11.Nbd2 Bf8 12.Bc2 Nb8 13.b3 g6 14.a4 Nbd7 15.Ba3 c6 16.Nf1 Qc7 17.Ng3 Rad8 18.Qd2 Bg7 19.Rad1 c5 20.d5 bxa4 21.bxa4 a5 22.Qe3 Ba6 23.Nd2 Rb8 24.Ngf1 Nb6 25.Bb3 Nh5 26.c4 Rb7 27.Qc3 Nd7 28.Ne3 Nhf6 29.Rc1 Bh6 30.Qc2 Reb8 31.Ba2 Nb6 32.Bb3 Bf4 33.g3 Bh6 34.Kg2 Qd7 35.Rb1 Ra7 36.Qc3 Bc8 37.Rh1 Rbb7 38.Ra1 Qe8 39.Ng4?! Bxg4 40.hxg4

40...Nbxd5! 41.cxd5 Bxd2 42.Qd3 (42.Qxd2 Rxb3) 42...Bg5 43.f3 h5 44.gxh5 Nxh5 45.Bc4 Qxa4 46.Bxc5 Rb2+ 47.Bf2 Qd7 48.Ra2 Rab7 49.Qa3 Rxa2 50.Qxa2 Qc7 51.Rd1 Qb8 52.Qxa5 Rb2 53.Qe1 Kg7 54.Kg1 Qc8 55.Bf1 Qc2 56.Bd3 Qa4 57.Ra1 Qb3 58.Rb1 Bd8 59.Rxb2 Qxb2 60.Qe2 Qc1+ 61.Qe1 Qb2 62.Qe2 Qb4 63.Qe3?

63...Nxg3! If the bishop retakes Black has the skewer 64...Bb6. 64.f4 exf4 65.Qxf4 Nh5 66.Qe3. For the second time in this game Rustam Kasimdzhanov is a healthy pawn up, with good winning chances. 66...Kg8 67.Kg2 Qb2 68.Be2 Qxe2. Why not 68...Bb6 69.Qxb6 Qxe2 and if 70.Qxd6 Qxe4+ 71.Kh2 Nf4 72.Kg3 Nxd5 and Black is two pawns up. In any case "Kasim" knows how to play this ending. 69.Qxe2 Nf4+ 70.Kf3 Nxe2 71.Kxe2 Bf6 72.Kf3 Be5 73.Kg4 f6 74.Be3 Kf7 75.Kf3 Ke7 76.Ke2 Kd7 77.Kd3 Kc7 78.Kc4 Kb7 79.Kb5 g5 80.Bg1 g4 81.Bf2 g3 82.Be3 g2 83.Bg1 Bb2 84.Ka4 Ka6 85.Kb4 Be5 86.Kc4 Ka5 0-1.

Standings after eleven rounds


Is computer cheating control necessary at world championship tournaments?

Questionnaire conducted by FIDE

  • Alexander Grischuk: At world championship matches all the anti-cheating measures should be strict. Only two players take part in it and it is possible to check all the attempts of computer cheating. All the measures are possible: regular searching that provides no results, some transmission jamming devices. What ways of transmitting data to the player do we have? I don’t think players receive SMS via their mobile phones. Actually there can be two ways of cheating. First, one can use a small earphone to receive computer advice, but in this case it the process can be easily checked with jamming devices. Second, some electronic set transmitting data with the help of Morse code by way of tapping your leg is possible. To prevent this it is necessary to search the players before entering the playing hall. I believe that if a player uses computer assistance, it will be difficult to play with him at the board. That is why grandmasters shouldn’t treat the searching before the game as something humiliating.

  • Rustam Kasimdzhanov: There are many methods of the computer cheatings. I have read whole books dedicated to the question how to use the computer help in chess. Many articles were published. If I am not mistaken the morse alphabet method, mentioned by Grischuk, is called tactile. Generally, I can say, there is a whole science on this subject. If we talk about our tournament, the organizers haven’t undertaken the task to prevent all possible computer cheatings. I think that as long as players hve contact with audience, all search, detectors, jammers have no meaning because the audience, i.e. the people who are in cahoot with the player, can use signals, as it practiced in card games. In order to avoid all kind of cheatings, it is necessary to isolate the players from the audience. Besides, one should thoroughly examine the players. Because even the room key or the cloakroom ticket can be a disguised transfer device. That is why the player should be allowed to come into the playing hall without anything (the pen should be given by the organizers) and there should no contact with the audience. Moreover, there should be all kinds of jammers and the things like that. Only under all these conditions we can approach the situation when cheating, not only with the help of computer, will become impossible. It is clear that in this case the medicine could be worse that the illness. Anyway as Sasha said, if a person is using computer help it would be not possible to play with him, and all our attempts to avoid the cheating would be ineffective.

  • Teimour Radjabov: There is special equipment which allows you to neutralize all the attempts of the transfer of the electronic information. Probably this equipment is actively used by the secret services. Something similar is used at the world championships. I think that none of the chess players who really achieved something in their life would risk their sport career and cheat. Otherwise, one can be disqualified forever.

  • Evgeny Alexeev: The question is very important. There were some cases in the tournament practice when some chess players used computer’s help from outside. Of course, during the tournaments of the high level, one should use different technical equipment to prevent cheating of the game.

  • Pavel Eljanov: I am not a big specialist in the computer equipment. I know that during Kramnik-Topalov World Championship Match in Elista jammers were used and the players were separated from the audience by a glass wall. I don’t know how effective this is and whether one should make such arrangements at the other tournaments, in particular at tournament like this one in Elista. Besides, all the equipment is quite expensive.

  • Shakhriyar Mamedyarov: I totally agree with Pavel Eljanov on this subject.

  • Ernesto Inarkiev: Computer cheating is a very big problem which will be developed because the technology becomes accessible as well as the competitions with good prize funds. I think that there should be set of measures so the chess players would not be against. To my mind the participants of the tournament should play in the separated hall. It also very important to legitimate the punishment in chess for the computer cheating.

  • Dmitry Jakovenko: I agree that it is very important question, although the debate about computer cheating has quitened down a little. I think that there should be a procedure which would let to find and prove that the player has used the computer during the game.

  • Peter Leko: I think that one should not allow the use of computers during the game. Hardly any of the elite chess players would do this. Chess players should play fairly and I am sure that the majority of the players would not compromise with conscience.

  • Vugar Gashimov: I also think that top chess players hardly will cheat during the game. But in principle if you have a proper technical equipment it would be not difficult to identify someone cheating.

  • Vladimir Akopian: This is really a big problem. Even if there is some suspicion that your opponent is using the computer’s help from outside, it becomes psychologically impossible to play with him. There must be a metal detector for sure. To my mind, it is necessary to cover the playing hall by the electronic cover in order to black out all signals, including the mobile phones. It is often practiced at the concerts, instead of telling everybody to switch off their cell phones. The hall is covered with the invisible cover, and there is no call during the whole concert even if you haven’t switched off the phone. These measures are necessary because there are many cases of computer cheatings. There was a case when I suspected cheating of my opponent. He played too fast in very difficult position. It is possible, but it was suspicious because he used to go out after some quick moves. I wanted also to play quickly in order not him to go away and get the help from outside. We should cope with the problem of the computer help.

  • Ilja Odessky, journalist: There are some scientific data that the electronic cover for the playing hall, mentioned by Akopian, are very unsalutary [detrimental] for the health of those who are in the hall. It can rub off in due time, in years and can course certain illnesses. The grandmasters who can get sick with cancer in some years will sue FIDE for large sum of money.

  • Ivan Cheparinov: Besides the common metal detector, we should need to have the set of measures directed to the prophylaxis and interception of the computer cheating of the chess players who are used to play at the big tournaments.

  • Etienne Bacrot: Certainly, we need to learn how to cope with computer cheating before it gets big resonance in the chess world.

  • Wang Yue: I can only agree with Etienne. We must play chess fairly.


FIDE Grand Prix Elista 2008 – Schedule and results

Round 1: Sunday December 14, 2008

Etienne Bacrot
½-½
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Teimour Radjabov
½-½
Ivan Cheparinov
Shakh. Mamedyarov
½-½
Alexander Grischuk
Peter Leko
½-½
Vladimir Akopian
Dmitry Jakovenko
1-0
Wang Yue
Ernesto Inarkiev
½-½
Evgeny Alekseev
Vugar Gashimov
1-0
Pavel Eljanov

Round 2: Monday, December 15, 2008

Rustam Kasimdzhanov
½-½
Pavel Eljanov
Evgeny Alekseev
½-½
Vugar Gashimov
Wang Yue
½-½
Ernesto Inarkiev
Vladimir Akopian
½-½
Dmitry Jakovenko
Alexander Grischuk
1-0
Peter Leko
Ivan Cheparinov
½-½
Shakh. Mamedyarov
Etienne Bacrot
0-1
Teimour Radjabov

Round 3: Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Teimour Radjabov
1-0
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Shakh. Mamedyarov
½-½
Etienne Bacrot
Peter Leko
1-0
Ivan Cheparinov
Dmitry Jakovenko
½-½
Alexander Grischuk
Ernesto Inarkiev
½-½
Vladimir Akopian
Vugar Gashimov
½-½
Wang Yue
Pavel Eljanov
1-0
Evgeny Alekseev

Round 4: Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Rustam Kasimdzhanov
0-1
Evgeny Alekseev
Wang Yue
1-0
Pavel Eljanov
Vladimir Akopian
½-½
Vugar Gashimov
Alexander Grischuk
½-½
Ernesto Inarkiev
Ivan Cheparinov
½-½
Dmitry Jakovenko
Etienne Bacrot
1-0
Peter Leko
Teimour Radjabov
½-½
Shakh. Mamedyarov

Round 5: Thursday, December 18, 2008

Shakh. Mamedyarov
½-½
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Peter Leko
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Dmitry Jakovenko
½-½
Etienne Bacrot
Ernesto Inarkiev
0-1
Ivan Cheparinov
Vugar Gashimov
1-0
Alexander Grischuk
Pavel Eljanov
½-½
Vladimir Akopian
Evgeny Alekseev
½-½
Wang Yue

Round 6: Saturday, December 20, 2008

Rustam Kasimdzhanov
½-½
Wang Yue
Vladimir Akopian
0-1
Evgeny Alekseev
Alexander Grischuk
1-0
Pavel Eljanov
Ivan Cheparinov
½-½
Vugar Gashimov
Etienne Bacrot
½-½
Ernesto Inarkiev
Teimour Radjabov
½-½
Dmitry Jakovenko
Shakh. Mamedyarov
½-½
Peter Leko

Round 7: Sunday, December 21, 2008

Peter Leko
½-½
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Dmitry Jakovenko
½-½
Shakh. Mamedyarov
Ernesto Inarkiev
1-0
Teimour Radjabov
Vugar Gashimov
½-½
Etienne Bacrot
Pavel Eljanov
1-0
Ivan Cheparinov
Evgeny Alekseev
0-1
Alexander Grischuk
Wang Yue
½-½
Vladimir Akopian

Round 8: Monday, December 22, 2008

Rustam Kasimdzhanov
1-0
Vladimir Akopian
Alexander Grischuk
1-0
Wang Yue
Ivan Cheparinov
1-0
Evgeny Alekseev
Etienne Bacrot
½-½
Pavel Eljanov
Teimour Radjabov
½-½
Vugar Gashimov
Shakh. Mamedyarov
½-½
Ernesto Inarkiev
Peter Leko
½-½
Dmitry Jakovenko

Round 9: Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Dmitry Jakovenko
1-0
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Ernesto Inarkiev
½-½
Peter Leko
Vugar Gashimov
1-0
Shakh. Mamedyarov
Pavel Eljanov
0-1
Teimour Radjabov
Evgeny Alekseev
½-½
Etienne Bacrot
Wang Yue
1-0
Ivan Cheparinov
Vladimir Akopian
½-½
Alexander Grischuk

Round 10: Thursday, December 25, 2008

Rustam Kasimdzhanov
½-½
Alexander Grischuk
Ivan Cheparinov
1-0
Vladimir Akopian
Etienne Bacrot
½-½
Wang Yue
Teimour Radjabov
1-0
Evgeny Alekseev
Shakh. Mamedyarov
1-0
Pavel Eljanov
Peter Leko
1-0
Vugar Gashimov
Dmitry Jakovenko
1-0
Ernesto Inarkiev

Round 11: Friday, December 26, 2008

Ernesto Inarkiev
0-1
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Vugar Gashimov
½-½
Dmitry Jakovenko
Pavel Eljanov
½-½
Peter Leko
Evgeny Alekseev
½-½
Shakh. Mamedyarov
Wang Yue
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Vladimir Akopian
½-½
Etienne Bacrot
Alexander Grischuk
½-½
Ivan Cheparinov

Round 12: Saturday, December 27, 2008

Rustam Kasimdzhanov
-
Ivan Cheparinov
Etienne Bacrot
-
Alexander Grischuk
Teimour Radjabov
-
Vladimir Akopian
Shakh. Mamedyarov
-
Wang Yue
Peter Leko
-
Evgeny Alekseev
Dmitry Jakovenko
-
Pavel Eljanov
Ernesto Inarkiev
-
Vugar Gashimov
GamesReport

Round 13: Sunday, December 28, 2008

Vugar Gashimov
-
Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Pavel Eljanov
-
Ernesto Inarkiev
Evgeny Alekseev
-
Dmitry Jakovenko
Wang Yue
-
Peter Leko
Vladimir Akopian
-
Shakh. Mamedyarov
Alexander Grischuk
-
Teimour Radjabov
Ivan Cheparinov
-
Etienne Bacrot
GamesReport
Monday, December 29, 2008
Departure

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