Chennai 03: How bad was it?

11/12/2013 – The chess world has many things to celebrate: There was an exciting game, Anand, with the black pieces, almost won today, Carlsen looks shaky and not as dominant as he was thought he was going to be before the match. Where does the match go on from now? How will Carlsen fix his problems? We can only wait and see, meanwhile full analysis of today's exciting round.

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FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

GM Daniel King provides his overview of game three:

Round three report by Alejandro Ramirez

If you have turned on the chess internet today then you've heard that Anand had great winning chances today. This is good for many reasons. First, it means there was a real game. Second, it means that Carlsen is looking somewhat vulnerable, which makes the match far closer and far more exciting than many people would have predicted.

The truth is that today the Challenger got outplayed. As he said so himself he made several misjudgmentes in the middlegame. He clearly underestimated Black's plan on the queenside and he was left in a severe disadvantage.

The Arbiter's desk, an important part of the set-up

No emotions lost thanks to the first two rounds.
The third round was exciting and a good omen for what's coming up.

Anand missed his chance today. How many more will he get?

Here's our guest annotators analysis of the game:

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.12"] [Round "3"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A07"] [WhiteElo "2870"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. Nf3 {Despite Magnus' less than stellar opening from the first game, he decides to give 1. Nf3 another go.} d5 2. g3 g6 {Anand also sticks to his guns. } 3. c4 {Here Carlsen deviates, going for a much rarer move than the more standard 3. Bg2 he played in the first game.} dxc4 (3... c6 {is perfectly acceptable here of course, but Anand had another setup in mind.}) 4. Qa4+ (4. Na3 Bg7 5. Nxc4 {looks a bit more testing than the text, though in all likelyhood Black won't have huge problems here either.}) 4... Nc6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. Nc3 (6. O-O e5 {would likely transpose, but White has the option of} 7. Nxe5 $5 Bxe5 8. Bxc6+ bxc6 9. Qxc6+ Bd7 10. Qe4 f6 11. f4 Bf5 {and while this looks fun, it is probably a good thing for the fans that this didn't happen, as it is quite likely the game would conclude here with} 12. Qc6+ Bd7 13. Qe4 Bf5 { etc.}) 6... e5 7. Qxc4 Nge7 8. O-O O-O {Both sides have nearly finished their development, and quite honestly I'm not very impressed with White's opening. The structure is a reverse sicilian which often results from the English, but here Black has absolutely no issues coordinating his pieces and having the dark-squared bishop already fiancettoed is a huge plus.} 9. d3 h6 10. Bd2 Nd4 { This is the first novelty in my database, though the idea is completely standard.} (10... Be6 11. Qa4 Nd4 {is a more common move order, and in fact I think throwing in Be6 before Nd4 looks more logical.} 12. Rfc1 f5 13. Ne1 c5 14. Bxb7 Rb8 15. Bg2 Rxb2 16. Be3 Nxe2+ 17. Nxe2 Rxe2 18. Bxc5 e4 19. d4 f4 20. Rc2 Rxc2 21. Qxc2 e3 22. fxe3 fxe3 23. Qe4 Qd7 24. Nf3 Re8 25. Qxe3 Nf5 26. Qf2 Bd5 27. Re1 Rxe1+ 28. Qxe1 Bxf3 29. Bxf3 Nxd4 30. Bg2 a6 31. Kh1 Qf5 32. Bb6 Kh7 33. a4 a5 34. Qd1 Qe5 35. Qf1 h5 36. Bd8 Qe8 37. Bxa5 Qxa4 38. Bc3 Nf5 39. Bxg7 Kxg7 40. Qc1 {1/2-1/2 (40) Kuzubov,Y (2624)-Negi,P (2607) New Delhi 2011}) 11. Nxd4 exd4 {This trade is generally favorable for Black, as it cements a space advantage in the center and fixes a potential weakness on e2. In order to counter this, White needs to find activity for his pieces.} 12. Ne4 c6 13. Bb4 {It is understandable that White wants to find some activity, but I think this move is slightly imprecise.} (13. Qc1 {forces Black to spend a move defending h6 with} Kh7 {, and now} 14. Bb4 {and White has saved a bit of time compared to the game. Now if Black tries} Be6 {White has} 15. Nc5 {and the bishop has to go back.}) 13... Be6 14. Qc1 Bd5 {With the bishop securing everything on d5, Black is ready to push White back with b6-c5. Already I slightly prefer Anand's position.} 15. a4 b6 16. Bxe7 {This trade is practically forced, as otherwise c5 will be too incovenient for White. Note how if the bishop retreats to d2, f5 traps the e4 knight!} Qxe7 17. a5 Rab8 18. Re1 Rfc8 19. axb6 axb6 20. Qf4 Rd8 21. h4 Kh7 22. Nd2 {The bishop trade would greatly ease the pressure on White's position, but the World Champion has other plans.} Be5 23. Qg4 h5 ({I bet a lot of online fans were groaning here, anticipating the continuation} 23... Be6 24. Qf3 Bd5 $6 {but here White would play} 25. e4 $1 {with excellent chances now that his weakness is eliminated.}) 24. Qh3 Be6 25. Qh1 {It isn't often you see a queen like this, but in reality it isn't so bad since it still influences the center.} c5 26. Ne4 Kg7 27. Ng5 b5 {This move really surprised me when I was watching, but in fact it shows that Anand really knew what was going on here. It might also be because it was around 6 am and I was barely conscious.} (27... Bf5 {taking the time to avoid Nxe6 gives White time to untangle a little.} 28. Be4 Bc8 29. Rec1 {and it is hard to see how Black will actually make progress here.}) 28. e3 {Magnus decides to sacrifice a pawn for activity, an understandable decision but it is hard to say if it was objectively best.} (28. Nxe6+ {looks obvious, but after} Qxe6 {I can see what Magnus didn't like. C4 is going to be quite strong, and his bishop is actually not great on g2 (in such positions, it would almost always rather be on the a2-g8 diagonal, which is impossible here).}) (28. f4 { is hard to play for us non-silicon beings, but perhaps it is the best way to fight.} Bf6 29. Nxe6+ Qxe6 30. Be4 {and at least White might find some counterplay with Qf3-f5 in conjunction with Ra7. That being said, with Black's queenside rolling down the board he still has to be favored.}) 28... dxe3 29. Rxe3 Bd4 (29... Bxb2 {is a cold move, but all of White's attempts at counterplay fail here.} 30. Rae1 Rb6 31. Bd5 Bd4 {and White is in trouble, since after} 32. Rxe6 fxe6 33. Rxe6 {Black has} Qf8 $1 {and the f2 weakness is really felt here.}) 30. Re2 c4 31. Nxe6+ fxe6 32. Be4 {With the strong bishop on e4 and Black's own weaknesses, Carlsen has some hope again.} cxd3 33. Rd2 Qb4 34. Rad1 Bxb2 (34... Rf8 {I prefer going after f2 here, not to mention keeping White's queen out of the game. Now if} 35. Bxd3 Qd6 $1 36. Qg2 Rxf2 37. Rxf2 Rf8 38. Rdd2 Rxf2 39. Rxf2 Bxf2+ 40. Qxf2 Qxd3 {and Black is up a clear pawn with excellent winning chances.}) 35. Qf3 (35. Rxd3 Rxd3 36. Bxd3 {looks safer, but I think Magnus was in some time pressure here, and from a human perspective you don't want to risk losing a chess game with your queen stuck on h1.}) 35... Bf6 36. Rxd3 Rxd3 37. Rxd3 Rd8 {This move completely throws away even the impression of an advantage.} (37... Bd4 {was clearly the best try, and the only explanation is that Anand miscalculated something here.} 38. Qe2 (38. Bxg6 $2 Qe1+ 39. Kg2 Rf8 {and it is over.}) 38... Rf8 39. Rf3 Rxf3 40. Bxf3 Qd6 41. Kg2 b4 {and while White would almost certainly hold due to opposite colored bishops and Black's openish king, Vishy could at least toy with Magnus a bit.}) 38. Rxd8 Bxd8 39. Bd3 {Black can't even hold onto his extra pawn now. After this you can even say White is better due to his structure, but in reality there is no way to take advantage of this with so few pieces left.} Qd4 40. Bxb5 Qf6 41. Qb7+ Be7 42. Kg2 g5 {Vishy liquidates the kingside to ensure the draw.} 43. hxg5 Qxg5 44. Bc4 h4 45. Qc7 hxg3 46. Qxg3 e5 47. Kf3 Qxg3+ 48. fxg3 Bc5 49. Ke4 Bd4 50. Kf5 Bf2 51. Kxe5 Bxg3+ { Finally the fans were treated to a serious battle, and the World Champion showed why we call him that by pushing around the world #1 with the Black pieces. Carlsen managed to escape as he often does, but he will definitely have to rethink his approach with the white pieces.} 1/2-1/2

 

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Carlsen has been trying hard to get his type of positions, but Vishy showed he is very well prepared this match

The Norwegian has to come up with something. Quick.

What would the World Championship be without true fans playing on a giant board?
Some pieces have been questionably placed, however.

Of course as you can see Black played an excellent game. And the truth is that everywhere there are trumpets and marching bands announcing that Carlsen saved himself, and that Anand missed a huge opportunity. How bad was Carlsen's position? Let's reanalyze Friedel's line:

[Event "FWCM 2013"]
[Site "Chennai"]
[Date "2013.11.12"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "A07"]
[WhiteElo "2870"]
[BlackElo "2775"]
[Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez, Alejandro"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "1r1r4/4qpk1/4b1p1/1pp1b1Np/7P/3PR1P1/1P3PB1/R5KQ b - - 0 29"]
[PlyCount "2"]
[EventDate "2013.??.??"]
[EventCountry "IND"]
[TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"]

29... Bd4 (29... Bxb2 {This is the move that everyone claims Anand 'missed'
like taking a free pawn was something that the World Champion didn't quite
consider. Anand is a famous player for his calculating skills, let us see what
he could possibly have seen:} 30. Rae1 Rb6 31. Bd5 {So far this is pretty
basic. White is piling pressure on the e6 bishop that is pinned and the next
few moves by Black are forced.} Bd4 $1 {The only way to fight for an advantage.
} 32. Rxe6 $1 {Also forced.} fxe6 33. Rxe6 $1 {Black has} Qf8 $1 {So suddenly
Black is up an exchange, but he has some tactical problems he must solve. For
starters pretty much all his pieces are hanging to a fork on e6. So lets say
White simply defends on f2:} 34. Qg2 {Now the task: find Black's next move.}
Rdd6 $1 {The computer move that keeps the advantage. We can follow the
computer line. Not an easy move to find though.} (34... Rdb8 35. Rxb6 Rxb6 36.
Ne6+ Rxe6 37. Bxe6 {is obviously going to end in a draw eventually.}) (34...
Rbb8 35. Rxg6+ $1 $11 (35. Re2 $11)) 35. Kh2 $1 {An obvious move when you
realize White needs his queen to do something meaningful in this game. The
threat is f4} (35. Re2 b4 36. Ne6+ Rxe6 37. Rxe6 Rxe6 38. Bxe6 Qe8 39. Bc4 Qe1+
40. Kh2 Bxf2 41. Qb7+ Kh6 42. Qf3 Qg1+ 43. Kh3 Qf1+ 44. Qg2 Qxg2+ 45. Kxg2 Be1
46. Ba2 Kg7 47. Kf3 Kf6 48. Kf4) 35... Rxe6 (35... b4 36. f4 $1 {And with Qe4
coming it seems that there is too much counterplay for black to hold on to his
material.}) 36. Nxe6+ Rxe6 37. Bxe6 Bxf2 38. Qb7+ Kh6 39. Qf7 Qxf7 40. Bxf7 {
and I think this is actually winning for Black.} Be1 41. Kg2 Kg7 42. Bd5 Kf6
43. Kf3 Ke5 44. Bf7) 30. Re2 {and eventually the game was drawn.} 1/2-1/2

My conclusion is that with perfect play Anand would have won the game after Bxb2. Still a complicated position, but Carlsen might consider himself lucky to have survived today's game. Onwards to the next round - where Carlsen still has to prove himself.

A gathering of people just to see the games on a TV at the hotel

Report by Alejandro Ramirez, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Report in Hindi by Niklesh Jain:

रोमांचक मुक़ाबले मे आनंद जीत के करीब पहुँच कर चूंके तीसरा मैच भी अनिर्णीत

आज वो सब कुछ  हुआ जिसका इंतजार इस विश्व चैंपियनशिप की शुरुआत से सभी दर्शक कर रहे थे । लाइट,कैमरा,एक्शन,ड्रामा,क्लाइमेक्स बस गीत संगीत को छोड़कर सब कुछ था एक बॉलीवुड मसाला फिल्म की तरह । दोनों खिलाड़ियो ने आज दर्शको की निराशा को दूर करते हुए कुल मिलाकर शानदार खेल का प्रदर्शन किया । दोनों खिलाड़ियो के पास अपने अपने कारण होंगे संतुष्ट ओर असंतुष्ट होने के । जंहा आनंद काले मोहरो से जीत के काफी करीब पहुंचे पर बाजी को जीत में नहीं बदल पाये । दूसरी और कार्लसन सफ़ेद मोहरो से जंहा हार के काफी करीब पहुँच कर भी वापसी करने मे सफल रहे । आज एक बार फिर कार्लसन से पहली चाल e4 ओर d4 उम्मीद कर रहे लोगो को उन्होने चौंकाते हुए पुनः Nf3 खेलते हुए इस बार रेटी ओपेनिंग से बाजी खेलने का चयन किया ।हालांकि शायद आनंद इसके लिए आज तैयार थे ओर पहले दो मुकाबलो की तुलना में  काफी सहजता से खेलते नजर आए । कार्लसन एक बार फिर मुख्य और थ्योर्टिकल लाइनों से हटकर खेलेते नजर आए । मजेदार बात यह भी थी की आनंद ने अपने लंबे शतरंज जीवन मे शायद बड़े स्तर पर रेटी ओपेनिंग मे  काले मोहरो से कोई खेल नहीं खेला है ओर शायद यही वजह थी की कार्लसन इसी बात  का फायदा लेना चाहते थे । आनंद ने d5 खेलते हुए कार्लसन का जबाब दिया । आनंद ने तीसरी ही चाल मे c4 के खिलाफ तुरंत dc4 खेलते हुए कार्लसन को जता दिया की वो आज पहले से और बेहतर तैयार है । छटी चाल मे जब आनंद ने अपनी e फाइल की पैदल को पांचवे घर मे भेजा । d4 खाने पर अपना नियंत्रण करते हुए अपनी तरफ से आज अच्छा खेल खेलने की उम्मीद जगाई जो आज सही भी साबित हुई ।कार्लसन की दसवी चाल Bd2 तक सब कुछ थ्योरी के हिसाब से चल रहा था ।पर आनंद ने 10वी चाल ..Nd4 नावेल्टी खेलते हुए कार्लसन को चौंका दिया कार्लसन ने बाद मे पत्रकारो से बात करते हुए भी यह माना की उन्होने भी इस चाल की उम्मीद नहीं की थी। कार्लसन ने बोर्ड के एकदम बीचों बीच पहुंचे घोड़े हटाने का निर्णय लिया परिणाम स्वरूप दोनों के एक के घोड़े अगली दो चालो मे खेल से बाहर हो गए । इसके साथ ही खेल पूरी तरह से एक दम मोड़ पर आ गया । 13वी चाल मे आनंद ने कार्लसन के वजीर पर आक्रमण करते हुए अपना सफ़ेद खानो वाला ऊंट बाहर निकालते हुए अपने सभी मोहरो को बाहर निकाल लिए ।  अगली ही चाल मे कार्लसन के शानदार सफ़ेद ऊंट की वजह से कमजोर नजर आ रही h1-a8 डाइगोनल पर अपना ऊंट d5 खाने पर रखते हुए अपनी ओर से बाजी को एकदम संतुलित कर दिया ।15वी चाल में कार्लसन ने a4 चलते हुए आनंद के थोड़े कमजोर नजर आ रहे क्वीन साइड पर आक्रमण की तैयारी शुरू कर दी । अगली चाल में उन्होने अपने ऊंट को आनंद के घोड़े से बदल दिया । अगली कुछ चालो मे कार्लसन ने a फ़ाइल की पैदल को आगे बढ़ाते हुए अपनी रणनीति को जारी रखा आगे की कुछ चाले  इस प्रकार रही -17.a5 Rab8 18.Re1 Rfc8 19.axb6 axb6 । अचानक 20वीं चाल में कार्लसन ने आनंद के राजा की तरफ f4 खाने में अपने वजीर को खेलते हुए बोर्ड के दोनों तरफ खेलेने की अपनी नयी रणनीति दिखलाई । पर अब आनंद की बारी थी उन्होने अपने अनुभव को दिखलाते हुए तुरंत कार्लसन की दोहरी रणनीति अपनाने का फायदा उठाते हुए अपनी पकड़ मजबूत करना शुरू कर दिया ।आनंद ने कार्लसन की काले खानो मे कमजोरी ओर मोहरो के बीच तालमेल की कमी का फायदा उठाते हुए दबाव बनाना शुरू कर दिया । परिणाम स्वरूप 25वीं चाल मे कार्लसन को अपना वजीर h1 खाने में ले जाना पड़ा । आनंद ने काफी तत्परता दिखाते हुए c5 चलते हुए आगे के खेल का भविष्य b,c,d की पैदलो पर तय कर दिया । दोनों खिलाड़ियो के पास अब अपनी 40 चाल पूरी करने का दवाब साफ  नजर आ रहा था । हालांकि आनंद जंहा शांत तो कार्लसन काफी परेशान दिखाई पड़ रहे थे । परिणाम स्वरूप कार्लसन ने 28वीं चाल मे इस विश्व चैंपियनशिप की पहली बड़ी गलत चाल चलते हुए अपनी b2 की पैदल कुर्बान करने का तय किया। अपने वजीर को खेल मे वापस लाने की उनकी हड़बड़ी साफ नजर आ रही थी । पर जबाब देते हुए आनंद 29 चाल मे खुद बेहतर चाल को न समझ पाने की भूल कर बैठे ओर उन्होने सभी को चौंकाते हुए b2 को ना मारने का फैसला लिया और Bd4 चल दिया । इसके बाद भी आनंद बेहतर स्थिति मे नजर आ रहे थे । अचानक उन पर भी 40 चालो को पूरा करने का दबाव साफ नजर आने लगा ओर उन्होने अपने अधिकतर मोहरो मुख्यतः हथियों को जल्द ही कार्लसन के हथियों से बदल कर खेल से बाहर कर दिया ओर खेल को खुद आसानी से ड्रॉ की तरफ मोड़ दिया । कार्लसन ने भी आनंद की इस भूल को भांपते हुए अपने घोड़े को आनंद के सफ़ेद खानो वाले ऊंट से बदलते हुए ओर d3 पैदल मारते हुए खेल को बराबर कर दिया । और फिर 38वीं चाल में  हथियों  के खेल से बाहर होते ही खेल पूरी तरह से ड्रॉ की ओर चल दिया । हालांकि अंत मे कार्लसन ने खेल को जारी रखने को फैसला लेते हुए शायद आनंद को यह जताने की कोशिश की वो आगे और बेहतर होकर वापस आएंगे ओर जीतने की पूरी कोशिश करेंगे । हालांकि दूसरे खेल के मुक़ाबले लगभग दुगनी चाले चलते हुए दोनों खिलाड़ी 51वीं चाल मे खेल ओर ड्रॉ की स्थिति बनाकर ही माने । मतलब आज का ड्रॉ ना तो आपसी सहमति से हुआ ना चालो को बार बार दोहरने से आज का यह अनिर्णीत मैच एक शानदार खेल का परिणाम रहा ।

भले ही आनंद यह मैच नहीं जीत पाये हो पर उन्होने आज एक बड़ी मनोवैज्ञानिक बढ़त कार्लसन के उपर बना दी है जिससे से उबरना अब उनके लिए आसान नहीं होगा। आनंद भी अगले मैच से सफ़ेद मोहरो से अपनी गल्तियो से अगर सबक लेते हैं तो परिणाम आने की बेहतर उम्मीद नजर आती है । अगले चक्र मे फिर एक शानदार खेल की उम्मीद के साथ.. आपका निकलेश जैन 

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
                 
1.5
2870
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
                 
1.5
2775

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 09
1
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 09
1
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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