Bilbao: Kramnik wins Chess Masters and eleven rating points

10/15/2010 – The 14th World Champion is in great form: after a good showing at the Olympiad he has now won the Shanghai-Bilbao Chess Masters, ahead of the 15th and reigning World Champion Viswanathan Anand. World number one Magnus Carlsen was third with a loss of nine rating points. We bring you our final round report with GM commentary by Romain Edouard.

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Bilbao Masters 2010

The 2010 Masters Final takes place from October 9th to October 15th in Bilbao, Spain. It is a six-round double round-robin event.

Time control: 90 minutes/40 moves + 60 minutes + 10 seconds/move as of move 41.

Game start: 4:30 PM local time (2:30 PM GMT - 10:30 AM New York / 7:30 AM Pacific daylight).

Rest day: Tuesday, October 12th.

Postscript to round five

After round five Magnus Carlsen wrote in his Arctic Securities blog: "I won today! Had nearly forgotten how good it feels. My opponent was Shirov and after the surprising home preparation Nb5 in the opening he went into a long think. The trapped knight “escaped” to a7 and continued to harass the black queenside forces. The computers may not give white much of an advantage, but after Nbd4 and b3 I certainly liked my position. In gradual time trouble he lost his way and we got another highly unusual material imbalance; queen, triple pawn and single pawn against a rook, a knight and a passed pawn. It required some work but was obviously winning for me. Kramnik-Anand was another somwhat uneventful draw, and they are now the only candidates to win the tournament with one round to go. I´m in third place and look forward to an exciting game as black against Anand tomorrow where both players obviously have enough for play for."

Round six report

Round 6: Friday, 15th October 2010

Viswanathan Anand 
½-½
 Magnus Carlsen
Alexei Shirov 
½-½
 Vladimir Kramnik

Shirov,Alexei (2749) - Kramnik,Vladimir (2780) [E25]
Grand Slam Final Masters 2010 Bilbao/Spain (6), 15.10.2010 [Romain Edouard]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.f3!? This line is getting more and more popular. 4...d5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 c5 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.dxc5








8...Qa5. 8...f5 occured in Anand-Kramnik, in their match in Bonn (2008), game two. 9.e4 Nf6 10.Be3 0-0 11.Qb3 Nfd7 12.a4 Qc7 13.Qa3 b6 14.a5 Bb7N








Nice novetly by Kramnik! 14...bxc5 was the usual move. 15.a6. One of the best tries according to Deep Rybka 4. 15...Bc8 16.Bb5 Nxc5 17.Bxc5 bxc5 18.Ne2 Bd7 19.Bc4. From now on Kramnik started to think some five minutes per move. I think the text move shouldn't be the only one to equalize, though Black must pay some attention due to White's space advantage. 19...Bc6!?








Giving the c-pawn for long-term compensations. This reminds, for instance, of some of the positions in the Bc4-Ne2 line in the Grunfeld. Black's safe development and pressure on the c-file is enough to compensate for an extra c-pawn. [19...Be8!?] 20.Qxc5 Nd7 21.Qa5 Rfc8 22.Qxc7. I think after this move, White has no winning chances at all. 22.0-0!? should be a better try, though Black should be able to draw by force, somehow. 22...Rxc7 23.Nd4 Bxe4. After this move, Kramnik started to play quickly until the draw was agreed. 24.Bxe6 fxe6 25.fxe4 Rxc3 26.0-0 Nc5 27.e5 h6








28.Rfc1 Rxc1+ 29.Rxc1 Nxa6 30.Nxe6 Re8 31.Nd4 Rxe5 32.Ra1 Re4 33.Rxa6 Rxd4 34.Rxa7 1/2-1/2. [Click to replay]


The face of a man who has just gained eleven rating points...


... and that of one who has lost five.


Anand,Viswanathan (2800) - Carlsen,Magnus (2826) [C95]
Grand Slam Final Masters 2010 Bilbao/Spain (6), 15.10.2010 [Romain Edouard]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0-0 9.h3 Nb8 10.d4 Nbd7 11.Nbd2 Bb7 12.Bc2 Re8 13.a4 Bf8 14.Bd3 c6 15.b4 Nb6 16.axb5 cxb5. Nice to see Magnus playing the same line again! 17.d5 Rc8 18.Ra3N. 18.Bb2 was Shirov's move in round three.








18...Nh5 19.Nf1 g6! 20.N1h2 Probably the first imprecise move. 20...Bg7 21.Bg5?! Qd7 22.Be3?!








Somehow, White's last 2-3 moves were just bad.22...Nc4?! Both 22...Nxd5 23.exd5 e4 and; 22...Na4 followed by ...f5 are given as nearly winning for Black by the engine! 23.Bxc4 Rxc4 24.Nd2 Rc7 25.Nhf1 Nf4. Also here, Black is doing very fine. 26.Bb6 Rcc8 27.Ne3 f5 28.f3 Rf8 29.Kh2








29...Rf7? 29...Nd3 30.Rf1 Bh6 would make White's task much harder, for instance: 31.Qb1 Nf4 32.c4!? Ne2! (32...bxc4?! 33.Nexc4 Ne2 34.Be3 is OK for White.) 33.c5 Bf4+ 34.Kh1 Ng3+ 35.Kg1 Nxf1 36.Ndxf1 and White keeps some chances. 30.c4! Now White escapes. I think or Carlsen underestimated his position and didn't believe he should try something too rough, or he overestimated and thought he has enough time to prepare his attack with moves like 29...Rh7. 30...bxc4 31.Nexc4 fxe4 32.fxe4 Rcf8 33.Be3 Bh6 34.Rf1 Bg7 35.Qa4 Qe7 36.b5 axb5 37.Qxb5 Bc8 38.Qb6 Qg5 39.Rf2 Qh4 40.Bxf4. The defensive 40.Nf3!? Qh5 41.Ng1 could be a much better try, as Black has huge problems with the d6-pawn, but just leads to a weird draw by force: 41...Qh4 (forced) 42.Nxd6 (42.g3 Nxd5 holds.) 42...Bxh3 (forced) 43.gxh3 Nxd5 (forced) 44.Qb3 Rxf2+ 45.Bxf2 Rxf2+ 46.Kh1 Qf4 (forced) 47.Qxd5+ Kh8 48.Ra8+ Bf8 49.Rxf8+ Qxf8 50.Qxe5+ Qg7 (forced) 51.Qe8+ Qg8 52.Qa4 Qa2 (forced) and draw. 40...Rxf4. 40...exf4!? holds thanks to the trick 41.Nxd6 Qg3+!!








42.Rxg3 fxg3+ 43.Kxg3 Be5+ 44.Kh4 Rxf2 45.Nxc8 Bf6+ 46.Kg3 Be5+ and draw! 41.Rxf4 Qxf4+ 42.Kg1 Bh6 43.Rf3 Qg5 44.Qc6 Rxf3 45.Nxf3 Qc1+ 46.Kf2 Bd7 47.Qxd7 Qxc4 48.Qe6+ Kg7 49.Qe7+ Kg8 50.Qe6+ Kg7 1/2-1/2. [Click to replay]


Analysing after the game


The World Champion in second place, with a small gain in rating points


Cheerful in spite of a bad start, which lost him nine rating points in Bilbao


The winner, Vladimir Kramnik, got a special trophy and a Basque cap


Alexei Shirov, Vladimir Kramnik, Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen


Everybody – players, arbiters, organisers – at the closing ceremony

All pictures by Nadja Wittmann + the organisation in Bilbao

Bilbao system scores

Player
games
wins
draws 
losses
points
Vladimir Kramnik
6
2
4
0
10
Viswanathan Anand
6
1
5
0
8
Magnus Carlsen
6
1
3
2
6
Alexei Shirov
6
0
4
2
4

Traditional cross table

All results

Round 1: Saturday, 9th October 2010

Vladimir Kramnik 
1-0
 Magnus Carlsen
Alexei Shirov 
½-½
 Viswanathan Anand

Round 2: Sunday, 10th October 2010

Magnus Carlsen 
0-1
 Viswanathan Anand
Vladimir Kramnik 
1-0
 Alexei Shirov

Round 3: Monday, 11th October 2010

Alexei Shirov 
½-½
 Magnus Carlsen
Viswanathan Anand 
½-½
 Vladimir Kramnik

Round 4: Wednesday, 13th October 2010

Magnus Carlsen 
½-½
 Vladimir Kramnik
Viswanathan Anand 
½-½
 Alexei Shirov

Round 5: Thursday, 14th October 2010

Magnus Carlsen 
1-0
 Alexei Shirov
Vladimir Kramnik 
½-½
 Viswanathan Anand

Round 6: Friday, 15th October 2010

Viswanathan Anand 
½-½
 Magnus Carlsen
Alexei Shirov 
½-½
 Vladimir Kramnik

Sponsors and organisers

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