Beijing Rd4: Three white wins

7/7/2013 – Alternating colours: yesterday in round three three players triumphed with the black pieces, with the remaining three games drawn. Today Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Wang Yue and Alexander Morozevich defeated Wang Hao, Gata Kamsky and Boris Gelfand – with the white pieces. Sergey Karjakin still leads alone with a 3000+ performance. Full report with GM analysis.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The fifth stage of the FIDE Grand Prix Series is taking place between the 3rd and 17th of July 2013 on the premises of the Chinese Chess Association in Beijing. The time controls are 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move from move 61 onwards. The games start at 3 p.m. local time, except the last round. The Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments to be held over two years (2012-2013). 18 top players participate in four of these six tournaments. The winner and second placed player overall of the Grand Prix Series will qualify for the Candidates Tournament to be held in March 2014.

Round 04 – July 07 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
1-0
Wang Hao 2752
Topalov Veselin 2767
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Wang Yue 2705
1-0
Kamsky Gata 2763
Giri Anish 2734
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Morozevich Alexander 2736
1-0
Gelfand Boris 2773

The first game to end was Sergey Karjakin vs Alexander Grischuk, which ended in a 31-move draw. It left Karjakin in the lead by half a point, ahead of Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, who outplayed Wang Hao in this round. Alexander Morozevich and Wang Yue won their first games in the tournament. The games Giri-Leko and Topalov-Ivanchuk were drawn.

Sergey Karjakin– Alexander Grischuk ½-½
Karjakin played a safe line and everything depended on whether his opponent would remember the exact moves. During the press conference Alexander Grischuk (above) recalled his previous games in the same variation against Peter Leko and Rustam Kasimdzanov: “It's a very interesting line, White has a lot of options. I’ve played it three times already, and every time White went for drawish continuation with me. When it's the third game in the same line in one year even I can remember the variations." The game finished in a draw.

Remembering the moves: Alexander Grischuk

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov – Wang Hao 1-0
Wang Hao tried to surprise Mamedyarov today and went for quite a sharp and principal line. After twelve moves Shakhriyar was out of his analysis and had to find moves at the board. According to Wang Hao, 19.Rc1 was a very strong move and it was clear for him something was missed during his preparation. White managed to get an advantage but had to play very precisely as Black had contra play on the queen’s side. The Chinese player came close to make a draw but blundered on 35th move.

Once again our express analysis comes from GM Alexander Ipatov from Turkey,
a bungy-jumping adventurer whom you can follow his blog at http://blog.alexipatov.com/.

[Event "FIDE GP Beijing 2013"] [Site "Beijing"] [Date "2013.07.07"] [Round "4"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Wang, Hao"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D10"] [WhiteElo "2753"] [BlackElo "2746"] [Annotator "A,Ipatov"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "CHN"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 dxc4 4. e3 b5 5. a4 b4 6. Ne4 Qd5 7. Ng3 ({Another alternative would be} 7. Nd2 {A fresh example from the end of June :} c3 8. bxc3 bxc3 9. Nb1 Qa5 10. Qc2 Na6 11. Qxc3 Nb4 12. Bd2 e6 13. Nf3 Nf6 14. Bc4 Be7 15. O-O O-O 16. Ne5 c5 17. dxc5 Qxc5 18. Bb5 Qxc3 19. Nxc3 Rd8 20. Rfd1 Bb7 $11 {Goganov,A (2562)-Jakovenko,D (2713) Yekaterinburg 2013}) 7... Nf6 8. Be2 e6 (8... Qxg2 $4 {Being too greedy is never good :} 9. Bf3 {and the queen is trapped.}) 9. e4 Nxe4 10. Bf3 f5 11. Qe2 ({Just one game on high level got to this position and White went for} 11. N1e2 Bd6 12. O-O Nd7 13. Nf4 Bxf4 14. Bxf4 O-O 15. Re1 Ndf6 16. Be5 Qd7 17. Bxe4 Nxe4 18. Nxe4 fxe4 19. Rxe4 Bb7 20. Qe2 {Sjugirov,S (2625)-Popov,I (2609) Tyumen 2012 and White achieved a better position thanks to his strong bishop and more active pieces.}) 11... c3 (11... Nxg3 12. hxg3 Qxd4 13. Bf4 Kf7 14. Bh5+ Kg8 15. Nf3 Qc5 16. O-O-O $1 {and White got a decisive attack in the game Svane,R (2394)-Geske,J (2401) Schwetzingen 2013}) 12. Nxe4 fxe4 13. Bxe4 Qb3 14. Bd3 Ba6 15. Bxa6 Nxa6 16. Qxa6 cxb2 17. Qxc6+ Kf7 18. Bxb2 Qxb2 19. Rc1 {Houdini evaluates this position as more favourable for White. We can say Black didn't come out well from the opening.} b3 20. Qb7+ {Otherwise, Bb4+ would come.} Be7 21. Qf3+ Kg6 (21... Bf6 $2 22. Rc7+ Kg6 23. Qd3+ Kh6 24. g4 $1 {and the threat Qh3-h5 is decisive.}) 22. Ne2 Rhf8 23. Qe4+ Kf7 24. O-O {White's king is in safety now, so White can concetrate on his attack.} Rac8 25. d5 {Opening up the position to get to Black's king!} (25. Rfe1 $5 Rxc1 26. Nxc1 {and Black can't hold his pawn-e6.}) 25... Qf6 26. Qxh7 $6 {Too greedy. Now Black gets time to organize his own counterplay.} Rxc1 27. Nxc1 Rb8 28. Nd3 b2 29. Rb1 Rb3 ({According to the computer} 29... exd5 {was better} 30. Qh5+ Kg8 31. Qxd5+ Kh8 {and White doesn't have anything more than repeatition. Playing for win wouldn't change the outcome.} 32. h3 Qc3 $1 {Activating the queen} 33. Rxb2 Rxb2 34. Nxb2 Qxb2 35. Qa8+ Kh7 36. Qe4+ Kg8 37. Qxe7 Qc1+ 38. Kh2 Qf4+ 39. Kg1 Qc1+) 30. g3 Bd6 $2 (30... exd5 31. Qh5+ Kg8 32. Qxd5+ Qf7 {and Black has good counter chances thanks to his advanced b-pawn.}) 31. dxe6+ Ke7 32. Qe4 Qc3 33. Qf5 Qf6 34. Qd5 Qc3 35. Qh5 Kd8 $4 ({After} 35... Kxe6!! {White would have had to force a draw.}) 36. Nxb2 $1 Rxb2 37. Rd1 {Conclusion: White got the opening advantage and throughout the game was pressing and posing problems to his opponent. Black had chances to escape but the Chinese GM collapsed before the time control.} 1-0

Alexander Morozevich – Boris Gelfand 1-0
The players repeated the same variation from the game Gelfand-Topalov until the tenth move but this time Gelfand was playing with reversed colors. According to Alexander Morozevich (above), he didn’t expect the variation with 7…Na6 and was not ready to test the main lines after 10.0-0. White didn’t achieve anything special in the side-line 10. Bg5, and after the opening the position was approximately equal. Gelfand could have defended against the sacrifice on f7 by playing 20…Rd7, but 20…Nc6 seemed also good enough for him. 21…Rf8 was just a blunder. Black could have taken on f7 and all the fight would be ahead after 22.d7 Rf8 23. Ng5 Kg8.

Wang Yue - Gata Kamsky 1-0
Wang Yue (above) gained the first victory in the tournament after a seven-hour battle against Gata Kamsky. In the middlegame the American player decided to sacrifice a pawn, but could not prove he had enough counterlay. Wang Yue played very creatively and gave an exchange in order to get a very strong passed pawn on e6. Later on Gata Kamsky gave back an exchange and had to defend a worse rook endgame. 47. Rc7 was the original idea of Chinese player, but for some reason he played Kh5 and gave his opponent good chances for a draw.

Veselin Topalov - Vassily Ivanchuk ½-½
Ivanchuk managed to surprise his opponent with his third move, 3...Qb6. Topalov was not happy with the position he got. "I had to play actively, maybe even make long castling, because after 18 moves I've got an unpleasant position." Nevertheless, the Bulgarian tried to play for initiative and was keeping the balance. Both players missed an interesting option for Black, 37…Kg7. After this move it is unclear if White has enough recourses to hold a draw. After 37…h6 Veselin forced a draw with perpetual check.

Anish Giri - Peter Leko ½-½
This game ended in a repetition after 25 moves. Neither side had moved away from the draw margin.

Information and pictures by FIDE press chief WGM Anastasiya Karlovich

Replay the games of this round

Click on the dropdown menu above the board to change games.

Current standings

Schedule and pairings

The games start at 9:00h European time, 11:00h Moscow, 3 a.m. New York.
You can find your regional starting time here.

Round 01 – July 04 2013, 15:00h
Giri Anish 2734
0-1
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Morozevich Alexander 2736
½-½
Wang Yue 2705
Gelfand Boris 2773
0-1
Topalov Veselin 2767
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Kamsky Gata 2763
0-1
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
½-½
Wang Hao 2752
Round 02 – July 05 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
1-0
Wang Hao 2752
Grischuk Alexander 2780
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
½-½
Kamsky Gata 2763
Topalov Veselin 2767
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Yue 2705
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2773
Giri Anish 2734
½-½
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Round 03 – July 06 2013, 15:00h
Morozevich Alexander 2736
0-1
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Gelfand Boris 2773
0-1
Giri Anish 2734
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Wang Yue 2705
Kamsky Gata 2763
½-½
Topalov Veselin 2767
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
0-1
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Wang Hao 2752
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Round 04 – July 07 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
1-0
Wang Hao 2752
Topalov Veselin 2767
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Wang Yue 2705
1-0
Kamsky Gata 2763
Giri Anish 2734
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Morozevich Alexander 2736
1-0
Gelfand Boris 2773
Round 05 – July 09 2013, 15:00h
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Leko Peter 2737
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Giri Anish 2734
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Wang Yue 2705
Wang Hao 2752
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Round 06 – July 10 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Wang Yue 2705
-
Wang Hao 2752
Giri Anish 2734
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Leko Peter 2737
Round 07 – July 11 2013, 15:00h
Leko Peter 2737
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Wang Hao 2752
-
Giri Anish 2734
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Wang Yue 2705
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Round 08 – July 12 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Wang Yue 2705
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Giri Anish 2734
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Wang Hao 2752
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Leko Peter 2737
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Round 09 – July 14 2013, 15:00h
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Hao 2752
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Giri Anish 2734
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Wang Yue 2705
Round 10 – July 15 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Wang Yue 2705
Giri Anish 2734
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Leko Peter 2737
-
Wang Hao 2752
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Round 11 – July 16 2013, 15:00h
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Wang Hao 2752
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Leko Peter 2737
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Wang Yue 2705
-
Giri Anish 2734

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register