2012 Chess Olympiad Istanbul: Round six

9/4/2012 – This round was a showcase of classic monster matches, says the official bulletin. "When Godzilla and King Kong fight you don't get in the way. You step back and watch the destruction, hoping you don't become collateral damage." The match of the day was Russia vs Armenia, the game of the day Kramnik vs Aronian. In the women's section it was China vs Russia. Report and videos.

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The 40th Chess Olympiad is taking place in the Turkish metropole of Istanbul, from August 27 to September 10th, 2012. A record of 158 national chess federations have brought teams to Istanbul to participate in this prestigious event, which is being staged in the WOW Hotel and Convention Center, just minutes away from the airport.

Round six

In the Open section, top seeds Russia and Armenia met with monster mayhem on boards 1 and 2.

Kramnik (above right), with the white pieces, searched for some small opportunity to squeeze his Armenian opponent, and his opportunity came about...

...when Aronian pressed too hard, handing Kramnik the victory. On the board next to them the classic Sasha Grischuk threw himself into an insanely complicated position and lost. The bottom two boards drew their games and the match was tied 2-2.

China delivered blow after massive blow, taking their opponents of Bosnia down with a score of 3.5-0.5. Hungary and Azerbajian dispatched of their opponents, Poland and Croatia, respectively, with score of 3-1. Finally, the USA and German teams held each other to a draw with even scores on all boards. No boards seemed to ever be in any danger of losing their games. The French team beat Finland 2.5-1.5 – Andrew Martin has annotated one of the games in his video report below.

A three-way tie exists for first place with Russia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan respectively. These results leaves the medal hunt still wide open, with five rounds left to go.

Round six: Top twenty team pairings – Open

No.
SNo
Team
Res.
Res.
Team
SNo
1
1
Russia
2
2
Armenia
3
2
7
Azerbaijan
3
1
Croatia
19
3
14
Germany
2
2
USA
5
4
17
Czech Rep.
Spain
18
5
35
Philippines
Bulgaria
10
6
50
Bosnia Herz.
½
China
6
7
4
Hungary
3
1
Poland
16
8
11
England
2
2
Italy
22
9
44
Montenegro
1
3
Ukraine
2
10
13
India
2
2
Israel
12
11
23
Moldova
½
Slovenia
28
12
27
Vietnam
2
2
Egypt
37
13
47
Colombia
½
Georgia
26
14
8
France
Finland
52
15
31
Turkey
Tajikistan
60
16
33
Uzbekistan
½
Brazil
24
17
38
Mexico
Canada
53
18
29
Argentina
3
1
Slovakia
42
19
49
FYROM
Australia
61
20
15
Cuba
½
Qatar
66

In the Women's section, favorites Russia and China squared off. They exchanged losses on boards 1 and 2 respectively and drew on boards 3 and 4 – a near identical repeat of what happened in the Open section. Board 4 was first to complete with a bloodless bishop of opposite color draw, but it soon was to get bloody when WWCC Yifan Hou delivered the death blow to T. Kosintseva. The elder Kosintseva avenged her younger sisters loss by dispatching of her opponent to even up the match score. Board 3 soon drew afterward securing a drawn match.

Russia's lead is now gone, as the ladies of Poland caught up with a massive win. Led by GM Socko, the Poles took out Serbia with a score of 3.5-0.5. Georgia, Ukraine, France and Vietnam have all moved ahead with neat victories in the 6th round. Spain and Hungary exchanged a pair of wins and drew two games to finish the match in a 2-2 tie.

Round six: Top twenty team pairings – Women

No.
SNo
Team
Res.
Res.
Team
SNo
1
1
China
2
2
Russia
2
2
7
Poland
½
Serbia
19
3
20
Slovakia
Georgia
3
4
12
Hungary
2
2
Spain
11
5
4
Ukraine
½
Azerbaijan
27
6
14
France
3
1
Philippines
57
7
23
Czech Rep.
1
3
Vietnam
28
8
42
Montenegro
2
2
Estonia
49
9
18
Greece
Belarus
36
10
37
Peru
3
1
Latvia
24
11
22
Kazakhstan
2
2
Netherlands
17
12
6
India
3
1
Germany
9
13
25
Israel
Uzbekistan
35
14
13
Bulgaria
2
2
Slovenia
16
15
59
Canada
½
USA
5
16
43
Austria
1
3
Turkey
45
17
8
Armenia
½
Argentina
29
18
10
Romania
½
El Salvador
66
19
51
Denmark
0
4
Italy
31
20
26
Iran
½
Moldova
41

Top rankings after six rounds

# Open
+
=
Pts
1 Russia
5
1
0
11
2 Armenia
5
1
0
11
3 Azerbaijan
5
1
0
11
4 China
5
0
1
10
5 Philippines
5
0
1
10
6 Ukraine
5
0
1
10
7 Hungary
5
0
1
10
8 Spain
5
0
1
10
9 Germany
3
3
0
9
10 Moldova
4
1
1
9
11 India
3
3
0
9
12 USA
3
3
0
9
13 France
4
1
1
9
14 England
3
3
0
9
15 Mexico
4
1
1
9
16 Croatia
4
1
1
9
17 Argentina
4
1
1
9
18 Georgia
4
1
1
9
19 Turkey
4
1
1
9
20 Uzbekistan
4
1
1
9
 
# Women
+
=
Pts
1 Russia
5
1
0
11
2 Poland
5
1
0
11
3 China
4
2
0
10
4 Ukraine
4
2
0
10
5 Georgia
4
2
0
10
6 France
5
0
1
10
7 Vietnam
5
0
1
10
8 Hungary
4
1
1
9
9 Greece
4
1
1
9
10 Serbia
4
1
1
9
11 Spain
4
1
1
9
12 Slovakia
4
1
1
9
13 India
4
1
1
9
14 Estonia
4
1
1
9
15 Uzbekistan
4
1
1
9
16 Montenegro
4
1
1
9
17 Peru
4
1
1
9
18 USA
3
2
1
8
19 Kazakhstan
3
2
1
8
20 Bulgaria
3
2
1
8

Press conference with GM Vladimir Kramnik


Kramnik in the press conference with GM Robert Fontaine and WGM Anastasiya Karlovich

My game against Levon Aronian was really surprising. It went for me quite smoothly. Levon is absolutely a great player in fantastic shape. Of course playing white my task was to try to press him and win. But somehow it went easier for me. Levon had an uncomfortable position out of the opening. Then he missed tactics with Nxb7 or maybe he missed Qb6. I don’t know exactly. But after that it was over and I just had to calculate the variations accurately. To my surprise I manage to do it. Not like in my last two games which were disappointing, especially my game against Wang Hao, such a simple victory which I missed. This time at least I managed to rehabilitate myself and win hopefully a very important game of this match.

Fontaine: When you sacrificed a piece, did you already understand that the position is winning?

Well I thought so, but from another point of view, when you play against such a strong player, you always have doubts maybe he has some ace up his sleeve. When I sacrificed I already saw the situation with Qb6, and all this line with Rb7, Rc6, Rb8, Qb8. I did not really consider Qa8. I thought that after Qa8 I can even play only Kh1 and then B5. But then I calculated b5, the line that I played in the game was not difficult, it was quite simple. I had a feeling that after Ka5 Black’s position is already difficult. I think Rc7 is a mistake. He should have done something else, but Black’s position is already uncomfortable, especially with a pawn on f6. If a pawn would be on f7, something could be done maybe. But f6 pawn is not a fun at all. Then everything worked out tactically.

When you play on the first board, you have only strong opponents who normally participate in the top tournaments. It is like you play in Tal Memorial. The difference is that in Tal Memorial you know against who you are going to play. Here you don’t know and the time control is a bit unusual for me as well. The last time I played this time control was the Olympiad in Khanty Mansiysk. And of course it is not a secret that our goal is to try to win the Olympiad. You understand that it is a lot of pressure and responsibility.

Fontaine: You have now a new coach Yuri Dohoyan. How is it to work with him and did anything change in the team with him?

Yuri is just the best coach, maybe the best coach in the world in my opinion. No matter of which team, women’s or men’s. Yuri is really a great coach. He also led Russian women’s team to a success. We are very happy that we have him.


Look who's visiting the Olympiad! Garry Kasparov with his former second Yuri Dohoyan.

Summaries from the official web site,
photos by David Llada, Arman Karakhanyan, Anastasiya Karlovich


Daniel King: Round 5 Play of the Day: Vladimir Kramnik vs Levon Aronian

Andrew Martin: Game of the Day Rd 6: IM Mikael Agopov vs GM Romain Edouard

Full video report of round six

Live video coverage of the Olympiad


Remaining schedule of the Olympiad

There is live commentary of the most interesting games on Playchess.com,
beginning around half an hour after the games have started.

2 September 2012   Free Day
3 September 2012 15.00 6th Round
Daniel King
4 September 2012 15.00 7th Round
Reeh/Müller
5 September 2012 15.00 8th Round
Daniel King
6 September 2012 15.00 9th Round
Valery Lilov
7 September 2012 15.00 10th Round
Daniel King
8 September 2012   Free Day
9 September 2011 11.00 11th Round, Closing
Daniel King
10 September 2011 Departure

Some hours after the end of each round we will be posting video summaries by Daniel King on our news page. If possible they will appear on the same night, otherwise early the next morning. We also expect best-game video commentary from Andrew Martin.


Links

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