World Junior R08+09: Chinese and Russians top

by Sagar Shah
10/16/2014 – After nine rounds two powerhouses of world chess are in the forefront. In the Open section the two Chinese GMs Wei Yi and Lu Shanglei remain in the lead with 7.0/9, but are joined by a Russian: Vladimir Fedoseev. In the Girls section last year's winner Aleksandra Goryachkina of Russia is in the sole lead with 7.5/9. Big pictorial report by Sagar Shah.

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Rounds eight and nine: Chinese and Russians at the top

By Sagar Shah

After nine rounds of World Junior Championships 2014, two powerhouses of world chess are in the forefront. In the Open section the two Chinese GMs Wei Yi (2641) and Lu Shanglei (2533) met each other in the ninth round and drew their game to remain in the lead with 7.0/9. They were joined by a Russian who is the top seed in the event: Vladimir Fedoseev (2661). In the Girls section it was last year's winner and the top seed of the event, the Russian Aleksandra Goryachkina (2430), who is in the sole lead with 7.5/9.

The two Chinese players Wei Yi and Lu Shanglei kick off the ninth round on the top board

The battle between Wei Yi and Lu Shanglei lived up to its expectation. The Chinese players went for full-blooded fight, and Lu Shanglei, who had the black pieces, was able to get the advantage. He played excellently, and just when things seemed to be looking bleak for Wei Yi, Black made a mistake which gave him a chance to fight back. Wei Yi played accurately and managed to hold a draw. A very interesting fight.

[Event "WCh U20"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.15"] [Round "9"] [White "Wei, Yi"] [Black "Lu, Shanglei"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B80"] [WhiteElo "2641"] [BlackElo "2533"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "119"] [EventDate "2014.10.06"] [EventRounds "13"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. g3 e6 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O Qc7 9. Be3 Nc6 10. a4 O-O 11. f4 Nxd4 12. Qxd4 Ng4 13. Qb6 Qc4 14. Bd4 e5 15. Bf2 exf4 16. Nd5 Bd8 17. Qxd6 Nxf2 18. Rxf2 fxg3 19. hxg3 Be6 20. a5 Rc8 21. e5 Qb5 22. Raf1 Rc6 23. Ne7+ Bxe7 24. Qxe7 Rcc8 25. Qxb7 Qxe5 26. b3 Qxa5 27. c4 Rb8 28. Qe4 Qc5 29. Qd3 Rfd8 30. Qc3 Qb6 31. Rb1 Qb4 32. Qxb4 Rxb4 33. c5 Rd3 34. Rc2 Rbxb3 35. Rbc1 Rxg3 36. c6 g6 37. c7 Kg7 $2 (37... Bc8 $1 {would make White's task of winning the black bishop much more difficult} 38. Rd1 Rbd3 { Very important to move this rook to d3, so that the other rook on g3 keeps the bishop pinned to the king.} 39. Rcd2 (39. Rxd3 Rxd3 40. Rb2 Rc3 $19) 39... Rxd2 40. Rxd2 Kg7 41. Rd8 Bb7 42. Rd2 (42. c8=Q Rxg2+ 43. Kf1 Bxc8 44. Kxg2 Be6 $19 {is a winning endgame.}) 42... Bxg2 $1 43. c8=Q Bb7+ 44. Kh2 Bxc8 45. Kxg3 Be6 $19 {White cannot hold this position.}) 38. c8=Q Bxc8 39. Rxc8 {Even though Black is better here, his task of winning the game is quite difficult.} Rb2 40. R8c2 Rxc2 41. Rxc2 a5 42. Rc5 a4 43. Kf2 Rg4 44. Ra5 Rf4+ 45. Ke3 Rg4 46. Bf3 Rh4 47. Ra7 g5 48. Bd5 Rf4 49. Be4 h5 50. Rxa4 Rf6 51. Ra5 Kh6 52. Ra8 g4 53. Rg8 Rf1 54. Ke2 Rf4 55. Ke3 Rf6 56. Bd5 Kh7 57. Rg5 Kh6 58. Rg8 Kh7 59. Rg5 Kh6 60. Rg8 1/2-1/2

The pictures say it all: they came as friends, fought like mortal enemies and went back
as friends. Vladimir Fedoseev vs Karen Grigoryan (1-0)

That moment when S.L. Narayanan made an important norm. He drew his ninth round game
with Vidit Gujrathi and, with a performance of 2608, he made his maiden GM norm.

The 16-year-old Narayanan is not a very expressive boy. The smile in the above picture definitely shows that he is happy with his performance. With 6.0/9 and four more rounds to go, he can make this tournament even more memorable by aiming for one of the medals.

IM Diptayan Ghosh (2508) needed a win against GM Cori Jorge (2612) to make his second GM norm. He was on his back foot for the entire game, defended resourcefully and was able to liquidate into a pawn down rook endgame that was completely drawn. For nearly 20 moves the players kept pottering around, giving checks. But then came the unbelievable moment! On 72nd move Jorge blundered! This gave Diptayan the chance to simply make a queen and register a win! But it was not to be. Out of inertia, Diptayan chose the safest way to draw the game and missed his chance. The young lad from Kolkata must be heartbroken, but he has another shot at the norm in the 10th round if he manages to beat Kamil Dragun (2546) with the white pieces.

[Event "WCh U20"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.15"] [Round "9"] [White "Cori, Jorge"] [Black "Ghosh, Diptayan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D90"] [WhiteElo "2612"] [BlackElo "2508"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "152"] [EventDate "2014.10.06"] [EventRounds "13"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Bg7 7. e4 Bg4 8. Bb5+ c6 9. Ng5 O-O 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Nxe2 Na6 12. Qh3 h6 13. Nf3 Qd7 14. Qh4 h5 15. O-O c5 16. e5 Nd5 17. h3 Qb5 18. Nc3 Qc6 19. Nxd5 Qxd5 20. Be3 cxd4 21. Bxd4 Nb4 22. Rfd1 Nc6 23. Bc3 Qe6 24. Re1 Qf5 25. Re4 Rad8 26. Rae1 Bh6 27. e6 f6 28. Nd4 Nxd4 29. Rxd4 Bg5 30. Qe4 Qxe4 31. Rexe4 f5 32. Rxd8 Rxd8 33. Rc4 Bd2 34. Be5 Ba5 35. Kh2 g5 36. h4 g4 37. Bf4 Bb6 38. Kg3 Kg7 39. Bc7 Rd3+ 40. f3 Kf6 41. Bxb6 axb6 42. Rb4 Rd6 43. Kf4 Rc6 44. b3 Rc2 45. Rb5 Rxg2 46. Rxf5+ Kxe6 47. Rxh5 gxf3 48. Rh6+ Kd5 49. Kxf3 Rxa2 50. Rxb6 e5 51. Rxb7 Rh2 52. Kg3 Rh1 53. b4 e4 54. b5 e3 55. Re7 Kd4 56. b6 Rb1 57. b7 Kd3 58. Kf3 Rf1+ 59. Kg2 Rb1 60. Kf3 Rf1+ 61. Kg4 Rg1+ 62. Kf4 Rf1+ {At this point Soumya Swaminathan and I were doing commentary on the game, and we exclaimed that continuing play is futile. It is a dead draw. The computers also agreed with our assessment, and we decided to go to some other game. After all the games were over, we noticed the result and it was a draw. We didn't even bother to take another look at the game. Later, one of my friend, Rakesh Kulkarni, pointed out what we had missed! After ten moves, on the 72nd move, Black missed his golden chance.} 63. Kg4 Rg1+ 64. Kf4 (64. Kf5 Rb1 $11 {is the right way to defend.} ( 64... Rg8 $2 65. Ke6 e2 66. Kd6 Kd2 67. Kc7 $18 {is an easy way to lose the game.})) 64... Rf1+ 65. Ke5 Rb1 (65... Rf8) 66. Kd6 e2 67. Kc7 Rc1+ 68. Kd8 Rb1 69. Kc8 Rc1+ 70. Kd8 Rb1 71. Kc8 Rc1+ {[#]Everything is fine until now. A draw should have been agreed with Kd8. But now Cori makes a mistake that is simply inexplicable.} 72. Rc7 $4 {A huge blunder} Rxc7+ $4 (72... e1=Q $1 $19 {just finishes the game with a black victory, as Rakesh Kulkarni pointed out.}) 73. Kxc7 e1=Q 74. b8=Q Qe5+ 75. Kc8 Qxb8+ 76. Kxb8 Ke4 {All is back to normal now and the point is split!} 1/2-1/2

 

Thinking a little bit deeply about the above blunder by both the sides, it seems to me that the players have started to run out of steam. Don't believe me?

A sleepy Lu Shanglei on the top board! And he is not the only one in the playing hall....

As the round number increases, so do the number of yawns we are seeing!

As a final proof of how the players are blundering, have a look at the game given below.

[Event "WCh U20"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.15"] [Round "9"] [White "Tari, Aryan"] [Black "Bersamina, Paulo"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B36"] [WhiteElo "2450"] [BlackElo "2380"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "314"] [EventDate "2014.10.06"] [EventRounds "13"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nf6 6. Nc3 d6 7. Be2 Nxd4 8. Qxd4 Bg7 9. Be3 O-O 10. Qd2 a5 11. Rc1 a4 12. f3 Be6 13. Nd5 Nd7 14. Qb4 Nc5 15. O-O Bxd5 16. cxd5 Qa5 17. Qxa5 Rxa5 18. Rc2 b6 19. Rb1 Ra7 20. Rc4 Rb8 21. Rb4 Ra5 22. Rc1 b5 23. Bxc5 Bh6 24. Bxd6 exd6 25. Rc6 Bd2 26. a3 Kf8 27. e5 Bxb4 28. axb4 Ra7 29. exd6 Rd7 30. Kf2 Rbd8 31. Bxb5 Rb7 32. Rc5 Rxd6 33. Ke3 Rb8 34. Kd4 Rdb6 35. Kc4 h6 36. f4 Kg7 37. g3 g5 38. fxg5 hxg5 39. d6 Rxd6 40. Rxg5+ Kf6 41. h4 Rc8+ 42. Rc5 Rg8 43. Rg5 Rc8+ 44. Rc5 Rg8 45. Rg5 Rxg5 46. hxg5+ Kxg5 47. Bxa4 Kf6 48. g4 Ke7 49. Bc2 Rd2 50. Kc3 Rf2 51. Bf5 Kd6 52. Bc8 Rf4 53. Kb3 Kc6 54. Kc3 Kc7 55. Bf5 Kd6 56. Bc8 Rf3+ 57. Kc4 Kc6 58. Bf5 Rf4+ 59. Kb3 Rd4 60. Kc3 Rd1 61. Be4+ Kb6 62. Bf5 Rc1+ 63. Kb3 Kc6 64. Be4+ Kd6 65. Bf5 Rc7 66. Ka4 Ra7+ 67. Kb3 Kd5 68. Bc8 Re7 69. Bf5 Re3+ 70. Ka4 Kc6 71. Bc8 Kc7 72. Bf5 Kb6 73. Bc8 Rd3 74. Bf5 Rd4 75. Bc8 Rd2 76. Kb3 Kb5 77. Kc3 Rd1 78. Bf5 Rc1+ 79. Kb3 Kc6 80. Be4+ Kd6 81. Bf5 Kd5 82. Bd7 Rg1 83. Bc8 Rg3+ 84. Ka4 Kc6 85. Bf5 Kb6 86. Bd7 Rd3 87. Bf5 Rd4 88. Bc8 Rd8 89. Bf5 Rb8 90. Bd7 Kc7 91. Bf5 Kd6 92. Kb3 Kd5 93. Bd7 Rb6 94. Bc8 Kd4 95. Bf5 Ke5 96. Bd7 Kd6 97. Bc8 f6 98. Bf5 Kc7 99. Kc4 Rc6+ 100. Kd5 Rd6+ 101. Kc5 Rd2 102. b3 Re2 103. Kc4 Kc6 104. Kd4 Re5 105. Kc4 Re3 106. Bc8 Re4+ 107. Kc3 Rf4 108. Be6 Kd6 109. Bc8 Rf1 110. Kd3 Kc6 111. Kc3 Rc1+ 112. Kb2 Rd1 113. Kc2 Rd8 114. Be6 Rd6 115. Bf5 Kb5 116. Kc3 Rc6+ 117. Kd4 Kxb4 118. Kd5 Rb6 119. Be6 Kc3 120. Bf7 Rb4 121. Ke6 Rf4 122. Bg6 Rxg4 123. Kxf6 Kxb3 124. Kg7 Kc4 125. Kh7 Kd5 126. Bf7+ Ke5 127. Kh8 Rh4+ 128. Kg7 Kf5 129. Bg6+ Ke6 130. Bh7 Rg4+ 131. Kh8 Kf7 132. Bc2 Rg8+ 133. Kh7 Rc8 134. Bb3+ Kf8 135. Bg8 Rc7+ 136. Kh8 Rc8 137. Kh7 Rc2 138. Kh8 Rg2 139. Bh7 Kf7 140. Bd3 Rg4 141. Bh7 Rg1 142. Bd3 Kf6 143. Bc2 Rg3 144. Bh7 Rh3 145. Kg8 Re3 146. Kh8 Kf7 147. Bg8+ Kg6 148. Bh7+ Kh6 149. Bg8 Re7 150. Ba2 Rh7+ 151. Kg8 Ra7 152. Bd5 Rd7 153. Be6 Re7 154. Bf7 Rb7 {It is obvious that Black cannot win this position. Aryan has been defending pretty well here. But now exhaustion tells and he makes the worst move in the position.} 155. Be6 $4 { There were five moves to draw here but Aryan chooses the sixth and its all over!} (155. Bc4 $11) (155. Bd5 $11) (155. Ba2 Kg6 156. Kf8 $11) (155. Kf8 $11) (155. Be8 $11) 155... Kg6 156. Kh8 (156. Kf8 Kf6 $19) 156... Rh7+ 157. Kg8 Re7 {What a heartbreaking loss!} 0-1

Though it was a lucky break for Paulo Bersamina (above) of Philippines, his attitude of playing on in the theoretically drawn position for nearly 35 moves must be commended! He also achieved an IM norm for this effort.

Irakli Beradze (2318) from Georgia had to win in the ninth round to make
his IM norm, and he did it in style by beating IM Toms Kantans (2485)

IM Bai Jinshi (2406) has played splendidly in this tournament –
with 6.5/9 and a performance of 2624 has achieved his GM-norm

IM Aravindh Chithambaram (2485) continues to impress
everyone with his unconventional play and is now on 6.5/9

Aleksandra Goryachkina scored three wins on a trot and in now
the sole leader in the Girls section with 7.5/9

The tenth round will witness a key battle in the girls section as Goryachkina will take on Sarasadat Khademalsharieh who is on 7.0/9. Sarasadat is the only player who can stop Goryachkina now, as she is the only one on seven points. If Goryachkina manages to win this key encounter, her path to the gold should be relatively easy.

Sarasadat Khademalsharieh has a huge responsibility on her shoulders!

When so many young players play in the tournament, there is bound to be some nice style statements.

P.V. Nandhidhaa (2174) made her third WIM norm and also
gained 62 Elo points. That means now she will soon be a WIM.

Pratyusha Bodda (2078) also made her WIM norm

Anna Iwanow (2279) carries with her a nice bag which shows ...

... an intersting way to manage your life.

WFM Rucha Pujari (2113) in a chessboard top

IM Idani Pouya (2517) Ray-Bans during the game

A chess champion in the making! Sandeep Gohad, who is the webmaster of the World
Junior website, watches his two-year-old son Yash take his first steps in the game

The men who are responsible for the live transmission of the games: IA N.K. Nandakumar,
IA V. Vijayaraghavan, IA Ganesh Babu and FA V.L. Anandh Babu

Continuing my task of finding inspiring stories at the World Junior, I present to you Claudia Munoz. She is from USA and is rated 1906. Her score is 3.5/9. After winning the United States girls Junior Championship she qualified for the World Junior. But then she faced a huge problem. She didn't have the finances to travel to Pune. Find out, how she managed to solve this problem in the video below.

Video reports of rounds eight and nine by Vijay Kumar

All pictures by Amruta Mokal

Results and standings

Before we could publish this report the tenth round of the World Junior Championship had been completed. In the following we bring you the results of the top pairings and the tournament standings after ten rounds. Our next report will come after round twelve.

Top results of Round ten

Ti. Name FED Rtg
Res.
Ti. Name FED Rtg
GM Lu Shanglei CHN 2533
1-0
GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2661
GM Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2524
0-1
GM Wei Yi CHN 2641
IM Aravindh Chithambaram IND 2485
½-½
GM Cori Jorge PER 2612
GM Grigoryan Karen H. ARM 2591
½-½
IM Bai Jinshi CHN 2406
IM Ghosh Diptayan IND 2508
½-½
GM Dragun Kamil POL 2546
GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2599
1-0
FM Bersamina Paulo PHI 2380
GM Indjic Aleksandar SRB 2554
1-0
IM Das Sayantan IND 2445
IM Kriebel Tadeas CZE 2428
0-1
GM Oparin Grigoriy RUS 2552
IM Sunilduth Lyna Narayanan IND 2420
0-1
GM Ankit R. Rajpara IND 2508
  Repka Christopher SVK 2418
½-½
IM Karthikeyan Murali IND 2499
IM Ducarmon Quinten NED 2487
½-½
IM Ider Borya FRA 2394
IM Prasanna Raghuram Rao IND 2447
0-1
  Beradze Irakli GEO 2318
GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2635
1-0
FM Johansson Linus SWE 2401
  Visakh Nr IND 2282
½-½
GM Bok Benjamin NED 2591
FM Csonka Balazs HUN 2409
1-0
IM Idani Pouya IRI 2517
GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE 2496
1-0
  Navalgund Niranjan IND 2267
FM Nasanjargal Urtnasan MGL 2330
0-1
IM Tari Aryan NOR 2450
IM Narayanan Srinath IND 2443
½-½
IM Codenotti Marco ITA 2357
GM Van Kampen Robin NED 2641
½-½
  Kumaran B IND 2279
FM Koksal Ege TUR 2321
0-1
GM Kovalev Vladislav BLR 2548
Rk. SNo Ti. Name FED RtgI Pts.
rtg+/-
1 3 GM Wei Yi CHN 2641 8.0
8.8
2 13 GM Lu Shanglei CHN 2533 8.0
27.4
3 8 GM Grigoryan Karen H. ARM 2591 7.0
3.1
4 5 GM Cori Jorge PER 2612 7.0
4.6
5 18 IM Ghosh Diptayan IND 2508 7.0
8.7
6 1 GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2661 7.0
-6.0
7 6 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2599 7.0
-7.4
8 37 IM Bai Jinshi CHN 2406 7.0
29.4
9 10 GM Oparin Grigoriy RUS 2552 7.0
-0.6
10 12 GM Dragun Kamil POL 2546 7.0
-4.9
11 17 GM Ankit R. Rajpara IND 2508 7.0
-2.5
12 23 IM Aravindh Chithambaram IND 2485 7.0
5.4
13 54   Beradze Irakli GEO 2318 7.0
47.4
14 9 GM Indjic Aleksandar SRB 2554 7.0
-8.1
15 15 GM Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2524 6.5
1.9
16 4 GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2635 6.5
-13.5
17 20 GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE 2496 6.5
-4.5
18 25 IM Tari Aryan NOR 2450 6.5
10.4
  40 IM Ider Borya FRA 2394 6.5
1.8
20 22 IM Ducarmon Quinten NED 2487 6.5
-4.8
21 43 FM Bersamina Paulo PHI 2380 6.5
22.4
22 19 IM Karthikeyan Murali IND 2499 6.5
-13.7
23 36 FM Csonka Balazs HUN 2409 6.5
3.1
24 35   Repka Christopher SVK 2418 6.5
-3.4

Top results after Round ten

Title Name FED Rtg
Res.
Title Name FED Rtg
WGM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI 2366
0-1
WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS 2430
WIM Zhai Mo CHN 2339
½-½
FM Pustovoitova Daria RUS 2354
WIM Chumpitaz Ann PER 2201
1-0
WIM Iwanow Anna POL 2279
IM Arabidze Meri GEO 2409
½-½
WGM Padmini Rout IND 2331
  Nandhidhaa Pv IND 2174
½-½
WFM Petrukhina Irina RUS 2218
  Gelip Ioana ROU 2154
0-1
WFM Srija Seshadri IND 2099
WIM Nguyen Thi Mai Hung VIE 2299
½-½
WIM Frayna Janelle Mae PHI 2140
WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE 2271
1-0
WFM Varshini V IND 2066
  Monpeurt Cyrielle FRA 2115
0-1
WGM Mona Khaled EGY 2191
WFM Pujari Rucha IND 2113
½-½
WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND 2165
WFM Gevorgyan Maria ARM 2160
1-0
  Michelle Catherina P IND 2099
WIM Fronda Jan Jodilyn PHI 2127
1-0
  Madhurima Shekhar IND 2000
WFM Sviridova Vlada RUS 2069
0-1
FM Brunello Marina ITA 2275
  Pratyusha Bodda IND 2078
0-1
WIM Kurbonboeva Sarvinoz UZB 2212
WFM Vaishali R IND 2120
1-0
  Imeeva Aysa RUS 2077

Top rankings after Round ten

Rk. SNo Title Name FED RtgI Pts.
rtg+/-
1 1 WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS 2430 8.5
8.4
2 15 WIM Chumpitaz Ann PER 2201 7.5
49.0
3 3 WGM Khademalsharieh Sara. IRI 2366 7.0
-2.4
4 4 FM Pustovoitova Daria RUS 2354 7.0
7.2
5 6 WGM Padmini Rout IND 2331 7.0
16.4
6 5 WIM Zhai Mo CHN 2339 7.0
-8.2
7 30 WFM Srija Seshadri IND 2099 7.0
68.8
8 17   Nandhidhaa Pv IND 2174 6.5
64.4
9 11 WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE 2271 6.5
-1.2
10 9 WIM Iwanow Anna POL 2279 6.5
-2.2
11 2 IM Arabidze Meri GEO 2409 6.5
-17.7
12 16 WGM Mona Khaled EGY 2191 6.5
0.4
13 13 WFM Petrukhina Irina RUS 2218 6.5
-10.0
14 19 WFM Gevorgyan Maria ARM 2160 6.5
5.8
15 18 WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND 2165 6.0
44.8
16 20   Gelip Ioana ROU 2154 6.0
6.6
17 21 WIM Frayna Janelle Mae PHI 2140 6.0
32.4
18 41 WIM Gu Tianlu CHN 2055 6.0
106.0
19 10 FM Brunello Marina ITA 2275 6.0
-30.4
20 27 WFM Pujari Rucha IND 2113 6.0
15.8
21 8 WIM Nguyen Thi Mai Hung VIE 2299 6.0
-34.4
22 14 WIM Kurbonboeva Sarvinoz UZB 2212 6.0
-42.4
23 76   Potluri Supreetha IND 1738 6.0
181.2
24 23 WIM Fronda Jan Jodilyn PHI 2127 6.0
-13.0
25 25 WFM Vaishali R IND 2120 6.0
-12.8

All the above pictures were taken by Amruta Mokal

Live video commentary on the official site by our reporters Sagar Shah and V. Saravanan

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
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