World Junior R04+05: Many leaders, close games

by Sagar Shah
10/11/2014 – A tournament like World Juniors is more about endurance than anything else. With 13 rounds in both Open and Girls event it makes perfect sense to pace yourself for this long event rather than going all out at the start and running out of steam towards the end. After five rounds there were three leaders in the Open section, ten with the Girls. Big pictorial report by Sagar Shah.

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Rounds four and five: Many leaders!

By Sagar Shah

After five rounds in the girls section we already have as many as ten players in the lead with a score of 4.0/5, while in the open event three lads have run ahead of the field: GM Cori Jorge (2612) of Peru, GM Lu Shanglei (2533) from China and IM S.L. Naryananan (2420) from India. Let's get into the thick of action with the help of some pictures.

The best part about World Juniors is that it helps to build camaraderie amongst players of different nations. In the above picture you see two young talented players, IM Aryan Tari (2450) of Norway having a light moment with GM Sahaj Grover (2496) of India before the game.

IM Prasanna Rao wishes luck to IM Srinath Narayanan before the latter takes on
GM Vidit Gujrathi in the fifth round

And so what if you are opponents and playing on the top board! It's always fun to catch up with each other before the round. Sarasadat Khadelmasharieh of Iran played Padmini Rout on the top board in the fifth round. The game was quite weird as the players agreed to a draw in a position where White had a nearly decisive advantage.

[Event "Pune"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.10"] [Round "5"] [White "Khademalsharieh, Sarasadat"] [Black "Padmini, Rout"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E90"] [WhiteElo "2366"] [BlackElo "2331"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "82"] [EventDate "2014.10.06"] [EventRounds "13"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. d4 g6 2. Nf3 Bg7 3. c4 Nf6 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e4 d6 6. h3 e5 7. d5 Nh5 8. Nh2 a5 9. g3 Na6 10. Be2 Nf6 11. g4 c6 12. Be3 cxd5 13. cxd5 Nd7 14. Qd2 Ndc5 15. Rg1 Bd7 16. Nf1 b5 17. Ng3 b4 18. Nd1 Qe7 19. f3 Rfc8 20. Nf2 Rc7 21. Kf1 Rac8 22. Kg2 Qe8 23. h4 Bb5 24. Rac1 Na4 25. Rxc7 Rxc7 26. Rc1 Rxc1 27. Qxc1 N6c5 28. Qc2 Qb8 29. b3 Nc3 30. Bxb5 Qxb5 31. Bd2 Ne2 32. Nxe2 Qxe2 33. Qd1 Qxd1 34. Nxd1 Bf6 35. g5 Bd8 36. Nb2 f6 37. Be3 Nb7 38. Nc4 f5 39. Ba7 fxe4 40. fxe4 Kf7 41. Kf3 -- ({The most surprising part of this game is that the white player agreed to a draw here. The position is completely one sided and White has a simple winning plan based on Ne3-g4, keeping the threat of Nf6 in the air, and the white king has a direct route to the queenside via e2-d3-c4-b5.} 41... Bc7 42. Ne3 Ke7 43. Ke2 Nd8 44. Ng4 Nf7 45. Kd3 $18 {[%cal Gd3c4,Gc4b5]}) 1/2-1/2

At the start of a five and a half hour battle. The top board 2600+ encounter between Jorge Cori (2612) and Wei Yi (2641) lived up to its expectation as the players battled it out hard and was the last game to finish in the playing hall. Wei Yi must be livid with himself for not converting a position where he had a clear advantage, but as we all should know by now the endgame is Jorge Cori's forte. Thus he maintained his lead with 4.5/5.

[Event "WCh U20"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.10"] [Round "5"] [White "Cori, Jorge"] [Black "Wei, Yi"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A16"] [WhiteElo "2612"] [BlackElo "2641"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "150"] [EventDate "2014.10.06"] [EventRounds "13"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. h4 Bg7 6. h5 Nc6 7. g3 Bg4 8. h6 Bf6 9. Bg2 O-O 10. O-O Bxf3 11. Bxf3 e6 12. Bg2 Qd7 13. Ne4 Be7 14. d3 Rad8 15. Bd2 Nd4 16. Rc1 b6 17. Ng5 c5 18. Nf3 Bf6 19. Rb1 e5 20. Nxd4 exd4 21. Bf3 Rfe8 22. Kg2 Re5 23. Rh1 Rde8 24. a3 {After an unusual opening, things have gone horribly wrong for Jorge Cori. He lacks space and Black has complete control over the position. Wei Yi logically increases the pressure:} g5 $1 25. Qb3 $6 Rxe2 $5 (25... g4 {was the most obvious and best move.} 26. Bxd5 Rxd5 $15 {and only one side can be better in this position, and that is Black.}) 26. Rbe1 $1 {A very calm and level headed defensive move by White which keeps Black's advantage to the minimum.} (26. Bxe2 Rxe2 $15 {would lead to a dangerous position for White.} 27. Qd1 Qc6 $1 {The very shrewd move prepared by Wei Yi.} 28. Kf1 Rxd2 $1 29. Qxd2 Nc3 {[%cal Gc3b1,Gc6h1]} 30. Rg1 Nxb1 31. Qe1 Nc3 32. bxc3 dxc3 $15) 26... Rxe1 27. Rxe1 Rxe1 28. Bxe1 {Of course only Black can play for a win here. White is not just a pawn down but the h6 pawn is also weak. His only compensating factor is the bishop pair.} Ne7 29. Qd1 Nf5 30. Bg4 Qc6+ 31. Qf3 $6 (31. Bf3 {was much better.}) 31... Qxf3+ 32. Kxf3 Nxh6 {Two pawns up. The most important thing for Black now is to coordinate his position. } 33. Bc8 Kf8 34. Ke4 Ng8 {Stopping Kd5 thanks to Ne7+} 35. b4 Bd8 36. bxc5 bxc5 37. a4 Ne7 38. Bd7 Kg7 39. f4 f5+ $6 {Unnecessarily giving Back a pawn, which helps White to erect a fortress.} (39... gxf4 40. Kxf4 Bc7+ 41. Kf3 h5 $1 $17 {Black should not have too many problems converting this position.}) 40. Bxf5 Nxf5 41. Kxf5 gxf4 42. Kxf4 {Now Cori plays excellently and the Chinese player is unable to break through.} Kf6 43. g4 Bc7+ 44. Ke4 Kg5 45. Kf3 Bd6 ( 45... Bf4 46. Ba5 Bc1 47. Bd8+ Kg6 48. Ke4 $11) 46. Bf2 Bb8 47. Be1 Bc7 48. Bf2 Kf6 49. Ke4 Ke6 50. Be1 Kd6 51. Bd2 Kc6 52. Be1 Bd6 53. Bd2 Bc7 54. Be1 Bd8 55. Bd2 Bh4 56. Ba5 Be7 57. Bd2 Bf6 58. Be1 Bg5 59. Ba5 Bc1 60. Bd8 Bb2 61. Be7 Bc3 62. Bf6 Ba5 63. Bh4 Bb6 64. Be1 Bc7 65. Bd2 Bb8 66. Be1 Kb6 67. Bd2 Bg3 68. Kd5 Bf2 69. Kc4 Kc6 70. Bh6 Bg3 71. Bf8 Bd6 72. Bh6 Be7 73. Bf4 Bf8 74. Bg3 Bd6 75. Bh4 Bf8 1/2-1/2

Playing in stealth mode! Can you guess who this player is?

It is the other player currently in the lead, GM Lu Shanglei (2533). He was not only able to draw effortlessly against GM Vidit Gujrathi (2635) with the black pieces in round four, but also came out all guns blazing when he beat GM Karen Grigoryan (2591) of Armenia in round five.

Lu Shanglei (left) with his trainer Li Wenliang

Li Wenliang was also the coach of the Chinese team that won the Gold in Tromso Olympiad 2014. He is an International Master with a rating of 2429, and also a FIDE Senior Trainer (FST). After Lu Shanglei's wonderful win in the round five, Li Wenliang mentioned that our previous ChessBase report, where we wrote about Lu Shanglei beating Magnus Carlsen in blitz, gave him the confidence to play his best!

The two Russian girls WGM Aleksandra Goryachkina (2430) and FM Daria Pustovoitova (2354) played each other in round four and drew their game. Currently both of them are in the leaders pack with 4.0/5. Surely they are the biggest contenders for the title.

The man in form: IM S.L. Narayanan (2420) who is on 4.5/5

One of the biggest surprises of the tournament has been IM Sunilduth L. Narayanan. Not only does he have a rating performance of 2742 but he has already gained 18 Elo points, and on his way to 4.5/5, he has beaten two very strong GMs: Kamil Dragun and (2546) and GM Kovalev Vladislav (2548). The young lad from Kerela is a fighter and never gives up. In his game against Kamil Dragun, he was worse for majority part, but when the opportunity presented itself he leapt at it with both hands.

[Event "World Junior Chess Championship-2014(Op"] [Site "Pune,India"] [Date "2014.10.09"] [Round "4"] [White "Dragun, Kamil"] [Black "Narayanan, Sunilduth L"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D36"] [WhiteElo "2546"] [BlackElo "2420"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "94"] [EventDate "2014.10.09"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. Rc1 Nbd7 7. cxd5 exd5 8. e3 c6 9. h3 Re8 10. Bd3 Nf8 11. O-O Ng6 12. Bh2 Bd6 13. Bxd6 Qxd6 14. Qc2 Qe7 { As Narayanan mentioned after the game, the reason why he chose this line is that the rook is slightly misplaced on c1. He has to be on b1 to start the minority attack with b4-b5. Thus he gains a tempo.} 15. Rb1 Ne4 16. Bxe4 dxe4 17. Nd2 Bf5 (17... f5 {was definitely the better way to defend the pawn.}) 18. f4 h5 (18... exf3 19. Qxf5 Qxe3+ 20. Rf2 $16) 19. b4 Rad8 20. b5 Nh4 21. bxc6 bxc6 22. Kh2 Qe6 23. Nb3 Rb8 24. Qf2 Qf6 25. Nc5 $16 {White has a clearly better position on the queenside and black attack has no prospects on the kingside. Kamil Dragun should be happy with his opening result.} Rb6 26. a4 $6 {The start of an incorrect plan.} (26. N5a4 Rbb8 27. Rb3 $16 {with the idea of doubling rooks would give White an excellent position.}) 26... Qd8 27. Rb2 Bg6 28. Rfb1 Nf5 $1 {As GM Abhijit Kunte rightly mentioned after the game, the knight on h4 was misplaced. It was important for White not to let it back into play. Once it is back in the game Black should not have too many issues.} 29. Nb7 $6 {Just losing the thread of the game.} Qe7 30. Nc5 Nxd4 $1 $15 { Narayanan does not miss his chance when presented. As he said after the game, Kamil Dragun was completely shocked to see this move and that explains his extremely weak next move.} 31. exd4 $2 (31. Rxb6 axb6 32. Nb3 Nf5 $17 {was relatively the best.}) 31... e3 $1 $19 32. Qe2 Bxb1 33. Rxb1 Rxb1 34. Nxb1 { The white knights are no match for the black rook. The game ends pretty quickly.} Qd6 35. Nd3 Qxd4 36. Kg3 c5 37. Na3 h4+ 38. Kg4 c4 39. Ne1 Qd2 40. Kf3 Re4 (40... f5 $1 $19 {was the fastest way.}) 41. g3 hxg3 42. Ng2 c3 43. Nc2 Rxa4 44. Ncxe3 Qxe2+ 45. Kxe2 Rd4 46. Kf3 Rd2 47. Ne1 g2 0-1

GM slayer S.L. Narayanan – you need to turn up your speakers to hear the soft spoken chess talent

 

Sai Vishwesh (2108) and R.Ganesh (2030) have gained a whopping 108 and 99 Elo points resepectively!

FIDE representative Robert Zsifkovits looks pretty happy with the settings at the World Juniors.
Here you can see him with WIM Elena Boric and young Indian player Nihal Sarin.

Ioana Gelip (2154) in a batman like thinking pose! She is one
of the leaders in the girls section with a score of 4.0/5.

Russian Karina Azimova (2063)

The very strong Iranian IM Idani Pouya (2517)

IM Toms Kantans (2485) from Latvia

Food for thought? Polish GM Jan-Krzysztof Duda (2599) in different rounds

Duda Jan-Krzysztof became a grandmaster at the age of 15 years and 21 days and at that time was the second youngest GM in the world (after Wei Yi). He has had a slightly slow start to this tournament with three draws and two wins, but is now getting into the groove. We can expect some great chess from him.

WIM Ann Chumpitaz, who is the leader in Girls section, GM Jorge Cori who is leading the
O open section, WFM Caballero Quijano Mitzy Mishe from Peru and US American Claudia Munoz

An informal video with Peruvian Ann Chumpitaz teaching Jorge Cori the piano. Don't miss Jorge in the background experimenting with the Flea Waltz, Beethoven's Für Elise and Mozart's Alla Turca – talk about ambitious! This is what you must aim for, Jorge: Flea Walz, Elise, Mozart (check out Yuja Wang showing off)

Nader Mohammed and Mona Khaled from Egypt with
Alexandra Terzidaki and Konstantinos Megalios from Greece

See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil!

That's how intense it gets when you are trying to save a lost endgame against a
2661 rated player. IM Tadeas Kriebel (right) against Vladimir Fedoseev.

GM Erwin L'Ami came to commentary room and had a wonderful discussion with IM Sagar Shah

GM Farrukh Amonatov and commentator IM V. Saravanan and indulged in deep and
high-class analysis of the top board game Jorge Cori vs Wei Yi

Interview with Erwin L'Ami begins at 1 hour and 11 minutes
and analysis with Farrukh Amonatov at 2 hours and 15 minutes

Results and standings

Before we could publish this report the sixth round of the World Junior Championship had been completed. In the following we bring you the results of the top pairings and the tournament standings after six rounds. Our next report will come after round seven.

Top results of Round six

Bo. Ti. Name FED Rtg
Res.
Ti. Name FED Rtg
1 GM Lu Shanglei CHN 2533
½-½
GM Cori Jorge PER 2612
2 GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2661
½-½
IM Sunilduth Narayanan IND 2420
3 GM Wei Yi CHN 2641
½-½
GM Grover Sahaj IND 2491
4 IM Bai Jinshi CHN 2406
½-½
GM Bok Benjamin NED 2591
5 FM Bersamina Paulo PHI 2380
0-1
GM Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2524
6 GM Van Kampen Robin NED 2641
½-½
IM Das Sayantan IND 2445
7 GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2635
0-1
IM Tari Aryan NOR 2450
8 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2599
½-½
IM Narayanan Srinath IND 2443
9 GM Grigoryan Karen ARM 2591
1-0
  Repka Christopher SVK 2418
10 GM Oparin Grigoriy RUS 2552
1-0
  Sai Vishwesh.C IND 2151
11 IM Ghosh Diptayan IND 2508
½-½
GM Kovalev Vladislav BLR 2548
12 FM Arat Ufuk Sezen TUR 2357
½-½
GM Dragun Kamil POL 2546
13 GM Abasov Nijat AZE 2528
½-½
  Harsha Bharathakoti IND 2297
14 GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE 2496
1-0
GM Ankit R. Rajpara IND 2508
15   Navalgund Niranjan IND 2267
½-½
IM Karthikeyan Murali IND 2499
16 FM Gaehwiler Gabriel SUI 2360
0-1
GM Indjic Aleksandar SRB 2554
17 IM Idani Pouya IRI 2517
½-½
CM Prince Bajaj IND 2369
18 IM Ducarmon Quinten NED 2487
1-0
  Mithil Ajgaonkar IND 2258
19 IM Borisenko Viacheslav UKR 2316
0-1
IM Aravindh Chithambaram IND 2485
20 IM Kantans Toms LAT 2485
½-½
  Kumaran B IND 2279

Standings after Round six

Rk. SNo Ti. Name FED RtgI Pts.
rtg+/-
1 5 GM Cori Jorge PER 2612 5.0
9.2
2 15 GM Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2524 5.0
6.8
3 13 GM Lu Shanglei CHN 2533 5.0
14.9
4 32 IM Sunilduth Lyna Narayanan IND 2420 5.0
21.5
5 3 GM Wei Yi CHN 2641 4.5
2.2
6 1 GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2661 4.5
-4.5
7 8 GM Grigoryan Karen H. ARM 2591 4.5
0.6
8 21 GM Grover Sahaj IND 2491 4.5
6.0
9 37 IM Bai Jinshi CHN 2406 4.5
17.3
10 10 GM Oparin Grigoriy RUS 2552 4.5
-3.1
11 20 GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE 2496 4.5
0.2
12 25 IM Tari Aryan NOR 2450 4.5
11.5
13 7 GM Bok Benjamin NED 2591 4.5
-4.2
14 2 GM Van Kampen Robin NED 2641 4.0
-8.2
15 59   Harsha Bharathakoti IND 2297 4.0
24.8
16 6 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2599 4.0
-6.7
17 11 GM Kovalev Vladislav BLR 2548 4.0
1.2
18 22 IM Ducarmon Quinten NED 2487 4.0
-3.2
19 48 FM Arat Ufuk Sezen TUR 2357 4.0
22.6
20 18 IM Ghosh Diptayan IND 2508 4.0
0.6
21 12 GM Dragun Kamil POL 2546 4.0
-9.1
22 14 GM Abasov Nijat AZE 2528 4.0
-9.2
  127   Yogit S IND 1954 4.0
128.8
24 28 IM Narayanan Srinath IND 2443 4.0
7.2
25 63   Navalgund Niranjan IND 2267 4.0
28.2
26 30 IM Kriebel Tadeas CZE 2428 4.0
-3.4
27 27 IM Das Sayantan IND 2445 4.0
1.6
28 23 IM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. IND 2485 4.0
-4.3
29 43 FM Bersamina Paulo PHI 2380 4.0
-2.6
30 67   K. Praneeth Surya IND 2251 4.0
5.2
31 9 GM Indjic Aleksandar SRB 2554 4.0
-10.9
  29 IM Anurag Mhamal IND 2442 4.0
-8.4
33 39 FM Johansson Linus SWE 2401 4.0
-11.0
  86   Rajdeep Sarkar IND 2145 4.0
68.0
35 36 FM Csonka Balazs HUN 2409 4.0
-9.1

Top results of Round six

Bo. Title Name FED Rtg Res. Title Name FED Rtg
1 WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE 2271 ½-½ WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS 2430
2 WGM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI 2366 ½-½ WIM Chumpitaz Ann PER 2201
3 FM Pustovoitova Daria RUS 2354 1-0 WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND 2165
4 WIM Zhai Mo CHN 2339 ½-½   Nandhidhaa Pv IND 2174
5 WGM Padmini Rout IND 2331 1-0   Gelip Ioana ROU 2154
6 WFM Vaishali R IND 2120 0-1 WIM Iwanow Anna POL 2279
7 WFM Monnisha Gk IND 2069 ½-½ FM Brunello Marina ITA 2275
8 WIM Frayna Janelle Mae PHI 2140 1-0 WFM Saranya J IND 2107
9   Pratyusha Bodda IND 2078 1-0 IM Arabidze Meri GEO 2409
10 WIM Nguyen Thi Mai Hung VIE 2299 1-0   Vantika Agrawal IND 1881
11 WFM Sviridova Vlada RUS 2069 1-0 WIM Varga Klara HUN 2232
12 WFM Petrukhina Irina RUS 2218 1-0 WFM Tarini Goyal IND 1868
13 WIM Gu Tianlu CHN 2055 1-0 WGM Mona Khaled EGY 2191
14 WFM Pujari Rucha IND 2113 1-0   Imeeva Aysa RUS 2077
15   Aakanksha Hagawane IND 1926 0-1 WFM Srija Seshadri IND 2099
16   Madhurima Shekhar IND 2000 ½-½ WIM Ni Shiqun CHN 2312

Standings after Round six

Rk. SNo Title Name FED RtgI Pts. rtg+/-
1 4 FM Pustovoitova Daria RUS 2354 5.0 15.4
2 6 WGM Padmini Rout IND 2331 5.0 15.8
3 3 WGM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI 2366 4.5 -1.6
4 1 WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS 2430 4.5 -3.0
5 15 WIM Chumpitaz Ann PER 2201 4.5 15.2
6 5 WIM Zhai Mo CHN 2339 4.5 -6.2
7 11 WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE 2271 4.5 6.2
  17   Nandhidhaa Pv IND 2174 4.5 58.4
9 9 WIM Iwanow Anna POL 2279 4.5 -4.2
10 21 WIM Frayna Janelle Mae PHI 2140 4.5 33.2
11 37 WFM Sviridova Vlada RUS 2069 4.0 39.6
12 18 WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND 2165 4.0 51.2
  34   Pratyusha Bodda IND 2078 4.0 82.0
14 36 WFM Monnisha Gk IND 2069 4.0 42.0
15 13 WFM Petrukhina Irina RUS 2218 4.0 -7.6
16 8 WIM Nguyen Thi Mai Hung VIE 2299 4.0 -15.0
  20   Gelip Ioana ROU 2154 4.0 4.8
18 41 WIM Gu Tianlu CHN 2055 4.0 76.8
19 30 WFM Srija Seshadri IND 2099 4.0 -0.4
20 27 WFM Pujari Rucha IND 2113 4.0 11.2
21 10 FM Brunello Marina ITA 2275 4.0 -13.6

All the above pictures were taken by Amruta Mokal

Live video commentary on the official site by our reporters Sagar Shah and V. Saravanan

Highlights of round four – Video reports by Vijay Kumar

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Sagar is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
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Steven E DuCharm Steven E DuCharm 10/12/2014 12:28
seconded!
Tomhanks Tomhanks 10/11/2014 11:07
awesome report and pictures!!
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