Web publishing with ChessBase 12 (part 2/3)

by Albert Silver
12/26/2013 – In this second part on publishing on the web, you learn how to make use of the powerful new javascript replayer, exactly as in the ChessBase News pages, with fancy pieces, figuring notation, highlighted squares and arrows, and more. You can also easily embed these into a personal blog or professional resources, and even publish a replayable game on Facebook in seconds.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

In part one, we saw how to use the output functions to produce classic notation with diagrams for use in a web page or blog, which is always an important tool in telling about chess, but sticking to that is fairly old school. The reason is that it treats the online experience as if it were simply digitalized paper, when there is no need for such self-imposed restrictions. Chessbase 12 brought in its bag of tricks an invaluable tool for bloggers or auteurs: a brand new javascript replayer with advanced tools. This replayer is more than just a facelift with nicer pieces than the previous version. Compared to the older version:

  • It does have nicer pieces and board with better contrast, as well as more responsive replay buttons
  • It displays all the visual cues such as highlighted squares and arrows,
  • The notation displays pieces for universal recognition
  • If the moves contain numerical evaluations, they will be displayed as a bar chart
  • Can publish several games with a drop-down menu
  • It brings a board that will seek to remain visible if the notation scrolls down

In this second part, you will discover how to publish a game on Facebook, or any social network in seconds (literally), or embed it in your web pages or blog.

The first thing of course is to annotate a game, if you plan on publishing it with
comments, and so forth. Though it is hardly forced.

Publishing a game on Facebook

This is by far the easiest thing to do, so let's start with that.

Once the game is ready, just click on File, and Publish to Web

A small pop-up will appear: choose One Click Publication. Be sure you have an
active internet connection.

Your browser will open with a new webpage contianing the replayer and your game.
This is not a file on your computer, and is hosted indefinitely at ChessBase's servers.
The URL (or web address) at the top is the link to your game, which anyone can
access to see it. Click here to see it for real.

Copy that address and paste it on Facebook. It shows a generic title "An interesting
game" and description "My Game", but you can edit those by clicking on them
before pressing Post. Now anyone who clicks on your link will see the game and
replayer.

Publishing a game on a web page or blog

Click on File, then select Publish on Web

A pop-up will appear, and this time you want to choose "Create a HTML File".
It will ask you for a name and a location to save it.

You can perfectly well open the HTML file in an HTML editor, your browser (right-click
and select "View page source") or even Notepad. The HTML code you want to copy to
include in your page is located between <body> and </body>. Copy it and then paste
it where you would like the replayer and game to appear. Even if you are not an old-hand
blogger, it will take you less than a minute after you have done it a couple of times.

The result will look something like this (though it won't have any ads):

[Event "Don Dailey Tribute 8CPU"] [Site "ChessGUI2"] [Date "2013.12.23"] [Round "15.4"] [White "Stockfish 101213 64-bit 8CPU"] [Black "Hannibal 1.4b 64-bit 8CPU"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E12"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [TimeControl "40/1740:40/1740:40/1740"] {Xeon X5430x2 Octal} 1. d4 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 2. c4 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} e6 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 3. Nf3 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} b6 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 4. a3 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} Bb7 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 5. Nc3 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} d5 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 6. cxd5 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0: 00:00]} Nxd5 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 7. Qc2 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} Nxc3 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} 8. bxc3 {[%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00]} c5 { [%eval 0,1] [%emt 0:00:00] This was the last book move. Now both engines are on their own.} 9. e4 {[%eval 36,27] [%emt 0:01:02]} Nd7 {[%eval -25,25] [%emt 0:01:22]} 10. Bb5 {[%eval 28,29] [%emt 0:01:00]} a6 {[%eval -25,26] [%emt 0:00: 52]} 11. Bd3 {[%eval 27,29] [%emt 0:00:31]} Qc7 {[%eval -25,25] [%emt 0:00:50]} 12. Qb1 {[%eval 27,31] [%emt 0:00:43]} b5 {[%eval -11,24] [%emt 0:02:21]} 13. O-O {[%eval 12,24] [%emt 0:00:33]} Nb6 {[%eval -2,21] [%emt 0:00:29] By neglecting king safety, the engine Hannibal will soon find itself fighting for its life. Stockfish expected Bd6.} 14. a4 {[%eval 66,30] [%emt 0:00:36]} Nxa4 { [%eval 6,23] [%emt 0:00:54]} 15. Bf4 {[%eval 54,31] [%emt 0:00:28]} Qxf4 { [%eval -16,26] [%emt 0:00:48]} ({Upon} 15... Qc8 {White had} 16. c4 $1 Nc3 17. Qb3 b4 18. d5 $1 $16 {and the problem is that the knight on c3 is trapped with nowhere to go. White will play Bd2 and Bxc3 and Black can do nothing against this.} Be7 19. Bd2 O-O 20. Bxc3 bxc3 21. Qxc3 {[%csl Rb7,Re7] and White has a clear advantage. Black's bishops are severely restricted.}) 16. Bxb5+ $1 { [%eval 62,34] [%emt 0:00:49] The point.} Kd8 {[%eval -7,28] [%emt 0:00:46]} ( 16... axb5 $4 {loses outright to} 17. Qxb5+ Kd8 18. Qxb7 Qb8 19. Qxf7 Ra7 20. Qxe6 $18) 17. Bxa4 {[%eval 56,34] [%emt 0:00:43]} Bxe4 {[%eval -18,30] [%emt 0: 03:14]} 18. Qb6+ {[%eval 68,34] [%emt 0:00:40]} Qc7 {[%eval -17,31] [%emt 0:00: 37]} 19. dxc5 {[%eval 62,34] [%emt 0:00:39]} Bxc5 {[%eval -19,29] [%emt 0:00: 00]} ({Upon} 19... Bxf3 {White had the spectacular resource} 20. Rfd1+ $1 { [%cal Ya4d7,Rd1d8]} Bd5 {forced.} (20... Bxd1 {loses very quickly to} 21. Rxd1+ Kc8 22. Bd7+ Kd8 23. Bxe6+) 21. c4 $1) 20. Rfd1+ {[%eval 105,29] [%emt 0:00:31] } Bd5 {[%eval -29,30] [%emt 0:00:29]} 21. Qb3 {[%eval 46,30] [%emt 0:01:13]} Ke7 {[%eval -17,25] [%emt 0:01:43]} 22. Rxd5 $1 {[%eval 34,30] [%emt 0:00:45]} exd5 {[%eval -19,24] [%emt 0:00:00]} 23. Qxd5 {[%eval 68,32] [%emt 0:00:42]} Rad8 {[%eval -56,26] [%emt 0:01:45]} 24. Qf5 {[%eval 56,34] [%emt 0:01:04]} Qc8 {[%eval -38,27] [%emt 0:00:27]} 25. Qh5 {[%eval 62,33] [%emt 0:01:01]} Kf8 { [%eval -48,26] [%emt 0:00:43]} 26. Bb3 {[%eval 88,32] [%emt 0:00:49][%csl Yf7] [%cal Rh5f7,Rb3f7]} Rd7 {[%eval -79,23] [%emt 0:00:27]} 27. Ne5 {[%eval 103,32] [%emt 0:00:38]} Re7 {[%eval -92,25] [%emt 0:00:51]} 28. Rd1 {[%eval 113,34] [%emt 0:00:55]} g6 {[%eval -70,30] [%emt 0:00:37]} 29. Nxg6+ $3 {[%eval 98,35] [%emt 0:01:03] An easy enough move for an engine, but lovely nonetheless.} fxg6 {[%eval -72,29] [%emt 0:00:00]} (29... hxg6 30. Qxh8#) 30. Qh6+ {[%eval 107,35] [%emt 0:00:42]} Rg7 {[%eval -75,31] [%emt 0:00:49]} 31. Qf4+ {[%eval 107,37] [%emt 0:00:56]} Qf5 {[%eval -66,31] [%emt 0:00:34]} 32. Rd8+ {[%eval 98,36] [%emt 0:01:09]} Ke7 {[%eval -64,8] [%emt 0:00:00]} 33. Qxf5 {[%eval 98,37] [%emt 0:00:57]} gxf5 {[%eval -66,6] [%emt 0:00:00]} 34. Rxh8 {[%eval 98,37] [%emt 0:00:45] White now converts the endgame with great virtuosity.} Kf6 { [%eval -85,31] [%emt 0:03:06]} 35. Rc8 {[%eval 181,34] [%emt 0:00:42]} Rb7 { [%eval -84,31] [%emt 0:00:48]} 36. Rc6+ {[%eval 175,35] [%emt 0:00:44]} Ke7 { [%eval -87,31] [%emt 0:00:39]} 37. Rxc5 {[%eval 202,35] [%emt 0:01:35]} Rxb3 { [%eval -81,32] [%emt 0:00:51]} 38. h3 {[%eval 202,37] [%emt 0:01:09]} Ke6 { [%eval -111,32] [%emt 0:01:02]} 39. g4 {[%eval 202,41] [%emt 0:01:15]} fxg4 { [%eval -90,30] [%emt 0:00:36]} 40. hxg4 {[%eval 202,45] [%emt 0:01:40]} Ra3 { [%eval -90,32] [%emt 0:01:01]} 41. Kg2 {[%eval 216,36] [%emt 0:00:42]} a5 { [%eval -106,33] [%emt 0:00:39]} 42. c4 {[%eval 216,38] [%emt 0:00:45]} a4 { [%eval -103,34] [%emt 0:00:36]} 43. Rh5 {[%eval 332,35] [%emt 0:00:45]} Rc3 { [%eval -162,27] [%emt 0:01:03]} 44. Rxh7 {[%eval 368,39] [%emt 0:00:58]} Kd6 { [%eval -171,29] [%emt 0:01:07]} 45. f4 {[%eval 573,33] [%emt 0:00:48]} Rc2+ { [%eval -208,26] [%emt 0:00:52]} 46. Kg3 {[%eval 830,31] [%emt 0:00:45]} Rxc4 { [%eval -395,29] [%emt 0:04:20]} 47. g5 {[%eval 1200,31] [%emt 0:00:37]} Rc1 { [%eval -405,29] [%emt 0:00:34]} 48. Kg4 {[%eval 1535,30] [%emt 0:00:52]} Rc7 { [%eval -582,27] [%emt 0:04:14]} 49. Rh6+ {[%eval 3366,29] [%emt 0:01:10]} Ke7 { [%eval -905,27] [%emt 0:02:57]} 50. Ra6 {[%eval 8939,34] [%emt 0:00:51]} Rd7 { [%eval -904,25] [%emt 0:00:23]} 51. g6 {[%eval 13702,33] [%emt 0:04:50]} Rd1 { [%eval -2064,30] [%emt 0:04:38] (Kd8)} 1-0

The game above was taken from a series of engine games running on eight cores held at Playchess by Graham Banks. My thanks to him for providing the PGN with the original computer evaluations.

In part three, you will learn how to publish several games with a drop-down menu, as well as learn some tips on presenting just parts of games, combinations, studies, and more. 



Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register