Unstoppable Ni Hua crushes the Australian Open

by Sagar Shah
1/14/2015 – It was the penultimate round of the Australian Open 2015. The Chinese GM Ni Hua was up against the young Australian IM Moulthun Ly. At this point Ni Hua stood at 8.5/9 with a 1.5 point lead ahead of his nearest rival. Instead of playing it safe, he went on to win with a fantastic 10.5/11 taking his rating to 2704. In this illustrated report, Sagar Shah analyzes the secret to his success.

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Ly Moulthun vs Ni Hua playing each other in the penultimate round of the tournament

Ni Hua was black and his opponent had proved his mettle previously by winning the Sydney Open in 2014 ahead of strong players like Van Wely and Nisipeanu. In such cases there is a strong feeling of playing it safe and making a draw and ensuring that you were the champion irrespective of the last round result. After all, $6000 is not bad! Many of us would think this way but not a champion like Ni Hua. He played the most ambitious line of the Ragozin, went into an extremely complicated middlegame and after a brutal exchange of punches in the endgame emerged victorious. It was a game that proved what a fighter this Chinese player was. More than the results he was focused on the struggle; more than the first place, he valued a good game of chess.

[Event "Australian Open 2015"] [Site "Sydney AUS"] [Date "2015.01.10"] [Round "10.1"] [White "Ly, Moulthun"] [Black "Ni, Hua"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D38"] [WhiteElo "2460"] [BlackElo "2689"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "120"] [EventDate "2015.01.02"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 c5 8. e3 c4 {This is the same line that was used by Yu Yangyi against Giri in the Qatar Open 2014. It is highly possible that the two Chinese players who were playing side by side in the Olympiad 2014 had exchanged ideas and notes on this opening.} 9. Nd2 (9. Be2 {was Giri's choice but Black got a very fine position after} Bf5) 9... g5 10. Bg3 Bf5 11. Be5 (11. h4 $5 {How good is this move?} g4 12. Be2 Nc6 13. Be5 Bxc3 14. bxc3 h5 15. Bxf6 Qxf6 16. e4 dxe4 17. Nxc4 $14 { looks like at least a small edge for White.}) 11... Bxc3 {Of course this knight has to be taken as the d5 pawn was attacked.} 12. bxc3 Nbd7 {Is the knight much better placed on d7 than on c6? I don't think so but Nc6 fails tactically and hence Nbd7 has to be played.} (12... Nc6 $2 13. Qf3 $1 $18) 13. Bd6 (13. Be2 Nxe5 14. dxe5 Nd7 15. e4 Bxe4 16. Nxe4 dxe4 17. Qd4 Qe7 18. e6 Nf6 19. Bxc4 fxe6 $11 {Saravanan-Goudriaan.}) 13... Qb6 (13... b5 {Trying to play Qb6 after the pawn has advanced is met with} 14. a4 $1 Qb6 15. Bb4 a5 16. axb5 $16) 14. Bb4 a5 15. Ba3 Qc6 {Black has the simple idea of b5 followed by Rb8 and getting in b4. Look at the powerful f5 bishop. It prevents Rb1. This has been a positional catastrophe for White in the opening.} 16. Be2 b5 17. O-O Rb8 18. f3 $6 {Too slow. It was necessary to fight the tide (a term Aagaard uses in his book Strategic play) and get some counterplay going.} (18. e4 $5 {I am not sure if this is the best but it is a decent try.} Nxe4 (18... dxe4 19. Re1 b4 20. Bb2 O-O 21. Rc1 $11 {The c4 pawn will fall.}) 19. Nxe4 Bxe4 20. f3 (20. Qe1 $5 Kd8 $1 $17 {How difficult it is to find such a move.}) 20... Bg6 21. Qd2 {It is unclear whether white has enough for the pawn but b4 has been stopped and the Black king is in the center. it should count for something.} f5 $1 $15 {With this strong move planning Kf7 Black keeps an advantage.}) 18... b4 19. Bb2 O-O 20. Rc1 Rfe8 (20... Nb6 {giving extra protection to the c-pawn was necessary.} 21. e4 Be6 $1 $15 (21... dxe4 $2 22. fxe4 Bxe4 23. cxb4 $14)) 21. e4 $1 {A good move by Moulthun Ly.} dxe4 22. cxb4 exf3 23. Rxf3 (23. Bxc4 $5 $14) 23... Rxe2 24. Qxe2 Bg4 25. Rxf6 Nxf6 26. Qe5 Nd7 27. Qxa5 Be6 28. a4 Ra8 29. b5 Qxg2+ 30. Kxg2 Rxa5 31. Nxc4 Rxa4 {After a sequence of quite forcing moves we have reached an endgame. The endgame is complicated but Black is better mainly because he has a good compact pawn structure while White pawns are weak. But those same pawns can become strength as well. So Black must remain careful.} 32. Nd6 Rb4 (32... Nb6 {was better.}) 33. Bc3 Rb3 34. Ba5 h5 35. Rc7 h4 36. Kg1 Rb1+ 37. Kf2 Rb2+ 38. Kg1 Bh3 39. Rc3 g4 {Ni Hua has combined his forces well to create some sort of a mating attack on the opponent's king.} 40. Bd8 Rg2+ 41. Kh1 Rb2 (41... Rf2 $5 42. Rc1 g3 43. hxg3 hxg3 44. Kg1 f5 $17) 42. Kg1 f6 43. Rc1 Kg7 44. b6 Kg6 45. b7 Bg2 46. Nc4 Re2 47. Rb1 Be4 48. Bxf6 (48. b8=Q Nxb8 49. Rxb8 g3 $1 50. hxg3 h3 $19) 48... Rg2+ (48... g3 $1 $19) 49. Kf1 Rxh2 $2 {This allows a phenomenal defence which is almost impossible for humans to consider.} 50. Rb6 $3 {And Moulthun is able to find it!} Kh7 $2 {And now White can even get the advantage} 51. Ne5 $2 (51. Rd6 $3 {This would have ended Ni Hua's brilliant run at the tournament.} Nb8 52. Rd8 Rh1+ 53. Ke2 Kg6 54. Rxb8 Bxb7 55. Rxb7 Kxf6 56. Ne3 $16 {White has excellent winning chances.}) 51... g3 $1 {Now it's all over. The queen cannot be prevented.} 52. b8=Q Nxb8 53. Rxb8 Rf2+ $1 (53... g2+ 54. Kf2 Rh1 55. Rh8# { was what Mouthun might have calculated.}) 54. Kg1 Rxf6 55. Re8 Ra6 56. Re7+ Kg8 57. Re8+ Kg7 58. Re7+ Kf6 59. Rf7+ Kg5 60. Rf1 h3 {A very tense game that was played well by both sides. Ly Moulthun surely looks like a candidate to become Australia's next GM pretty soon.} 0-1

After the tenth round victory Ni Hua raced to 9.5/10 and in the last round he had nothing to lose. He beat IM Bobby Cheng in smooth positional fashion to end the tournament with a phenomenal 10.5/11.

No mercy even in the last round! Ni Hua vs Bobby Cheng (1-0)

[Event "Australian Open 2015"] [Site "Sydney AUS"] [Date "2015.01.11"] [Round "11.1"] [White "Ni, Hua"] [Black "Cheng, Bobby"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A13"] [WhiteElo "2689"] [BlackElo "2436"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2015.01.02"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 a6 $5 {an interestin move preparing b5.} 4. Bg2 (4. Nc3 d5 {is the point. In this QGD black may have wasted a move with a6 but the bishop in not so well placed on g2.}) 4... b5 5. b3 (5. Nd4 {is a line trying to take advantage of the undefended a8 rook but it doesn't quite work for White.} c6 6. cxb5 axb5 7. Nxb5 cxb5 8. Bxa8 d5 {Black has a pretty good position.}) 5... c5 6. O-O Bb7 7. Nc3 Qa5 8. Bb2 Be7 9. e4 $1 {The key move.} b4 (9... Nxe4 10. Nxe4 Bxe4 11. Bxg7 Rg8 12. Bc3 b4 13. Bb2 $16 {With d4 coming up, White is clearly better.}) (9... d6 10. e5 dxe5 11. Nxe5 $14) 10. e5 bxc3 11. Bxc3 Qd8 12. exf6 Bxf6 13. Bxf6 Qxf6 14. d4 {By simple means Ni Hua has got a very pleasant opening advantage.} cxd4 15. Nxd4 Bxg2 16. Kxg2 O-O 17. Qf3 $1 Qxf3+ 18. Kxf3 {White has a nice queenside majority. His knight is well centralised, rooks are connected and his king is ready to join in the action. All this little plusses constitute White's advantage.} Rc8 (18... Nc6 19. Rfd1 (19. Nxc6 dxc6 {somehow improves Black's defensive chances as it's not easy to advance White's queenside majority.}) 19... Nxd4+ 20. Rxd4 Ra7 21. Rad1 $14 { Very pleasant to play chess when there are only two results possible!}) 19. Rad1 Kf8 20. Ke3 Ra7 21. f4 g6 22. g4 d5 $5 {Bobby Cheng plays actively and tries to open the d-file for the rook even at the cost of creating an isolated d-pawn.} 23. cxd5 exd5 24. Rc1 Re7+ 25. Kd2 Rce8 26. Rfe1 Rxe1 27. Rxe1 Rxe1 28. Kxe1 {What do you think about this endgame. I would say that it is close to draw than a win for White. But Black must play very accurately.} Ke7 29. Kd2 Kd6 30. b4 Nd7 (30... Nc6 {is impossible as it allows White to go into a king and pawn endgame where he has an outside passer.} 31. Nxc6 Kxc6 32. a4 $18) 31. a4 Nf6 32. g5 Nh5 33. Ke3 Ng7 34. Nf3 $1 {Trying to go to the e5 square.} Ke6 ( 34... Nf5+ 35. Kd3 Ng7 36. Ne5 Ne6 37. Ke3 Nd8 $14 {How white should breakthrough is still not so clear.}) 35. Kd4 Ne8 $2 (35... Kd6 36. Ne5 Ne6+ 37. Ke3 Nd8 $14) 36. Kc5 {The king has infiltrated into the enemy camp. Now it is all over.} Kf5 37. Nd4+ Ke4 38. b5 axb5 39. Nxb5 $1 {A wise decision. Knights have the greatest problems of defending against the rook pawn.} d4 40. Nxd4 Nc7 41. Kc6 (41. a5 {was easier.}) 41... Na6 42. Kb6 Nb4 43. Nc6 Nd5+ 44. Kb7 Nc3 45. a5 Kd5 46. a6 Nb5 47. Kb6 Nd6 48. Ne7+ Ke6 49. a7 {A very nice technical game by Ni Hua who gave no chances to his opponent.} 1-0

And guess the number of points by which Ni Hua won the tournament? 2.5 points! Such a score is simply unheard of in modern day tournaments.

Ni Hua received the first prize of $6000 after scoring 10.5/11 and with a performance of
2859, he gained a hefty 15 Elo points. This propels from 2689 to 2704! Quite a breakthrough.

With a score of 8.0/11 Murtas Kazhgaleyev (left) and Max Illingworth finished equal second and
went home with a check of $2150 each

How he did it

The question which one may ask after seeing such a performance by the winner is: How did he make it possible? It is true that Ni Hua was by far the strongest player in the competition. Yet to simply knock out the competition in such fashion is not something that we see every day. I analysed all the games of Ni Hua in depth and came to following conclusions:

  1. His choice of openings was usually safe and he played the ones which he had analysed at home. In no game did he get a bad position from the opening.
  2. Tactical mistakes were simply absent from his play. Ni Hua would not choose the best continuation on many occasions but he never made any huge mistakes or blunders.
  3. Fighting it out right unto the end. He never agreed to premature draws. Even in his game against Rustam Khusnutdinov which ended in a draw he played it till he was forced to give a perpetual check. This fighting spirit and stamina were the main reasons why Ni Hua was so successful in the tournament.
  4. Luck! It is said that no player has ever won a tournament without good fortune. In the tournament Ni Hua had two bad positions. He was even ready to repeat the moves against Max Illingworth in the sixth round and in the tenth round Moulthun Ly had the window of opportunity to win the game for just one move. Both of them missed their chances and the Chinese player won both the games.

Let’s have a look at the three remaining games of Ni Hua in rounds seven, eight, and nine. (Report up to round six can be seen here)

Ni Hua vs James Morris (round seven)

[Event "Australian Open 2015"] [Site "Sydney AUS"] [Date "2015.01.07"] [Round "7.2"] [White "Ni, Hua"] [Black "Morris, James"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E06"] [WhiteElo "2689"] [BlackElo "2378"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "103"] [EventDate "2015.01.02"] 1. Nf3 e6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. c4 Be7 5. d4 O-O 6. Nc3 a6 7. O-O Nbd7 8. b3 c6 9. Qc2 b5 10. Rd1 b4 11. Na4 a5 12. Ne5 Bb7 13. e4 $1 Rc8 (13... Nxe4 $2 14. Bxe4 dxe4 15. Nxd7 Qxd7 16. Nb6 $16) (13... dxe4 14. Nxd7 Nxd7 15. Bxe4 $14) 14. Nxd7 Nxd7 15. c5 Ba6 16. a3 $1 {A very strong move that will leave black with a weak pawn. Either it will be the b4 pawn or the a5 pawn.} dxe4 17. Bxe4 f5 18. Bg2 bxa3 19. Rxa3 {The a5 pawn is weak and so are the pawns on e6 and c6. It's a lost position for Black.} Bb5 20. Nc3 Nf6 21. Nxb5 cxb5 22. Qe2 (22. Bb2 {Defending d4 was good.}) 22... Ne4 23. Bb2 (23. Bxe4 fxe4 24. Qxe4 Bxc5 25. Qxe6+ Kh8 $16 {White is better but some part of his advantage is lost. Of course Ni Hua doesn't want to go for premature simplifications.}) 23... b4 24. Raa1 Qd5 25. Qc2 Rfd8 26. Re1 Bf6 27. Rxa5 Bxd4 28. Bxd4 Qxd4 29. Bxe4 fxe4 30. Qxe4 Qc3 31. Qxe6+ {White is two pawns up and easily winning.} Kh8 32. Qe3 h6 33. Qxc3 bxc3 34. Rc1 Rd2 35. Rxc3 Rf8 36. c6 $6 (36. f4 $2 Re8 $1 $11) (36. Kg2 $1 {was the key move that was missed by Ni Hua.} Rfxf2+ 37. Kh3 h5 (37... Rxh2+ 38. Kg4) 38. Kh4 Rxh2+ 39. Kg5 $18) 36... Rfxf2 37. Rh5 Rg2+ 38. Kh1 Rge2 39. Rc1 Rc2 40. Rxc2 Rxc2 41. b4 Rxc6 {White's advantage has been reduced and Black has decent drawing chances now.} 42. Rc5 Rb6 43. b5 Kh7 $6 (43... Kg8 44. Kg2 Kf7 45. Kf3 Ke7 46. Ke4 Kd7 {was more tenacious.}) 44. Kg2 Rd6 45. Rc2 Rb6 46. Rc5 Rd6 47. Kf3 Rd2 48. Ke4 $1 {A bold decision but Ni Hua has calculated that his b-pawn is a winner.} Rxh2 49. Kd5 Rg2 50. b6 Rxg3 51. b7 Rd3+ (51... Rb3 52. Kc6 Rxb7 53. Kxb7 g5 54. Kc6 Kg6 55. Kd5 Kf5 56. Kd4+ Kf4 57. Rc6 h5 58. Rf6+ Kg3 59. Ke3 g4 60. Ke2 Kg2 61. Rh6 $18) 52. Kc4 {7.0/7! Not a bad start!} 1-0

Khusnutdinov vs Ni Hua (round eight)

[Event "Australian Open 2015"] [Site "Sydney AUS"] [Date "2015.01.08"] [Round "8.1"] [White "Khusnutdinov, Rustam"] [Black "Ni, Hua"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B12"] [WhiteElo "2476"] [BlackElo "2689"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2015.01.02"] {Nothing special happens in this game. Ni Hua equalises in the opening but never gets an advantage. Khusnutdinov does well to stop the Chinese GM from achieving the 100% score!} 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. h4 h6 5. g4 Bd7 6. Be3 e6 7. h5 $6 {This let's Black equalise quite easily.} Qb6 8. Nd2 c5 (8... Qxb2 {was also possible.}) 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. Bxc5 Qxc5 {I would already prefer Black's position.} 11. Ngf3 Ne7 12. Bd3 Bb5 (12... Qb4 $5 {Attacking b2 and g4 pawn.} 13. Rb1 Nbc6 $15 (13... Qxg4 14. Rh4 $18)) 13. Nb3 Qb6 14. Bxb5+ Qxb5 15. Nfd4 Qb6 16. Qe2 Nbc6 17. O-O-O a6 18. f4 Rc8 19. Kb1 Nxd4 20. Nxd4 Rc4 21. Qe3 Nc6 22. c3 Nxd4 23. Rxd4 O-O 24. Rhd1 Rfc8 25. Ka1 Rxd4 26. Rxd4 Qb5 27. Qf3 Rc4 28. Qd1 Rxd4 29. cxd4 {The position is just equal.} Qc4 30. f5 Qc8 31. Qb1 Qc4 32. Qd1 b5 33. Kb1 a5 34. b3 Qc3 35. fxe6 fxe6 36. Qc2 Qxd4 37. Qc8+ Kh7 38. Qxe6 Qd1+ 39. Kb2 Qd2+ 40. Kb1 Qd1+ {Finally Ni Hua was stopped and his score was now 7.5/8. Was he satisfied? Was he going to stop now? Maybe mere mortals would be happy with a clear first place but Ni Hua went a step further and scored 10.5/11!} 1/2-1/2

GM Rustam Khusnutdinov can be proud that he was the only man who could stop Ni Hua.
He was the only one who had any chances of catching the Chinese till round nine but a tenth
round loss to IM Bobby Cheng relegated him to fourth in the final standings.

[Event "Australian Open 2015"] [Site "Sydney AUS"] [Date "2015.01.09"] [Round "9.1"] [White "Ni, Hua"] [Black "Khamatgaleev, Alexej"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C72"] [WhiteElo "2689"] [BlackElo "2429"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2015.01.02"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 d6 5. O-O Bd7 6. c3 g6 7. d4 Bg7 8. Re1 Qe7 9. d5 Nb8 10. c4 Bxa4 11. Qxa4+ Nd7 12. Nc3 Ngf6 13. Qc2 a5 14. a3 O-O 15. Bd2 c6 16. Bg5 Rfc8 (16... h6 17. Bxf6 Nxf6 18. Rad1) 17. Nd2 Qf8 18. dxc6 bxc6 19. b4 d5 20. c5 Rcb8 $6 (20... d4 $1 21. Na4 Rcb8 $11) 21. exd5 Nxd5 (21... cxd5 22. Rab1 $16 {The two passers are very strong.}) 22. Nxd5 cxd5 23. c6 Rc8 24. b5 a4 {The two connected passers will win the game for White.} 25. f3 (25. Nc4 $3 {A very unusual tactic closing the c-file.} dxc4 26. cxd7 $18) 25... Nb6 (25... Qc5+ 26. Qxc5 Nxc5 {is not very clear.}) 26. Be3 d4 27. Bf2 Rab8 28. Qd3 Nd5 29. Ne4 Qd8 30. Rec1 Kh8 31. Qc4 Bh6 32. Re1 f5 33. Nc5 Nc3 34. Rxe5 Bg7 35. Ne6 Qg8 36. Bxd4 1-0

In an interview Ni Hua gave at the 2014 Asian Continental, the Chinese grandmaster was asked whether he had plans of retiring:

“I am becoming old already and this is time to think what to do further. In China players of my age don’t play chess. This is not a joke. This is a common problem not only for me, but also for Bu. For example, he is some years younger than me. We always discuss with my friends what we are going to do. Wang Yue for instance is already planning to start coaching. Wang Hao also has in mind to try himself as a trainer. So, when you are not young anymore, you really have to find another chess related activity, and this is coaching. Of course there are many young players and kids in China who like to know how to play chess. I hope if we decide once to change our profession, we will have a job. But frankly, coaching is boring.”

In April 2014 when the Asian Continental was held Ni Hua was doubtful about his chess career. He was rated 2654 back then. Since then he won the Capo d’Orso and Forni di Sopra tournaments in Italy, the Montcada Open in Spain, a member of the gold winning Chinese team at the 2014 Olympiad, a member of the Chinese team that beat Romania in the Romania-China match and finally this Australian Open victory. All these positive performances have taken him from 2654 to 2704 so perhaps the Chinese is now hopeful of improving his his career high rating of 2724 attained in April, 2009.

Final standings

Rk
SNo
Ti.
Name
Fed
Rtg
Pts
 TB 
1
1
GM
Ni Hua
CHN
2689
10.5
79.0
2
2
GM
Kazhgaleyev Murtas
KAZ
2573
8.0
79.5
3
6
IM
Illingworth Max
AUS
2476
8.0
78.5
4
7
GM
Khusnutdinov Rustam
KAZ
2476
7.5
81.5
5
17
IM
Morris James
AUS
2378
7.5
78.0
6
9
IM
Cheng Bobby
AUS
2436
7.5
77.0
7
8
IM
Ly Moulthun
AUS
2460
7.5
76.0
8
3
GM
Zhao Zong-Yuan
AUS
2564
7.5
75.5
9
5
GM
Papin Vasily
RUS
2513
7.5
75.5
10
4
GM
Smerdon David
AUS
2519
7.5
74.5
11
15
WGM
Ryjanova Julia
RUS
2413
7.5
71.0
12
19
IM
Bjelobrk Igor
AUS
2361
7.5
70.5
13
16
GM
Johansen Darryl K.
AUS
2404
7.0
73.0
14
11
IM
Khamatgaleev Alexej
RUS
2429
7.0
73.0
15
18
IM
Solomon Stephen J.
AUS
2372
7.0
71.5
16
14
IM
Jones Richard S.
WLS
2414
7.0
71.0
17
13
IM
Yap Kim Steven
PHI
2416
7.0
70.5
18
34
 
Loh Zachary
AUS
2076
7.0
68.5
19
26
IM
Brown Andrew
AUS
2276
7.0
68.5
20
25
 
De Paiva Pedro Henrique
BRA
2285
7.0
67.0

Pictorial impressions from Australia

Brazilian player Pedro Paiva, posing with the winner, broke 2300 in the tournament and will
now receive his FIDE Master title (photo from his Facebook page)

The best woman prize was won by Heather Richard who scored 6.0/11

WGM Julia Ryjanova from Russia scored 7.5/11 and finished eleventh in the main prize list

All smiling and energetic before the start of the game…

…Serious and focused once the game begins!

James Morris had a successful tournament. He not only finished fifth
in the Open, but also won the blitz tournament.

The Illingworths

Commentator for the tournament GM Ian Rogers with Russian GM Vasily Papin

Australia’s biggest talent, IM Anton Smirnov

Are you planning to come back to Australia in 2016?

The Australian Open which was the highest prize money event to be ever held in the country was a successful one. The 2016 edition will surely witness more grandmasters participating and if Ni Hua does plan to return he will surely have much stiffer competition!

All pictures by Cathy Rogers

The Chinese are winning just about everything. Clockwise from the top left: Olympic gold medal in 2014, Yu
Yangyi’s brilliant win at Qatar, Lu Shanglei and Wei Yi taking gold and silver at the World Juniors, Zhao Jun
winning Hastings 2014/15, Zhao Xue champion at New Zealand Open 2015, young Ding Liren is on fire at
Tata Steel A and Wei Yi is one of the favourites to win Tata Steel B!


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
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Niima Niima 1/15/2015 05:29
Thank you for the nice article.
lawrencexu lawrencexu 1/15/2015 04:56
the chinese rules the world!
1