The Origins of the Database with Frederic Friedel

by Arne Kaehler
10/2/2020 – Some might think that ChessBase was the inventor of the chess database. That is true to some degree, but there is a predecessor, and Frederic Friedel was a part of it. In the video we talk about one of the very first commercially available chess database systems, called "Intelligent Chess", and we opened our little ChessBase museum to present to you, the original prototype including a database on audio cassette.

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The origins of the chess database

Take a look at the video of Frederic Friedel, telling us about the interesting backstory of the "Intelligent Chess" computer.

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Arne Kaehler, a creative thinker who is passionate about board games in general was born in Hamburg and learned how to play chess at a very young age. Through teaching chess to youth teams and creating chess content on YouTube, Arne was able to extend this passion onto others and has even made an online chess course for anyone who wants to learn how to play this game. Currently, Arne blogs for the English news page of ChessBase and focuses on creating promotional and entertaining articles.
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mtm57 mtm57 10/3/2020 10:21
👍
kevinoconnell kevinoconnell 10/2/2020 10:14
Ah, those were the days! Intelligent Chess was based on Tolinka (by Barry Savage), which David Levy and I combined with a playing program (Mike Johnson). Some of the history is here: https://www.chessprogramming.org/Intelligent_Chess
TommyCB TommyCB 10/2/2020 09:04
Absolutely FANTASTIC video! (Says this old man born in the 1950s.)

By the way, the 6502 processor was the processor used on my first computer, the Apple II (and also the Apple II+).
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