Tbilisi Rd10: All drawn, Tomashevsky wins

by Alejandro Ramirez
2/26/2015 – The six draws seen today in Tbilisi do not alter the standings at all, meaning that Tomashevsky claims the Tbilisi Grand Prix with his one and a half point lead. His game against Andreikin was an interesting Noteboom, but it wasn't the only flashy game of the day. Both Dominguez and Kasimdzhanov should have scored, as they held winning positions against Mamedyarov and Jobava.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The third stage of the 2014-2015 FIDE Grand Prix is taking place in Tbilisi, Georgia. The tournament will run from February 14th to February 28, 2014. Some of the strongest players in the world will compete in a Round Robin event. The winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix series will earn their spot at the 2016 Candidate's Tournament.

Round Ten

Round 10 –February 26, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Svidler, Peter 2739
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716

Radjabov, Teimour ½-½ Giri, Anish
Radjabov was unable to get much from the opening. After repeating a long variation of the Petroff it seemed as if the Dutch player was better prepared, easily equalizing and keeping a draw in the Queen and Rook endgame.

Giri played the Petroff (also known as the Russian Defense),
an opening he was known for but didn't use last year at all

Dominguez, Leinier ½-½ Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar

Dominguez's tournament has been full wasted advantages. There are at least three instances where he held
a clear advantage but the game ended in a draw (today, vs. Svidler and vs. Jakovenko).

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE GP 2015"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.26"] [Round "10.3"] [White "Dominguez Perez, Leinier"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2726"] [BlackElo "2759"] [PlyCount "107"] [EventDate "2015.02.15"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. f3 {Dominguez usually prefers this move order over 6.Be3 to prevent 6...Ng4.} Qb6 $5 {One of the new options available for Black now that White played 6.f3. This leads to highly complex play as White has some problems developing along the darksquares, but the queen on b6 can become a target.} 7. g4 (7. Nb3 {is more common.}) 7... Nc6 8. Nb3 e6 9. Qe2 Qc7 10. Be3 b5 11. O-O-O Nd7 12. Qf2 Nce5 13. Rg1 {Dominguez is the first to deviate, not waiting to see what Mamedyarov had in store.} (13. Kb1 Be7 14. Rg1 g5 $5 {led to a complicated game in which the Cuban played annihilated the Azeri in Dominguez-Mamedyarov, Tromso Olympiad 2014.}) 13... Rb8 14. a3 $5 {This seems to invite b4, but that move is actually not possible. } Bb7 (14... b4 15. axb4 Rxb4 16. f4 Nc4 17. Rd4 $5 {and suddenly the pin on the 4th rank is very unpleasant!}) 15. f4 Nc4 16. Bxc4 bxc4 17. Nd2 Be7 18. g5 d5 19. f5 $5 {The Sicilian as it is supposed to be played. Both sides are trying to push their idea: Black has opened the b-file for his rook as well as trying to open lines for his bishops, meanwhile White is trying to punish Black's uncastled position.} dxe4 20. fxe6 fxe6 21. Rgf1 Rf8 22. Qh4 Bd5 23. Rxf8+ Nxf8 24. Bf4 $1 Bd6 25. Bxd6 Qxd6 26. Nxc4 Qc7 27. Nxe4 $1 {Tactically the knights are untouchable due to the fork on d6, so White emerges up a pawn. Not only that, he has some positional pluses, including play against the isolated e-pawn.} Kf7 28. Ned2 (28. Ncd6+ Kg8 29. Qg3 {was more incisive.}) 28... Kg8 29. Ne3 Rc8 30. Qg3 e5 31. Nb1 Be6 32. Nc3 Ng6 33. Ned5 Qf7 34. Qe3 Qf5 35. Ne4 Rf8 36. b3 Qg4 37. Ndc3 Nf4 38. Kb2 {White has taken a roundabout way of consolidating, but now he has blockaded the e-pawn and his king is in relative safety. Dominguez is on his way to win this game, or so it seems.} Bf5 39. Rd2 (39. Nd6 $1 Qxg5 40. Qxe5 $18) 39... Ne6 40. Nd6 Qxg5 41. Re2 $2 {This move is simply hard to explain.} (41. Nxf5 Qxf5 42. Qb6 {leads to winning advantage since after taking on a6 White will have three passed pawns.}) (41. Qxg5 Nxg5 42. Nd5 {was a stronger way of exchanging queens as now the knights control the board. Black will have trouble holding on to his pawns.}) 41... Qxe3 42. Rxe3 Nd4 {now there is counterplay against c2 and it is not trivial to win this position at all.} 43. Rxe5 $2 (43. Nce4 $14) 43... Bxc2 44. Rd5 Rf4 {perhaps Dominguez underestimated this move, but Black is now out of the dangerous waters.} 45. Nce4 Bxe4 46. Rxd4 Rf2+ 47. Kc3 Bg6 48. h4 Rf3+ 49. Kb4 Bc2 50. Rc4 {winning a bishop, but not the game.} Rxb3+ 51. Ka5 Rxa3+ 52. Kb6 Rb3+ 53. Ka7 g5 54. Rxc2 1/2-1/2

Svidler, Peter ½-½ Grischuk,Alexander
A very exciting Grunfeld. Grischuk sacrificed a piece, and Svidler saw nothing better than to accept this gift, which allowed Black to force a perpetual.

When Svidler plays a crazy Grunfeld, he usually is on the black side!

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE GP 2015"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.26"] [Round "10.2"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D85"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [BlackElo "2810"] [PlyCount "44"] [EventDate "2015.02.15"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. h3 O-O 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Nc6 11. Be3 f5 12. Bc4+ Kh8 13. O-O fxe4 (13... f4 14. Bd2 Nxd4 15. Bc3 {Ivanchuk-Navara, 2014.}) 14. Ng5 e5 15. dxe5 Nxe5 16. Bd5 h6 17. Nxe4 Bxh3 $1 18. gxh3 (18. Rb1 Qh4 19. Rxb7 Rad8 $1 20. Rxg7 $1 Kxg7 21. Qd4 {with very unclear play still.}) 18... Nf3+ 19. Kg2 (19. Kh1 Qd7 20. Kg2 Rad8 21. Bb3 Qc7 $1 {Threatens mate on h2 and the queen on d1!}) 19... Nh4+ 20. Kg1 (20. Kh1 Qd7 21. Qg4 Qxd5 22. Rad1 (22. Qxh4 Rae8 23. f3 Rxf3 $1 24. Rxf3 Rxe4 25. Qe1 Rf4 26. Bxf4 Qxf3+ 27. Kg1 Bd4+ 28. Be3 Bxe3+ 29. Kh2 $11) 22... Qh5 23. Qxh5 gxh5 $11) 20... Nf3+ 21. Kg2 Nh4+ 22. Kg1 Nf3+ 1/2-1/2

Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime ½-½ Jakovenko, Dmitry
Another anti-Berlin, and one in which Black was under considerable pressure. Despite the opposite colored bishops, the superior pawn structure gave MVL a definite pull. He even managed to win a pawn, but Jakovenko was able to get it back very soon and the game fizzled into a draw.

MVL could have put just a bit more pressure today

Kasimdzhanov, Rustam ½-½ Jobava, Baadur
Kasimdzhanov must be kicking himself for not winning this one, though to be fair Jobava must be kicking himself for accepting a draw in the final position!

Only Jobava would play this Slav variation in a Grand Prix

The Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs of Georgia, Levan Kipiani, made the opening move

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE GP 2015"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.26"] [Round "10.5"] [White "Kasimdzhanov, Rustam"] [Black "Jobava, Baadur"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D16"] [WhiteElo "2705"] [BlackElo "2696"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2015.02.15"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nf3 dxc4 5. a4 Bg4 {A variation that is supposed to be bad for Black. This game does not change that evaluation.} 6. Ne5 Bh5 7. f3 Nfd7 8. Nxc4 e5 9. g3 Bb4 10. dxe5 O-O 11. Bh3 Qe7 12. f4 f6 13. e6 Nc5 14. f5 Nba6 15. O-O Rfd8 16. Qc2 Rd4 17. Rf4 Rad8 18. Be3 Rxf4 19. Bxf4 Bxc3 20. bxc3 Nxe6 21. fxe6 Qc5+ 22. Ne3 g5 23. Kf2 $1 gxf4 24. gxf4 Nc7 25. Rg1+ Kh8 26. c4 (26. Qe4 $1) 26... Rd4 27. Qf5 $1 Qxf5 28. Nxf5 Rxc4 $2 (28... Rxf4+ 29. Ke3 Nxe6 30. Ng7 $16) 29. Nh6 $4 (29. Ne7 h6 (29... Bg6 30. f5 $18) 30. Rg8+ Kh7 31. Bf5+) 29... Rxf4+ 30. Ke1 Bg6 31. Nf7+ Kg7 32. Nd6 Rxa4 33. Kf2 {Even though the position looks dangerous because of the passed pawn on the e-file, Black can esaily deal with it and keep his extra material.} (33. Kf2 Rf4+ $1 {An important check as the king is worse no matter where it goes.} 34. Kg2 (34. Kg3 Rb4 35. e7 f5 $1 {preparing Kf6.} 36. Bxf5 Bxf5 37. Nxf5+ Kf6 $19) (34. Ke3 Nd5+ 35. Kd2 Kf8 $19) (34. Ke1 Rb4 35. e7 Rb1+ 36. Kf2 Rxg1 37. Kxg1 a5 $19 {the e-pawn is of no importance as even winning a piece leaves White in a lost position.} 38. Bd7 a4 39. e8=Q Bxe8 40. Bxe8 a3 $19) 34... Rb4 {Protecting the b-pawn with tempo if the king goes back to f2.} 35. e7 Nd5 36. e8=Q Bxe8 37. Nxe8+ Kf8 38. Nd6 Nf4+ $19 39. Kg3 Nxe2+) 1/2-1/2

Andreikin, Dmitry ½-½ Tomashevsky, Evgeny
Probably only needing a draw to secure first place, Tomashevsky chose to put his trust on his pet Noteboom, though it is far from a drawish line. The game was very complex, and as most Notebooms, very difficult to understand. White's pair of bishops and massive pawn center was somehow unable to break through and Black's powerful passed pawns on the queenside always proved to be dangerous. Andreikin even won a piece at a point, for two pawns, but was unable to make progress regardless.

"The Noteboom? No way!" But Tomashevsky was faithful to his guns.

It's over: the draw is sealed by perpetual check and Tomashevsky claims the Tbilisi GP

He can be pretty content. 29 rating points puts him at number 18 in the live rating list!

Standings

Round Ten Games

Select from the dropdown menu to replay the games

Photos from the official website by Maria Emelianova

Schedule

Round 01 – February 15, 2015 - 15:00
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Svidler, Peter 2739
0-1
Giri, Anish 2797
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Round 02 –February 16, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
½-½
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
0-1
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Giri, Anish 2797
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2739
Round 03 –February 17, 2015 - 15:00
Svidler, Peter 2739
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Jobava, Baadur 2696
0-1
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Round 04 –February 18, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
1-0
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
0-1
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Giri, Anish 2797
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Svidler, Peter 2739
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Round 05 –February 20, 2015 - 15:00
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
1-0
Svidler, Peter 2739
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
0-1
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Jobava, Baadur 2696
1-0
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Round 06 –February 21, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Giri, Anish 2797
½-½
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Svidler, Peter 2739
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Round 07 –February 22, 2015 - 15:00
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2739
Jobava, Baadur 2696
1-0
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
1-0
Giri, Anish 2797
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Round 08 –February 23, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
½-½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Giri, Anish 2797
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Svidler, Peter 2739
0-1
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Round 09 –February 25, 2015 - 15:00
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Jobava, Baadur 2696
0-1
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2739
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
½-½
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Round 10 –February 26, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Svidler, Peter 2739
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Round 11 –February 27, 2015 - 13:00
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Svidler, Peter 2739
Giri, Anish 2797   Dominguez, Leinier 2726

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 13 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register