Tata Steel Rd10: Relative peace from The Hague

by Alejandro Ramirez
1/21/2015 – Even though there were three decisive results in the top section of Tata Steel, it felt that the round was both short and not as exciting as the previous ones - though to be fair it has been a fantastic event so far. The day favored Loek Van Wely, who got his first victory, as well as Anish Giri and Fabiano Caruana who inch closer to the top places.

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The Tata Steel Chess Tournament has two main tournaments. They are played according to the 'round robin' system, whereby each competitor plays in turn against every other during the tournament. The Tata Steel Masters has 14 participants and the Tata Steel Challengers has 14 participants. Both groups start on January 10th 2015 and the last round is on January 25th. All rounds in Wijk aan Zee begin at 13.30 hours, except for the last round on January 25th, which begins at 12.00 hours. The time control is 100 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 50 minutes for 20 moves, then 15 minutes for the remaining moves with 30 seconds cumulative increment for each move starting from the first move.

Admission to the playing hall in Wijk aan Zee, Rotterdam and The Hague is free of charge

Round ten - Masters

Round 10 - Wednesday Jan. 21
Van Wely, L. - Hou, Y.
1-0
Jobava, B. - Caruana, F.
0-1
Radjabov, T. - Aronian, L.
½-½
Ivanchuk, V. - Carlsen, M.
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave - Wojtaszek
½-½
Ding, L. - So, W.
½-½
Saric, I. - Giri, A.
0-1

Daniel King shows the game Jobava vs Caruana

Today the round was played in The Hague.

At the famous Binnenhof, the governmental center of The Netherlands.

The players were given a private art tour. Here they have the chance to admire
Johannes Vermeer's 17th-century painting Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Well, why not?

All of the players posing in front of Paulus Potter's The Bull

This masterpiece is an oil painting and dates back to 1647

Anish Giri, maybe slightly overwhelmed

Hou Yifan during the art tour

Van Wely, Loek 1-0 Hou Yifan
A disaster for the World Women's Champion. She obtained a reasonable position from the opening, but it spiraled out of control quickly:

[Event "77th Tata Steel GpA"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2015.01.21"] [Round "10"] [White "Van Wely, L."] [Black "Hou Yifan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2667"] [BlackElo "2673"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "r1b2rk1/p2pp1bp/2p3p1/2P1p1B1/4N2Q/8/Pq3PPP/R3R1K1 w - - 0 17"] [PlyCount "15"] [EventDate "2015.01.09"] 17. Rad1 {This is a hard position to evaluate. Black is up two pawns but her position lacks development. Her bishop on c8 is specially bad. She tries to rip apart the position immediately, but it was probably better to have some patience.} d5 $6 {Too hasty.} (17... Qxa2 18. Bxe7 Rf4 19. Qg3 a5 $5 {The position remains unclear. Black could even consider sacrificing the exchange on e4.}) 18. cxd6 exd6 19. Rxd6 {The strange thing about Hou Yifan's decision is that her king position is now clearly bad, whereas before d5 it wasn't that bad.} Bf5 20. Nf6+ Bxf6 21. Bxf6 Rab8 $4 {This, however, is just a blunder.} ( 21... Qxa2 22. h3 Rf7 (22... a5 {and initiating counterplay might be a touch better.}) 23. Bxe5 {looks painful for Black, as she will have to be careful about the diagonal for the rest of the game, but she might somehow survive.}) 22. Qc4+ Rf7 23. Red1 {Simple, Black cannot avoid Rd8+} Qb1 (23... Rbf8 24. Rd8 { doesn't change anything as Rxf8 and Rd8 mate is coming.}) 24. h3 1-0

Ivanchuk, Vassily ½-½ Carlsen, Magnus
The Ragozin employed by Carlsen gave him easy equality. Ivanchuk repeated moves in a position where he already had nothing.

Ding Liren ½-½ So, Wesley
This was seemingly a very exciting game, but it was all prep. The players followed the old game Anatoli Vaisser - Efim Geller from the Sochi Chigorin Memorial back in 1982. Actually this game in Wijk aan Zee even finished a couple of moves before the Vaisser-Geller one.

Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime ½-½ Wojtaszek, Radoslaw
This game actually promised to be very exciting. White castled queenside and sacrificed two pawns to keep his opponent's king in the center! Unfortunately he was forced to cash in his initiative soon after that. The resulting opposite colored bishop endgame was very clearly heading towards a draw.

Saric, Ivan 0-1 Giri, Anish

[Event "77th Tata Steel Chess Masters"] [Site "Den Haag"] [Date "2015.01.21"] [Round "10"] [White "Saric, Ivan"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B48"] [WhiteElo "2666"] [BlackElo "2784"] [Annotator "Friedel, Josh"] [PlyCount "94"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "NED"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Qf3 {This move looks a bit unnatural, but the idea is straightforward. White wants to 0-0-0 next move, and Qg3 is often an annoying move for Black to deal with.} Ne5 (7... Nf6 {is the most common way to play, but Giri remains loyal to Ne5, which he's played a few times now.}) 8. Qg3 h5 {The queen on g3 is extremely annoying, so Black harasses it in the traditional manner.} 9. f4 ({Radjabov played} 9. O-O-O {against Giri in round 6.}) (9. f3 {was played successfully by Karjakin against Giri in 2014. One can safely assume that Anish has a few improvements.}) 9... h4 10. Qh3 Nc4 11. Bxc4 Qxc4 12. O-O-O b5 {So far, the game has proceeded in typical Paulsen fashion: White has developed and castled, and Black has moved a bunch of pawns.} 13. f5 {Saric's novelty, intentional or otherwise.} (13. Kb1 {was played against GM Bok earlier this year.}) 13... Bb7 14. Rhf1 {There is some potential scaryness on the f-file, so Giri shuts that down.} e5 15. Nb3 Qc7 16. Bg5 {A very nice move, disturbing Black's development.} Rc8 17. Rf2 {White frees the c3 knight while preparing to double on the d-file. Unfortunately, this also gives Black time to solidify his position.} (17. f6 $5 {It is possible to start throwing punches right away.} Nxf6 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Rxf6 b4 {Forced, as otherwise Black's position is just in shambles.} 20. Rxf7 bxc3 21. Rfxd7 (21. Rdxd7 {is also an option.}) 21... cxb2+ 22. Kxb2 Qxc2+ 23. Ka1 {looks promising for White, but after the accurate } Rh6 $1 {White's initiative seems to have fizzled out, and a draw is likely.}) 17... Be7 18. Bxe7 Kxe7 {This looks risky, but it isn't so easy to take advantage of the king on e7 right away. The knight is also far better on f6 than e7.} (18... Nxe7 19. Rfd2 {and Black's position is very uncomfortable to say the least.}) 19. Rfd2 Nf6 20. a3 Rh6 {This is what developing the rook in the Paulsen looks like. Black also prepares to drag his king to safety, as it surely doesn't want to remain on e7 forever.} 21. Qe3 Kf8 22. Kb1 {White can't do much, so Saric makes simple improvements to his position. The position looks very level, as improvements for both sides are hard to come by. That doesn't mean it is drawish, however.} Kg8 23. Rg1 {Seeing that nothing can be accomplished on the d-file, Saric aims his sniper rifle at a new target. Unfortunately, I think this is the start of his problems.} (23. Qe2 {keeping the status quo looks safer, but it is hard to play moves like this.}) 23... Ng4 24. Qf3 {h2 is always poisoned, since Qh3 traps the knight.} Qb6 25. Re1 Nf6 { Those pesky 2780 players, disrupting people's aim.} 26. g4 {Saric decides to play on the kingside anyway, but it looks to me as if Black's play is faster.} hxg3 27. Qxg3 (27. hxg3 b4 28. axb4 Qxb4 29. g4 Rh4 $1 {and Black is the one with the initiative.}) 27... d6 28. Rg2 Rh7 29. Qg5 Kf8 {This is where White's play ends, and he's left to deal with his weaknesses.} 30. Qd2 Rxc3 $1 {Black doesn't miss a chance to play energetically.} 31. Qxc3 Nxe4 32. Qd3 $2 {The first clear error of the game. White had to play precisely to create counterplay.} (32. Qb4 Nc3+ 33. bxc3 {The doubled pawns actually make a snug home for White's king on b2.} Bxg2 34. Rxe5 Rxh2 35. Re2 $1 {and it isn't so easy for Black to prove anything, for instance} Rh1+ 36. Kb2 Qg1 (36... Bd5 { is better.}) 37. Qxd6+ Kg8 38. a4 $1 {and Black's mating threats dissipate.}) 32... Nc3+ 33. Qxc3 Bxg2 {with the e5 pawn remaining intact, Black's advantage is decisive.} 34. Qc8+ Ke7 35. Qg8 Qf2 $1 36. Rd1 (36. Rxe5+ dxe5 37. Qxh7 Kf6 $1 {is also bad for White.}) 36... Be4 37. Rd2 Qg1+ 38. Ka2 Bxf5 {After a very precise sequence, Giri is left up two pawns. Of course, I'd still be nervous about my drafty king on e7, but thankfully it is Giri's king and he's got it covered.} 39. Qb8 Rh6 40. Rd5 Bd7 41. Qb7 Qg4 {Not obvious, but all precise. White simply can't generate any threats.} 42. Na5 Kf6 {This nifty move ensures complete safety for Black's king.} 43. b3 Rxh2 44. Rxd6+ Be6 45. Kb2 {Now it isn't about precision as much as making sure nothing gets blundered.} Qf4 46. Nc6 Rh1 47. Qe7+ Kf5 {and Saric resigns just as Giri's king completed his walk. As messy as it looked, this was a very clean game by Giri who took advantage of just a couple of errors by his opponent.} 0-1

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008.

He has participated in six US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

 

Giri felt pretty confident!

Jobava, Baadur 0-1 Caruana, Fabiano
Jobava played his usual, creative chess. However it, again, landed him in trouble. He was more or less able to clear himself from his nightmarish position until disaster struck:

[Event "77th Tata Steel GpA"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2015.01.21"] [Round "10"] [White "Jobava, Ba"] [Black "Caruana, F."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A45"] [WhiteElo "2727"] [BlackElo "2820"] [PlyCount "108"] [EventDate "2015.01.09"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Bf4 e6 4. e3 Bb4 5. Nge2 O-O 6. a3 Bd6 7. g3 b6 8. Bg2 Bb7 9. O-O c5 10. Re1 Be7 11. h3 Nc6 12. g4 Rc8 13. Qd2 a6 14. dxc5 bxc5 15. Rad1 Qa5 16. Nc1 c4 17. N1e2 Rfd8 18. Nd4 Qb6 19. Qc1 Nd7 20. g5 Bf8 21. h4 g6 22. h5 Bg7 23. hxg6 hxg6 24. Nf3 Nc5 25. Nh2 e5 26. Bg3 Ne7 27. Ng4 e4 28. f4 Nf5 29. Bf2 Rb8 30. Rd2 Qe6 31. Bh3 Qc6 32. Bg2 Qe6 33. Red1 Nh4 34. Bh3 Nf3+ 35. Kg2 Qd6 36. Rxd5 Bxd5 37. Rxd5 Qb6 38. Rxc5 Qxc5 39. Nxe4 Qc6 40. Nef6+ Bxf6 41. Nxf6+ Kg7 42. e4 Nd2 43. Bg4 c3 44. b4 Rd6 45. Qe1 Rbd8 46. Qh1 {As strange a position as it gets. Black is up two exchanges (!) but White has two pawns and he is currently threatening checkmate on h6.} Rxf6 (46... Rh8 $1 47. Qe1 Qc4 48. Bc5 Rdd8 {keeps the material, and although White retains compensation it is unclear if it is enough.}) 47. Qh6+ Kg8 48. gxf6 Qxf6 49. Bh4 Qd4 50. Bxd8 {White recovers all of his material.} Qxe4+ 51. Kg3 $4 {An absolute blunder... and White still had plenty of time to calculate!} ( 51. Kf2 Qd4+ 52. Ke2 $1 (52. Kg2 Qxd8 53. Be6 Qa8+ 54. Kh2 Qe4 {is bad for White.}) 52... Qxd8 53. Be6 $1 {is fine for White. If the bishop is taken a perpetual follows, if it isn't, the bishop can retreat to d5 and put pressure on f7.} (53. Qh3 {is worse for White, but still would make Black work for it.}) 53... Qf6 54. Bd5 $11) 51... Qe1+ {Now White is simply getting mated.} 52. Kg2 Qf1+ 53. Kh2 (53. Kg3 Ne4+ 54. Kh2 Qf2+ 55. Kh3 Qg3#) 53... Qf2+ 54. Kh1 Nf1 { There is no way to avoid Ng3+ except with Bh4, but that allows Qh2#. oops.} 0-1

Radjabov, Teimour ½-½ Aronian, Levon
Amazingly, the game's novelty came in move 32. The stem game was Polgar-Aronian, back in 2008. That game ended in a draw and Radjabov's improvement does not cause a real impression on the evaluation of the position, which is that White is a tiny bit better but will very likely end in a draw.

A high rated game analysis

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Masters standings after ten rounds

Round ten - Challengers

Round 10 - Wednesday Jan. 21
Wei, Y. - l' Ami, E.
1-0
Haast, A. - Klein, D.
½-½
Shankland, S. - Sevian, S.
½-½
Dale, A. - Gunina, V.
½-½
Navara, D. - Potkin, V.
½-½
Timman, J. - Saleh, S.
0-1
Van Kampen, R. - Michiels, B.
1-0

An important day as Wei Yi was able to once again catch David Navara at the top of the leaderboard. Erwin l'Ami bravely sacrficied a piece against the Chinese prodigy, but it never provided enough compensation.

Ari Dale held on to a completely lost position against Valentina Gunina when the Russian player made her kingside situation much more complicated than it should have been.

Salem scored a win that he absolutely needed against Timman, who continues having a tough time in the tournament.

Last and certainly least Anne Haast and David Klein played for 133 moves, 50+ that could probably have been spared and 17 that definitely should have been spared.

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Challengers standings after ten rounds

Photos by Alina l'Ami for the official website

Schedule and results - Masters group

Round 1 - Saturday Jan. 10
Radjabov, T. - Van Wely, L.
½-½
Ivanchuk, V. - Jobava, B.
1-0
Vachier-Lagrave - Hou, Y.
1-0
Ding, L. - Caruana, F.
0-1
Saric, I. - Aronian, L.
½-½
Giri, A. - Carlsen, M.
½-½
So, W. - Wojtaszek, R.
½-½
Round 2 - Sunday Jan. 11
Van Wely, L. - Wojtaszek, R.
½-½
Carlsen, M. - So, W.
½-½
Aronian, L. - Giri, A.
½-½
Caruana, F. - Saric, I.
1-0
Hou, Y. - Ding, L.
0-1
Jobava, B. - Vachier-Lagrave
½-½
Radjabov, T. - Ivanchuk, V.
½-½
Round 3 - Monday Jan. 12
Ivanchuk, V. - Van Wely, L.
1-0
Vachier-Lagrave - Radjabov, T.
½-½
Ding, L. - Jobava, B.
1-0
Saric, I. - Hou, Y.
½-½
Giri, A. - Caruana, F.
½-½
So, W. - Aronian, L.
1-0
Wojtaszek, R. - Carlsen, M.
1-0
Round 4 - Tuesday Jan. 13
Van Wely, L. - Carlsen, M.
0-1
Aronian, L. - Wojtaszek, R.
½-½
Caruana, F. - So, W.
½-½
Hou, Y. - Giri, A.
½-½
Jobava, B. - Saric, I.
0-1
Radjabov, T. - Ding, L.
0-1
Ivanchuk, V. - Vachier-Lagrave
1-0
Round 5 - Thursday Jan. 15
Vachier-Lagrave - Van Wely, L.
½-½
Ding, L. - Ivanchuk, V.
½-½
Saric, I. - Radjabov, T.
0-1
Giri, A. - Jobava, B.
1-0
So, W. - Hou, Y.
½-½
Wojtaszek, R. - Caruana, F.
1-0
Carlsen, M. - Aronian, L.
1-0
Round 6 - Friday Jan. 16
Van Wely, L. - Aronian, L.
½-½
Caruana, F. - Carlsen, M.
0-1
Hou, Y. - Wojtaszek, R.
½-½
Jobava, B. - So, W.
0-1
Radjabov, T. - Giri, A.
½-½
Ivanchuk, V. - Saric, I.
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave - Ding, L.
1-0
Round 7 - Saturday Jan. 17
Ding, L. - Van Wely, L.
1-0
Saric, I. - Vachier-Lagrave
0-1
Giri, A. - Ivanchuk, V.
½-½
So, W. - Radjabov, T.
½-½
Wojtaszek, R. - Jobava, B.
0-1
Carlsen, M. - Hou, Y.
1-0
Aronian, L. - Caruana, F.
½-½
Round 8 - Sunday Jan. 18
Van Wely, L. - Caruana, F.
0-1
Hou, Y. - Aronian, L.
½-½
Jobava, B. - Carlsen, M.
0-1
Radjabov, T. - Wojtaszek, R.
1-0
Ivanchuk, V. - So, W.
0-1
Vachier-Lagrave - Giri, A.
1-0
Ding, L. - Saric, I.
1-0
Round 9 - Tuesday Jan. 20
Saric, I. - Van Wely, L.
½-½
Giri, A. - Ding, L.
1-0
So, W. - Vachier-Lagrave
½-½
Wojtaszek, R. - Ivanchuk, V.
½-½
Carlsen, M. - Radjabov, T.
1-0
Aronian, L. - Jobava, B.
1-0
Caruana, F. - Hou, Y.
½-½
Round 10 - Wednesday Jan. 21
Van Wely, L. - Hou, Y.
1-0
Jobava, B. - Caruana, F.
0-1
Radjabov, T. - Aronian, L.
½-½
Ivanchuk, V. - Carlsen, M.
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave - Wojtaszek
½-½
Ding, L. - So, W.
½-½
Saric, I. - Giri, A.
0-1
Round 11 - Friday Jan. 23
Giri, A. - Van Wely, L.  
So, W. - Saric, I.  
Wojtaszek, R. - Ding, L.  
Carlsen, M. - Vachier-Lagrave  
Aronian, L. - Ivanchuk, V.  
Caruana, F. - Radjabov, T.  
Hou, Y. - Jobava, B.  
Round 12 - Saturday Jan. 24
Van Wely, L. - Jobava, B.  
Radjabov, T. - Hou, Y.  
Ivanchuk, V. - Caruana, F.  
Vachier-Lagrave - Aronian, L.  
Ding, L. - Carlsen, M.  
Saric, I. - Wojtaszek, R.  
Giri, A. - So, W.  
Round 13 - Sunday Jan. 25
So, W. - Van Wely, L.  
Wojtaszek, R. - Giri, A.  
Carlsen, M. - Saric, I.  
Aronian, L. - Ding, L.  
Caruana, F. - Vachier-Lagrave  
Hou, Y. - Ivanchuk, V.  
Jobava, B. - Radjabov, T.  

Schedule and results - Challengers group

Round 1 - Saturday Jan. 10
Shankland, S. - Wei, Y.
½-½
Dale, A. - Haast, A.
½-½
Navara, D. - l' Ami, E.
½-½
Timman, J. - Klein, D.
½-½
Van Kampen, R. - Sevian, S.
1-0
Michiels, B. - Gunina, V.
½-½
Saleh, S. - Potkin, V.
½-½
Round 2 - Sunday Jan. 11
Wei, Y. - Potkin, V.
1-0
Gunina, V. - Saleh, S.
1-0
Sevian, S. - Michiels, B.
0-1
Klein, D. - Van Kampen, R.
½-½
l' Ami, E. - Timman, J.
½-½
Haast, A. - Navara, D.
0-1
Shankland, S. - Dale, A.
½-½
Round 3 - Monday Jan. 12
Dale, A. - Wei, Y.
½-½
Navara, D. - Shankland, S.
½-½
Timman, J. - Haast, A.
0-1
Van Kampen, R. - l' Ami, E.
½-½
Michiels, B. - Klein, D.
0-1
Saleh, S. - Sevian, S.
½-½
Potkin, V. - Gunina, V.
1-0
Round 4 - Tuesday Jan. 13
Wei, Y. - Gunina, V.
1-0
Sevian, S. - Potkin, V.
1-0
Klein, D. - Saleh, S.
0-1
l' Ami, E. - Michiels, B.
1-0
Haast, A. - Van Kampen, R.
0-1
Shankland, S. - Timman, J.
½-½
Dale, A. - Navara, D.
0-1
Round 5 - Thursday Jan. 15
Navara, D. - Wei, Y.
½-½
Timman, J. - Dale, A.
1-0
Van Kampen - Shankland, S.
0-1
Michiels, B. - Haast, A.
1-0
Saleh, S. - l' Ami, E.
0-1
Potkin, V. - Klein, D.
1-0
Gunina, V. - Sevian, S.
0-1
Round 6 - Friday Jan. 16
Wei, Y. - Sevian, S.
1-0
Klein, D. - Gunina, V.
1-0
l' Ami, E. - Potkin, V.
½-½
Haast, A. - Saleh, S.
½-½
Shankland, S. - Michiels, B.
1-0
Dale, A. - Van Kampen, R.
0-1
Navara, D. - Timman, J.
1-0
Round 7 - Saturday Jan. 17
Timman, J. - Wei, Y.
0-1
Van Kampen, R. - Navara, D.
0-1
Michiels, B. - Dale, A.
1-0
Saleh, S. - Shankland, S.
½-½
Potkin, V. - Haast, A.
1-0
Gunina, V. - l' Ami, E.
1-0
Sevian, S. - Klein, D.
1-0
Round 8 - Sunday Jan. 18
Wei, Y. - Klein, D.
1-0
l' Ami, E. - Sevian, S.
½-½
Haast, A. - Gunina, V.
1-0
Shankland, S. - Potkin, V.
½-½
Dale, A. - Saleh, S.
0-1
Navara, D. - Michiels, B.
1-0
Timman, J. - Van Kampen, R.
0-1
Round 9 - Tuesday Jan. 20
Van Kampen, R. - Wei, Y.
½-½
Michiels, B. - Timman, J.
½-½
Saleh, S. - Navara, D.
0-1
Potkin, V. - Dale, A.
½-½
Gunina, V. - Shankland, S.
½-½
Sevian, S. - Haast, A.
1-0
Klein, D. - l' Ami, E.
½-½
Round 10 - Wednesday Jan. 21
Wei, Y. - l' Ami, E.
1-0
Haast, A. - Klein, D.
½-½
Shankland, S. - Sevian, S.
½-½
Dale, A. - Gunina, V.
½-½
Navara, D. - Potkin, V.
½-½
Timman, J. - Saleh, S.
0-1
Van Kampen, R. - Michiels, B.
1-0
Round 11 - Friday Jan. 23
Michiels, B. - Wei, Y.  
Saleh, S. - Van Kampen, R.  
Potkin, V. - Timman, J.  
Gunina, V. - Navara, D.  
Sevian, S. - Dale, A.  
Klein, D. - Shankland, S.  
l' Ami, E. - Haast, A.  
Round 12 - Saturday Jan. 24
Wei, Y. - Haast, A.  
Shankland, S. - l' Ami, E.  
Dale, A. - Klein, D.  
Navara, D. - Sevian, S.  
Timman, J. - Gunina, V.  
Van Kampen, R. - Potkin, V.  
Michiels, B. - Saleh, S.  
Round 13 - Sunday Jan. 25
Saleh, S. - Wei, Y.  
Potkin, V. - Michiels, B.  
Gunina, V. - Van Kampen, R.  
Sevian, S. - Timman, J.  
Klein, D. - Navara, D.  
l' Ami, E. - Dale, A.  
Haast, A. - Shankland, S.  

Venues

The tournament has a slight change this year. Most of the rounds will be played in the traditional De Moriaan Community Centre in Wijk aan Zee, but two of the rounds will be played elsewhere. Last year the tournament traveled to the National Museum in Amsterdam and the High Tech Campus in Eindhoven.

This year the fifth round will be held in De Rotterdam. De Rotterdam is a building on the Wilhelminapier in Rotterdam, designed by Rem Koolhaas in 1998.

Rotterdam is ready to host Tata Steel!

The tenth round will be played in the International Press Cnetre Niewuspoort in the Hague. Councillor Karsten Klein of The Hague had this to say: "The Hague is honored to be able to host the Tata Steel Chess Tournament 2015 at the heart of the Dutch parliamentary democracy. Our city has a long history of international chess tournaments, a tradition which is continued in this manner. "

Commentary on Playchess

This being the first major event of the year, it is clear that we will be bringing you live commentary on our server www.playchess.com!

Day Date Round English
Sunday January 18 Round 8 GM Simon Williams
Monday January 19 Free  
Tuesday January 20 Round 9 GM Daniel King
Wednesday January 21 Round 10 GM Simon Williams
Thursday January 22 Free  
Friday January 23 Round 11 GM Daniel King 
Saturday January 24 Round 12 GM Simon Williams
Sunday January 25 Round 13 GM Daniel King

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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bronkenstein bronkenstein 1/22/2015 12:07
Speaking of Van Wely - Hou, GM Alex Colovic´s comment reveals some psychological background:

˝Van Wely beat Hou Yifan by playing 1 e4, a move he normally never plays. The game was very interesting - they followed the recent game Naiditsch-Sutovsky until move 16, when instead of the best move (according to comps) and the one chosen by Naiditsch, van Wely played 16 c5. This was cunning: first, Hou never expected 1 e4 and this line; second, Hou played 3...g6 and 4...bc6 in December and won, so van Wely could prepare with a degree of certainty that Hou would repeat the line; third, she must have had some vague recollection of the Naiditsch-Sutovsky game and used it to navigate the complications; fourth, playing by analogy can be very dangerous in tactical positions. And that is what happened, Hou copied Sutovsky's recipe, but it didn't work due to tactical reasons. A very good psychological preparation by van Wely!˝
Wastrel Wastrel 1/22/2015 02:48
24 h3 is a "quiet" winning move in Van Wely-Hou Yifan. It shows some class not to take the queen, and it reminds me of Nimzovich's famous Zugzwang game, in which the winning move was the same move. I wonder if Van Wely thought of that as he made it.
dhochee dhochee 1/22/2015 01:34
The "Replay Master Games" section is showing games from round 9. Can you fix it please?
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