Tashir 05: Grischuk, Gelfand win

by Alejandro Ramirez
11/9/2014 – Grischuk's spectacular run in Moscow is far from over. He played an unusual and aggressive system against Leko's Orthodox Queen's Gambit, and after a tense struggle he ended up winning yet another game. Gelfand finally found the key to victory against a Morozevich who is clearly out of shape. Grischuk only needs a draw tomorrow to clinch at least a tie for first place.

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The International tournament Tashir memory Tigran Petrosian is being held in Moscow from November 3rd to November 11th. The format of the event is a seven-round Round Robin. The time control: 100 minutes for 40 moves + 50 minutes for 20 moves + 15 minutes to the end of the game with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from the first.

Round Five

Round 05 – November 09
Aronian, Levon 2797
½-½ 
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
Grischuk, Alexander 2795
1-0
Leko, Peter 2731
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
½-½ 
Ding Liren 2730
Gelfand, Boris 2759
1-0
Morozevich, Alexander 2724

Aronian, Levon ½-½ Kramnik, Vladimir
A solid set-up by Kramnik allowed him to obtain a relatively effortless draw.

[Event "Petrosian Memorial 2014"] [Site "Moscow RUS"] [Date "2014.11.09"] [Round "5"] [White "Aronian, L."] [Black "Kramnik, V."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2797"] [BlackElo "2760"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2014.11.03"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 Nh5 8. Bd3 Nxf4 9. exf4 b6 10. b4 a5 11. a3 c6 12. O-O Ba6 13. Na4 Bf6 14. Ne5 Bxe5 15. fxe5 Bxd3 16. Qxd3 axb4 17. axb4 bxc5 18. Nxc5 Nxc5 19. bxc5 Rxa1 20. Rxa1 f6 21. Qe3 fxe5 22. Qxe5 Qf6 {Blacks' c6 pawn can be attacked and his e6 pawn is weak, but that's all White has going for him. Passive defense is sufficient to hold this position.} 23. Qe3 Re8 24. Re1 Rb8 25. g3 Kf7 26. Qa3 Kg8 27. Re5 h6 28. Qe3 Rb1+ 29. Kg2 Rb2 30. h4 Kf7 31. h5 Kg8 32. Kg1 Rb1+ 33. Kh2 Rb2 34. Kg2 Ra2 35. Qe1 Rb2 36. Kg1 Kh7 37. Rxe6 Qf5 38. Qe3 Rxf2 39. Rxh6+ gxh6 40. Qxf2 Qxh5 41. Qe1 1/2-1/2

Both Kramnik and Aronian will play tournament leader Grischuk in the last two rounds

Grischuk, Alexaner 1-0 Leko, Peter
A wild game that spawned complications as early as move eight. Leko lost his way at some point and allowed Gricshuk to go into a favorable endgame, after which the Hungarian severely underestimated the danger to his king!

[Event "Petrosian Memorial 2014"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.09"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Grischuk, A."]
[Black "Leko, P."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D58"]
[WhiteElo "2795"]
[BlackElo "2731"]
[PlyCount "65"]
[EventDate "2014.11.03"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 e6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. e3 b6 (7... Ne4
{known as the Lasker variation, has been gaining steady popularity.}) 8. g4 $5
{White has tried everything under the sun in this position, but g4 is a very
new idea! It has scored well so far, and Black players of this variation will
have to figure out how to diffuse it.} Nxg4 {Accepting the pawn on g4 loses
the pawn on d5. The position takes a sharp turn.} (8... c5 $5) (8... Nbd7 $5)
9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. cxd5 exd5 11. Nxd5 Qd6 12. Nc3 {White's central structure is
good, and if he can keep it intact he could evne claim some sort of advantage
one he plays h3 and finshes his kingside development. However Black should
have good piece play and there must be some way of developing.} c5 {Natural}
13. Rg1 Nf6 14. Bg2 Bg4 15. Qd2 Nbd7 16. Ne5 Nxe5 {This exchange sacrifice is
rather obvious and it should give Leko at least enough compensation.} (16...
Rad8 17. Nxg4 Nxg4 18. h3 cxd4 19. O-O-O $1 {and I would rather take the white
pieces.}) 17. dxe5 Qxe5 18. Bxa8 Rxa8 19. Rg3 {For the exchange Black has good
piece play, a pawn and White has some difficulties finishing his development.}
Ne4 $6 (19... Qf5 $1 {This patient move binds White by installing a bishop on
f3. After that it is not so easy to find a move for Grischuk.}) 20. f4 $1 {
Perhaps Leko missed or underestimated this strong move. By forcing the queen
trade White loses a pawn, but he gains enough time to mount a
counter-initiative.} (20. Nxe4 Qxe4 $17) 20... Nxd2 21. fxe5 Nf3+ 22. Kf2 Nxe5
23. Rag1 {Suddenly there are some problems with the g7 pawn.} Bh5 $2 (23... Rd8
{it was necessary to start trying to hold the endgame down material.} 24. Rxg4
Rd2+ 25. Kf1 (25. Ne2 Nxg4+ 26. Rxg4 Rxb2 $11) 25... Nxg4 26. Rxg4 Rxb2 {and
Black shouldn't lose.}) 24. Rxg7+ Kh8 25. R7g2 Rd8 26. e4 c4 $6 27. Nd5 $1 {
Suddenly Black's king is in danger.} Bf3 {Based on a miscalculation.} 28. Rg7
Bh5 (28... Bxe4 29. Nf6 $18) 29. Nf6 Rd2+ 30. Ke3 Rd3+ 31. Kf4 Ng6+ 32. R1xg6
Rf3+ 33. Ke5 1-0

Grischuk with his two biggest fans: daughter Masha and wife Natalia Zhukova

Leko lost his way sometime after the exchange sacrifice

Inarkiev, Ernesto ½-½ Ding Liren
Solid set-up for both players led to a no-contact game.

[Event "Petrosian Memorial 2014"] [Site "Moscow RUS"] [Date "2014.11.09"] [Round "5"] [White "Inarkiev, E."] [Black "Ding Liren"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B17"] [WhiteElo "2688"] [BlackElo "2730"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2014.11.03"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. Nf3 Ngf6 6. Nc3 {This rare and unambitious move will probably not resurface very often.} Nb6 7. h3 Bf5 8. Bd3 Bxd3 9. Qxd3 e6 10. O-O Be7 11. Ne2 O-O 12. c4 Nbd7 13. Bf4 a5 14. a4 Nc5 15. Qe3 Na6 16. Rfd1 Nb4 {Black is very solid everywhere and it is hard to make any kind of progress. Breaking on d5 will always lead to passive simplifactions in the best case scenario for White.} 17. Rd2 b5 18. b3 bxc4 19. bxc4 Qb6 20. Nc3 Rad8 21. Rad1 Nd7 22. Qe2 Rfe8 23. Bg5 Bxg5 24. Nxg5 h6 25. Nf3 Qc7 26. Ne4 Rb8 27. Qe3 Nb6 28. Rc1 Nd7 29. Rcd1 Nb6 30. Qb3 Nd7 31. Qe3 1/2-1/2

The players in the analysis of a solid game

Gelfand, Boris 1-0 Morozevich, Alexander
Gelfand's sacrifice in the center of the board for two passed pawns on b5 and c5 was as obvious as it was strong. Morozevich struggled to find counterplay on the kingside, but with little success. After missing a tactical detail Gelfand gave Morozevich a great chance to equalize, but the Russian player missed it and Gelfand did not give him a second chance.

[Event "Petrosian Memorial 2014"] [Site "Moscow RUS"] [Date "2014.11.09"] [Round "5"] [White "Gelfand, B."] [Black "Morozevich, A."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D11"] [WhiteElo "2759"] [BlackElo "2724"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2014.11.03"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 c6 4. e3 a6 5. Nc3 b5 6. c5 g6 7. Ne5 Nfd7 {rare but logical. Usually Black develops the bishop first.} 8. Nd3 e5 9. a4 Bb7 10. axb5 axb5 11. Rxa8 Bxa8 12. b4 e4 $2 {I dont' think locking the center ri ght away brings any benefit to Black.} 13. Nf4 Be7 {Alreayd it was hard to avoid White sacrificing on d5.} (13... Bg7 14. Nfxd5 cxd5 15. Bxb5 O-O 16. O-O $14) (13... Nf6 {was probably objectively better.}) 14. Nfxd5 cxd5 15. Bxb5 O-O 16. O-O Nf6 17. Be2 Bb7 18. b5 Bc8 19. Qa4 {Black has no plan, White has two passed pawsn. That's worth the piece easily.} h5 20. Bd2 Be6 21. Qa7 Nbd7 22. Rc1 Ng4 23. Nd1 Kg7 24. Ra1 Bh4 25. c6 (25. h3 {there was no reason not to kick out the knight first.}) 25... Nb6 26. c7 $2 Qf6 (26... Qd6 $1 {Morozevich misses his only chance to equalize.} 27. Bxg4 Ra8 $1 {The players must have missed this resource.} 28. Qxa8 (28. Bxe6 Rxa7 29. Rxa7 Qxe6 30. Ba5 Nc8 31. Ra8 Be7 $1 32. b6 Qc6 $1 33. Rxc8 Qc1 $1 {and magically Black doesn't have enough to repel Black's threats. This is why Be7 is important, to have Bd6+ after h3.}) 28... Nxa8 29. c8=Q Bxc8 30. Bxc8 $11) 27. Be1 {playing it a little too safe.} Bc8 $2 (27... Ra8 $1) 28. h3 Nh6 29. Bb4 Rh8 30. Rc1 Nc4 31. Bxc4 dxc4 32. d5 {Now the pawns just roll forward.} Qg5 33. Qd4+ Kh7 34. Qxe4 Bb7 35. Nc3 Nf5 36. Qe5 Ra8 37. Ne4 Qh6 38. Rxc4 Nxe3 39. fxe3 Bxd5 40. c8=Q Rxc8 41. Rxc8 1-0

A much needed respite for Gelfand

Morozevich is joins Inarkiev at the bottom with -2

Photos by Eteri Kublashvili and Boris Dolmatovsky

Standings

Round Four Games

Select from the dropdown menu to replay the games

Schedule

Round 01 – November 04
Ding Liren 2730
½-½
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
Leko, Peter 2731
 ½-½
Morozevich, Alexander 2724
Aronian, Levon 2797
½-½ 
Gelfand, Boris 2759
Grischuk, Alexander 2795
1-0 
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
Round 02 – November 05
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
1-0
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
Gelfand, Boris 2759
 0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2795
Morozevich, Alexander 2724
½-½ 
Aronian, Levon 2797
Ding Liren 2730
½-½
Leko, Peter 2731
Round 03 – November 06
Leko, Peter 2731
½-½
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
Aronian, Levon 2797
½-½
Ding Liren 2730
Grischuk, Alexander 2795
1-0 
Morozevich, Alexander 2724
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
½-½
Gelfand, Boris 2759
Round 04 –November 08
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
½-½ 
Gelfand, Boris 2759
Morozevich, Alexander 2724
½-½
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
Ding Liren 2730
½-½ 
Grischuk, Alexander 2795
Leko, Peter 2731
½-½
Aronian, Levon 2797
Round 05 – November 09
Aronian, Levon 2797
½-½ 
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
Grischuk, Alexander 2795
1-0
Leko, Peter 2731
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
½-½ 
Ding Liren 2730
Gelfand, Boris 2759
1-0
Morozevich, Alexander 2724
Round 06 – November 10
Kramnik, Vladimir 2760   Morozevich, Alexander 2724
Ding Liren 2730   Gelfand, Boris 2759
Leko, Peter 2731   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688
Aronian, Levon 2797   Grischuk, Alexander 2795
Round 07 – November 11
Grischuk, Alexander 2795   Kramnik, Vladimir 2760
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2688   Aronian, Levon 2797
Gelfand, Boris 2759   Leko, Peter 2731
Morozevich, Alexander 2724   Ding Liren 2730

Links

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Topics: Moscow, Tashir

Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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idratherplay960 idratherplay960 11/10/2014 12:58
Leko may have lost but he is winning fans w his play and sacrifices in this tournament!
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