SuperUnited Croatia: Van Foreest wins rapid section

by Klaus Besenthal
7/23/2022 – Jorden van Foreest enters the blitz section of the SuperUnited Grand Chess Tour event in the sole lead, after having collected 12 points in the rapid. Van Foreest lost to Magnus Carlsen on Friday, but managed to defeat Alireza Firouzja, who lost the lead he had after six rounds. Nine rounds of blitz will be played both on Saturday and Sunday to decide who wins the third event of the GCT. | Photo: Lennart Ootes

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A sole leader

Magnus Carlsen would certainly have liked to win the rapid section, but he failed to do so because in round 7 he spoiled a winning position against Wesley So due to a tactical oversight. However, wins against Jorden van Foreest and Ivan Saric followed for the world champion. Carlsen is right behind Van Foreest in the overall standings with 11 points.

Wesley So, who drew all his games on Friday, also has 11 points. His opponents on the third day of action were Carlsen, Alireza Firouzja and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.

And finally, Firouzja also has 11 points. The Frenchman drew twice, against Leinier Dominguez and So, before losing to van Foreest to end the day.

A total of 18 rounds of 5+2 blitz will follow, in which just as many points can be won for the overall standings.  The outcome is still open!

Jorden van Foreest

Jorden van Foreest | Photo: Lennart Ootes

In round 9, So’s king ‘on wheels’ was unbelievably in time to save a draw in the game against Mamedyarov. The US grandmaster’s excellent technique allowed him to remain undefeated throughout the nine rounds. Analysis by GM Karsten Müller.

 

Final standings - Rapid

 

All games

 

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Klaus Besenthal is computer scientist, has followed and still follows the chess scene avidly since 1972 and since then has also regularly played in tournaments.
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