Speelman's Agony #79

by Jonathan Speelman
7/2/2018 – Jonathan annotates Jonathan...Rubeck that is, a math teacher from North London. And by the by — Jon can always use more material from readers. If your games are selected for the Agony column, not only will you get free detailed commentary of your games by one of chess’s great authors and instructors, and former world no. 4 player, but you also win a free three-month ChessBase Premium Account!

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A-level Agony

This weeks pair of games are by Jonathan Rubeck who writes:

RubeckI am a forty-three year old A-Level Maths teacher from Barnet [in North London].

I learnt chess at an early age but I have only been playing seriously for a few years now. My current policy is to play in the highest rating section in long-play tournaments so I was outgraded heavily in both these games. My opponents did not play what they were supposed to according to the online videos that I use to prepare my openings and so I was making it up as I went along from about move three in both cases.

The game that I won I managed to chip away a couple of pawns and then was astounded to see my opponent resign (he would not have done so had he known about my propensity to throw away won endgames).

The game I lost I let my advantage slip away in the middle game and then blundered in time trouble (less than five minutes left with no increment) and I stopped writing down the moves well before I was checkmated.

We start with the Agony (all annotations are mine, so no need for 'JS').

 

Click or tap the second game in the game list below the board to switch


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Jonathan Speelman, born in 1956, studied mathematics but became a professional chess player in 1977. He was a member of the English Olympic team from 1980–2006 and three times British Champion. He played twice in Candidates Tournaments, reaching the semi-final in 1989. He twice seconded a World Championship challenger: Nigel Short and then Viswanathan Anand against Garry Kasparov in London 1993 and New York 1995.
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psamant psamant 7/4/2018 08:03
@Fritzpa Thanks for replying Jon! I agree, my line leads nowhere and reaches a boring endgame very quickly. I played it out further now and only then noticed this fact. Jon, thanks for taking the time and analyzing all these games. They are closer to what we amateurs play and are more interesting for us as they teach us how to think in situations that we face very often.
Fritzpa Fritzpa 7/2/2018 11:16
Hi psamant This is Jon

Your line ending Rd6 looks about equal to me. Instead 28.f3 Nd6 29. Rxd6 Bxd6 is a bit more unbalanced but also looks reasonably okay. The whole late middlegame was very difficult and delicate and White would have been fighting hard if he'd found 26.Re1. I liked the game overall a lot because it's unusual to find such a clean positional thread until you get to a very high level.
psamant psamant 7/2/2018 09:29
In the Neil Bradbury game, in the notes to 23. a4, you have given:
23. d5! a5 24. d6! Red8 25. d7 Rc7 and then 26. Rc4 Rxc4
This makes white very active. Instead 26. ...Rcd7 doesn't allow white's bishop any decent square. A possible line 27. Rd7 Rd7 28. f3 Nxg3 29. hxg3 axb4 30. Rxb4 Rd6 might be better for black?
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