Sinquefield Rd9: Wesley So takes first

by Albert Silver
8/15/2016 – With so many players breathing down his neck, it was a wonder that a draw was sufficient for Wesley So to take clear first, and yet it almost wasn’t so. Veselin Topalov was the unlucky soul who reached a winning position against Aronian for a long time but failed to convert it, finishing fifth on tiebreak. The two wins of the day were signed by Caruana and Nakamura over Giri and Ding Liren respectively. Final report with GM analysis.

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2016 Sinquefield Cup

The 2016 Sinquefield Cup is an elite international event, featuring 10 of the strongest chess players in the world. Over the course of nine rounds, these competitors will battle for $300,000 in prize money (first: $75,000, second: $50,000, third: $40,000, last: $15,000) plus points toward the Grand Chess Tour and the coveted title of 2016 Sinquefield Cup Champion.

The venue is the Chess Club and Scholastic Center at 4657 Maryland Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63108. Tickets cost $10 per round or $80 for all ten rounds. Full information available at the official web site.

Hundreds of thousands of spectators worldwide are expected to enjoy the all-star commentary team of GM Yasser Seirawan, GM Maurice Ashley and WGM Jennifer Shahade as they provide keen insights and analysis, in depth player interviews and witty discussions. Commentary is also available on the CCSCSL YouTube Channel, Livestream and Twitch.

Participants

No.
Player
Rating
W-Rnk
Age
Country
1
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
2819
2
25
France
2
Fabiano Caruana
2807
4
24
USA
3
Levon Aronian
2784
5
31
Armenia
4
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
6
28
USA
5
Wesley So
2771
7
22
USA
6
Viswanathan Anand
2770
8
47
India
7
Anish Giri
2769
9
22
Holland
8
Veselin Topalov
2761
12
41
Bulgaria
9
Ding Liren
2755
13
23
China
10
Peter Svidler
2751
18
40
Russia

Rounds start at 1 p.m. local time (CDT), which is UTC-5, 20:00h Europe, 23:30 India.
Check the start time at your location here.

Round Nine - Sunday, August 14, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Veselin Topalov
2761
½-½
Levon Aronian
2784
Peter Svidler
2751
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
2770
Fabiano Caruana
2807
1-0
Anish Giri
2769
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
½-½
Wesley So
2771
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
1-0
Ding Liren
2755

Round nine

Photos by Lennart Ootes from official site

Sponsor and patron Rex Sinquefield is also always a good sport and self-effacing in his interviews

If the final round, and ending of the tournament, were to be described in a word, it would be ‘anticlimactic’. By no means is this meant as a slur of Wesley So, who won the great Sinquefield Cup as sole first and a magnificent feather to his cap, or to the other players, all the very cream of the crop in the chess world. However, as reader Arthur Nugent put it, “Yes, everyone is close in rating but boring results!”

The round was hardly denuded of excitement, either in anticipation before the start, or during the round after the action had started, but somehow, despite all the rumbling and spewing the promised volcanic eruption never seemed to take place. Three Berlins in five games no doubt played a role in this.

Wesley So took first and that is what counts!

In the first game, Wesley So faced MVL who had black, and the foremost question was whether the Frenchman would be able to defeat the leader to bring him down to his size and set up a potential tiebreak. This never seemed to happen. So played the Berlin, and though the endgame did produce a few tactical sparks, these were more along the lines of handwaving from the famous illusionist David Copperfield than genuine magic. When they shook hands, it came as no surprise to anyone.

There is no question MVL came with the intention of changing the fate of the event, but it did not work out

Right behind So, just a half point away, were three players: Aronian, Anand, and Topalov. Should any of them win, they would draw level with Wesley and a tiebreak match would be played. Tiebreak scores are only for the alternate places, but the tournament winner was going to be decided by combat.

Vishy Anand’s task was certainly nothing easy as he played black against Svidler, and though the Russian had had serious trouble in the event, that hardly meant he was a pushover for the last round. Anand’s choice of the Berlin did not mean he was seeking a peaceful end, but rather a protracted battle that left him room and time to try to outplay his opponent. Sadly for the Indian’s many fans, there seemed no chance this would take place as Svidler held his own comfortably and drew.

Anand had a significant mountain to climb, break down a top experienced grandmaster with black. It did not work out as he might have hoped, but he still took second place.

The two next players with a chance actually had to duke it out between themselves: Veselin Topalov and Levon Aronian. This was by far the greatest letdown for chess fans in general, and certainly a massive disappointment for Topalov. This was the third Berlin of the round, chosen by the Armenian, and whatever his intentions were they certainly did not materialize as he found himself in an inferior rook and bishop endgame. Things went from worse to outright bad for Black, and the Bulgarian had a winning position once he transitioned to a rook endgame. Time and time again he failed to find the clearest path, and whether from fatigue, overconfidence, or nerves, his last chance evaporated as did his opportunity to force a tiebreak with So.

Topalov's game was the center of attention of fans and players alike

Veselin Topalov - Levon Aronian

[Event "4th Sinquefield Cup 2016"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2016.08.14"] [Round "9"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2761"] [BlackElo "2792"] [PlyCount "162"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [TimeControl "40/7200:3600+30"] 1. e4 {(3s)} e5 {(5s)} 2. Nf3 {(5s)} Nc6 {(5s)} 3. Bb5 {(4s)} Nf6 {(12s)} 4. d3 {(5s)} Bc5 {(6s)} 5. c3 {(10s)} d5 {(6s)} 6. exd5 {(293s)} Qxd5 {(10s)} 7. Bc4 {(31s)} Qd6 {(8s)} 8. Qe2 {(184s)} O-O {(246s)} 9. Nbd2 {(39s)} a5 {(248s)} 10. Ng5 {(275s)} Bf5 {(657s)} 11. Nde4 {(172s)} Nxe4 {(246s)} 12. Nxe4 {(600s)} Bxe4 {(9s)} 13. dxe4 {(33s)} Nd8 {(292s)} 14. Bd2 {(524s)} c6 {(46s)} 15. a4 { (71s)} Ne6 {(198s)} 16. Rd1 {(230s)} Qe7 {(227s)} 17. g3 {(16s)} Rad8 {(53s)} 18. O-O {(21s)} Rd7 {(207s)} 19. Bc1 {(81s)} Rfd8 {(225s)} 20. Rxd7 {(68s)} Rxd7 {(20s)} 21. Kg2 {(17s)} g6 {(15s)} 22. Bh6 {( 250s)} Qf6 {(369s)} 23. Qg4 {(578s)} Rd8 {(180s)} 24. Bxe6 {(311s)} Qxe6 {(25s)} 25. Qxe6 {(8s)} fxe6 {(4s) } 26. Kf3 {(95s)} Kf7 {(34s)} 27. Ke2 {(24s)} Rd7 {(22s)} 28. h4 {(608s)} Bf8 { (484s)} 29. Be3 {(167s)} Be7 {(7s)} 30. Rb1 {(604s)} c5 {(57s)} 31. g4 {(154s)} h5 {(13s)} 32. gxh5 {(95s)} gxh5 {(4s)} 33. Rh1 {(184s)} Rd8 {(302s)} 34. Rh3 { (20s)} Rg8 {(1212s)} 35. Rf3+ {(6s)} Ke8 {(241s)} 36. Rg3 {(12s)} Kf7 {(7s)} 37. Kd3 {(8s)} b6 {(64s)} 38. Kc4 {(378s)} Bxh4 {(218s)} 39. Rh3 {(40s)} Bg5 { (4s)} 40. Bxg5 {(0s)} Rxg5 {(0s)} 41. Kb5 {(495s)} Rg2 {(239s)} 42. Rf3+ { (262s)} Ke7 {(29s)} 43. Kxb6 {(36s)} Rg8 {(353s)} 44. Rh3 {(391s)} c4 {(1581s)} 45. Rxh5 {(99s)} Rb8+ {(365s)} 46. Kc6 {( 94s)} Rxb2 {(125s)} 47. Rxe5 {(7s)} Rc2 {[#] (111s)} 48. Rxa5 {(288s)} ({Although the move played does not throw out the win,} 48. f4 {instead would have ended resistance quickly and painlessly.} Kf6 {Forced since Rxc3 meets f5 and the e-pawn falls with a fast-moving pawn roller.} 49. Kd6 Rd2+ 50. Kc5 Ra2 51. Kb5 {and Black is in zugzwang and something must fall.} Rf2 (51... Rb2+ 52. Kxc4) (51... Kf7 52. Kxa5 {etc.}) 52. Rc5 Rxf4 53. Rxc4 e5 54. Kxa5 {and White's win is not in doubt.}) 48... Rxc3 {(40s)} 49. Rc5 $4 {(103s) The first blunder that lets Black equalize, but White will get further chances.} (49. Kc5 $1 {was best.} Rc2 50. e5 c3 51. Kc4 Rxf2 52. Kxc3 Kd7 53. Rc5 {and with the black king cut off and the white king ready to support the pawn advance, the win is straightforward for White.}) 49... Rc2 $4 {(163s) An easy move to underestimate, but a fatal blunder nonetheless that puts Topalov back in the winning seat.} (49... Rc1 $1 {was necessary. The reason is that attacking the f-pawn doesn't really help Black's cause. It won't free the e-pawn to advance, and what Black really needs to do is push his c-pawn as fast as possible, protected, for counterplay.} 50. Kb5 {as in the game will now lack the same sting.} c3 51. Kb4 c2 52. Kb3 Rb1+ 53. Kxc2 Rb4 $1 54. a5 Kd6 55. Rc8 Ra4 { and the dangerous a-pawn will fall.}) 50. Kb5 {(6s)} c3 {(45s)} 51. Kb4 { (30s) Now Black has no choice but to trade his powerful c3 pawn for the much less important f2 pawn.} Rxf2 {(227s)} 52. Rxc3 {(33s)} Kd6 {(9s)} 53. Rc4 $2 { (197s) It isn't that this move changes the evaluation, but what is it for? Why not a5?} (53. a5 {certainly screamed to be played, no?}) 53... Rf8 {(909s)} 54. a5 {(11s)} Rb8+ {(17s)} 55. Ka3 $2 {(474s) The problem is that this fails to make progress, and while it does not draw, the only way will be to backtrack and recognize that Kc3 was the way to go.} (55. Kc3 {was less work overall.} Ke5 56. Ra4 {andn with the rook behind the pawn, the pressure will be total.} Rc8+ 57. Kd3 Rd8+ 58. Ke3 Ra8 59. a6 Ra7 60. Ra5+ Kd6 61. Kd4 Kc6 62. Ke5 Kd7 63. Kf6 Kd6 64. Ra1 $1 {Setting up the zugzwang.} Kd7 65. e5 $1 { Zugzwang!}) 55... Ra8 {(80s)} 56. Ka4 {(30s)} Ra7 {(14s)} 57. Rd4+ $4 {(883s) Topalov misses his last chance. With this move, he lets Aronian's king out of his cage and free to join the fray. Now the position is equal, even if requiring some technique, and the Armenian never lets go now.} (57. Kb4 Rb7+ 58. Kc3 {and the game proceeds as in the line above with 55.Kc3.}) (57. Kb5 $2 Rb7+ 58. Ka6 Rb2 {and with the white king cut off, Black can equalize himself.} ) 57... Kc5 {(159s)} 58. Rd8 {(39s)} Rb7 {(168s)} 59. Rc8+ {(98s)} Kd4 {(11s)} 60. a6 {(9s)} Re7 {(531s)} 61. Kb5 {(45s)} Kxe4 {(32s)} 62. Rc4+ {(217s)} Kd3 { (87s)} 63. Ra4 {(6s)} e5 {(4s)} 64. Ra3+ {(248s)} Kd4 {(112s)} 65. a7 {(7s)} Rb7+ {(8s)} 66. Kc6 {(5s)} Rxa7 {(4s)} 67. Rxa7 {(5s)} e4 {(3s)} 68. Ra4+ { (171s)} Kd3 {(5s)} 69. Kd5 {(21s)} e3 {(4s)} 70. Ra3+ {(16s)} Kd2 {(5 s)} 71. Kd4 {(10s)} e2 {(3s)} 72. Ra2+ {(11s)} Kd1 {(4s)} 73. Kd3 {(37s)} e1=N+ {(7s)} 74. Kc3 {(11s)} Nf3 {(4s)} 75. Rf2 {(32s)} Ne1 {(4s)} 76. Rd2+ {(59s)} Kc1 { (4s)} 77. Rh2 {(22s)} Kd1 {(5s)} 78. Rf2 {(12s)} Kc1 {(4s)} 79. Rd2 {(103s)} Nf3 {(5s)} 80. Rd5 {(78s)} Ne1 {(10s)} 81. Rd8 {(13s)} Nf3 {(17s)} 1/2-1/2

Although most fans were glued to their seats waiting to see if Topalov would convert or not, the day did not end on a tally of five draws. It is not without irony that the two wins of the day were precisely games that had no effect on the top spot.

The fastest game of the day was none of the ones described above, and if it is brought up in the end, it is not because the game was poor by any means, but simply because from a sporting point of view, the main interest was in the games that affected the winner of the tournament. Playing white, Hikaru Nakamura defeated Ding Liren in no time at all, and after 28 moves the Chinese player resigned. Nakamura faced a Semi-Slav, and after choosing a slightly less popular, but reputable line with 14.b3, his opponent immediately went astray and never recovered from his misstep.

It was 14 moves of theory rattled out at full speed, and another 14 to win

The second decisive game was between Fabiano Caruana and Anish Giri, and compounding the misery (in chess) of the likable Dutch player, his Open Ruy Lopez went sour in the middlegame and Caruana was mercifully efficient in his win, not dragging it out any longer than needed. This did put Caruana at plus one with 5.0/9, the same score as Anand, Aronian, and Topalov, but left him in fourth on tiebreak, behind Anand and Aronian, though just ahead of Topalov.

Fabiano's positive thinking was reflected as much in his game as in his t-shirt

Fabiano Caruana - Anish Giri (annotated by GM Elshan Moradiabadi)

In the end, one must congratulate So for his victory, even if lamenting the modest score that still gave him sole first. However, it was up to his rivals to show him up if they felt likewise. In second place was Anand, and third Aronian.

Anish shows what he thinks of his game and his tournament

Garry Kasparov is already there, ready for good times with the Ultimate Moves

On Tuesday August 16 will be the Ultimate Moves challenge with Garry Kasparov, and promises to be a ton of fun as usual. Be sure to not miss it.

Closing ceremony

Trophies and winner's check

Two players pondering their last round wins and possibly missed opportunities in the event

A happy Wesley So next to a jubilant Kasparov

Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield bestowing the prizes and first place check for US$75 thousand

Wesley So, winner of the 2016 Sinquefield Cup

Garry Kasparov, Wesley So, Jeanne Sinquefield, and Rex Sinquefield

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Replay games of round nine

Standings after nine rounds

Pairings

Round One - Friday, August 5, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Ding Liren
2755
½-½
Levon Aronian
2784
Wesley So
2771
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
Anish Giri
2769
½-½
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
Viswanathan Anand
2770
½-½
Fabiano Caruana
2807
Veselin Topalov
2761
1-0
Peter Svidler
2751
Round Two - Saturday, August 6, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Levon Aronian
2784
1-0
Peter Svidler
2751
Fabiano Caruana
2807
½-½
Veselin Topalov
2761
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
1-0
Anish Giri
2769
Ding Liren
2755
½-½
Wesley So
2771
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
0-1
Viswanathan Anand
2770
Round Three - Sunday, August 7, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Wesley So
2771
½-½
Levon Aronian
2784
Anish Giri
2769
½-½
Ding Liren
2755
Viswanathan Anand
2770
½-½
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
Veselin Topalov
2761
½-½
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
Peter Svidler
2751
½-½
Fabiano Caruana
2807
Round Four - Monday, August 8, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Levon Aronian
2784
½-½
Fabiano Caruana
2807
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
½-½
Peter Svidler
2751
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
½-½
Veselin Topalov
2761
Ding Liren
2755
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
2770
Wesley So
2771
½-½
Anish Giri
2769
Round Five - Tuesday, August 9, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Anish Giri
2769
½-½
Levon Aronian
2784
Viswanathan Anand
2770
½-½
Wesley So
2771
Veselin Topalov
2761
1-0
Ding Liren
2755
Peter Svidler
2751
½-½
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
Fabiano Caruana
2807
½-½
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
Round Six - Thursday, August 11, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Levon Aronian 2771
0-1
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
Hikaru Nakamura 2731
½-½
Fabiano Caruana
2807
Ding Liren 2793
1-0
Peter Svidler
2751
Wesley So 2779
1-0
Veselin Topalov
2761
Anish Giri 2765
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
2770
Round Seven - Friday, August 12, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Viswanathan Anand
2770
½-½
Levon Aronian
2784
Veselin Topalov
2761
½-½
Anish Giri
2769
Peter Svidler
2751
½-½
Wesley So
2771
Fabiano Caruana
2807
½-½
Ding Liren
2755
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
½-½
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
Round Eight - Saturday, August, 13, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Levon Aronian
2784
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
Ding Liren
2755
½-½
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
Wesley So
2771
½-½
Fabiano Caruana
2807
Anish Giri
2769
0-1 
Peter Svidler
2751
Viswanathan Anand
2770
½-½
Veselin Topalov
2761
Round Nine - Sunday, August 14, 1pm
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Veselin Topalov
2761
½-½
Levon Aronian
2784
Peter Svidler
2751
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
2770
Fabiano Caruana
2807
1-0
Anish Giri
2769
M. Vachier-Lagrave
2819
½-½
Wesley So
2771
Hikaru Nakamura
2791
1-0
Ding Liren
2755

Links

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Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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mwilfred mwilfred 8/17/2016 05:36
@stoosans...Many thanks for responding! The moves seem to have been corrected now or something but when I played the moves earlier that pawn wasn't there for some reason. :) LOL Anyway, well done Wesley...it's about time you came out of the shadows of Nakamura and Caruana to hold your own title!
Petrarlsen Petrarlsen 8/16/2016 09:28
@libyantiger : Carlsen is clearly one of the players that I prefer, but for the Sinquefield Cup your comment is not perhaps the most appropriate, as Carlsen, who participated in the three editions of the Sinquefield Cup, won only the first, and was afterward beaten by Caruana in 2014 and Aronian in 2015 !!
libyantiger libyantiger 8/16/2016 08:41
enjoy titles in the absence of carlsen
wordsmith97 wordsmith97 8/16/2016 04:16
it seems to me that the writer is a little bit unappreciative of Wesley's achievement. I just wish that he has a talent in chess that can hold a candle to Wesley's. Until that happen, please give credit to whom it is due.
stoosans stoosans 8/16/2016 12:36
mwilfred - it's not a discovered check. Not from Qe5, and not from Rg - seeing how Black's g4 pawn blocks g-file
mwilfred mwilfred 8/16/2016 12:12
I'm a little confused by the Nakamura-Liren game; the move 25. ... Ne2+ is a discovered check yet white plays 26. Bxe2 instead of moving the King. Something is obviously amiss there isn't it?
sayros87 sayros87 8/16/2016 11:18
I Agree , Giri's performances were affected due to marrying too young ...hard to see him coming back to top 10 any soon. he needs a serious break from chess to think about himself.
mango hills mango hills 8/16/2016 09:28
Wesley So is a young, natural talent, very extra ordinary, a rare breed, a rare find. He deserves to be Number 1.
GregEs GregEs 8/16/2016 08:38
Wow great report for the closing of Sinquefield elite Tournament. Nice photos and thorough analysis of the last round games. Seems one of the youngest player [GM So] won this tournament. While the other youngest [GM Giri] was not performing well but will surely be back in his form.

Congratulations to all winners, and thanks to ChessBase for the updated news since Round 1 of Sinquefield.
geraldsky geraldsky 8/16/2016 08:19
Giri's performances were affected due to marrying too young like Karjakin before.
Petrarlsen Petrarlsen 8/16/2016 07:24
I think that many persons don't really put things completely in perspective, concerning the results of this tournament.

The level of the tournament was very high (there wasn't any player below 2750), and we can't expect comparable scores as in tournaments such as Dortmund, for exemple (where there were 3 players out of 8 who were below 2700).

First exemple, the winner, Wesley So : his performance was 2857. It is exactly the present rating of Magnus Carlsen ! This means that his level of play in this tournament was exactly equal to Carlsen's present average level of play ! Really, nothing to be ashamed of, in my opinion !

Second exemple, Veselin Topalov ; vincero says about him that he : "simply can no longer concentrate at such a level the entire game.... any longer". But his rating performance was 2819 - and his best Elo rating in all his career was 2816. So he was playing at a globally very honorable level. Obviously, he can do better sometimes, but no one can play his very best chess in every tournament, and this tournament certainly doesn't seem to have been a bad tournament for Topalov, considering his rating performance. As an aside, Topalov's best Elo rating (2816) was only last year (in July 2015...), so we certainly can't say that he is an old player who can't really play good chess anymore !...

It can be noted that the five first players have a 2800+ performance ; I don't think that it happens every day to have a tournament with half of the players having a 2800+ performance as in this case...
barocchio barocchio 8/16/2016 07:18
In 2014 and 2015, Magnus Carlsen participated but didnt win.
karlmarx2000 karlmarx2000 8/16/2016 04:43
GM Wes is the champion of this event, even if some of your lines disliked the outcome of the tournament.. Had Carlsen won this one, your words may be more positive.. IMO... hehehe..
Pentium Infinite Pentium Infinite 8/15/2016 10:12
These happens when Carlsen is absent.
notyetagm notyetagm 8/15/2016 08:06
@CostaMaison3: Yes, at Bilbao and now Sinquefeld Cup Giri was winless -3 and clear last.

Bilboa: +0 -3 =7
S. Cup: +0 -3 =6

vincero vincero 8/15/2016 04:33
TOPalov easily should have had 5 wins,,,,,but simply can no longer concentrate at such a level the entire game.... any longer
johnmk johnmk 8/15/2016 03:06
Congrats to Wesley. IMO, he won with ... solid play. He was solid all along and when two opponents made inaccuracies he pounced and cleaned up with fantastic technique.
ulyssesganesh ulyssesganesh 8/15/2016 02:49
probably a football score (3 pts. for a win and 1pt. for a draw would have ensured more fight and more decisive games!
vinniethepooh vinniethepooh 8/15/2016 08:41
Relief!By winning the last round,Caruana avoided the title-Draw Master,which Giri got in the Candidates.... :)
Denix Denix 8/15/2016 08:38
Congratulations to Wesley! The +2 formula works!
CostaMaison3 CostaMaison3 8/15/2016 08:34
This is the second tournament in a row for Giri to score the last place in the final standing.
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