Norway 04: Karjakin lone winner

by Alejandro Ramirez
6/7/2014 – A relatively dull round compared to the excitement of the previous games. However two games stood out from the rest. Caruana and Giri played a very interesting battle that resulted in a strange draw. Karjakin somehow turned around a game that was clearly worse for him into a win. More interesting were the Mindball games that the players participated on the free day.

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The Unibet Norway Chess Tournament will take place in Stavanger, Norway from June 2nd to June 13th. The tournament features some of the best players in the world and has a massive rating average of 2774.

Free Day

The players enjoyed some recreational activities during the free day, as we all as visiting the Scholastic Tournament that was being held:

The players were mesmerized by this "Mindball" game which measured brain activity to move a ball. The winner was the one whose brain activity overpowered to the other! In the above picture Sergey Karjakin is playing his wife Galiya Kamalova. The organizers promised not to reveal the results!

Levon Aronian had a go at it against some of the local kids

Veselin Topalov being interviewed after being the first grandmaster to win a game of Mindball...

Simen Agdestein in action, but he lost

Magnus Carlsen also visited the scholastic tournament

The tournament took place in Vitenfabrikken, a science factory for kids.
There were lots of interesting stuff to do in addition to chess!

If there was any doubt that chess is popular in Norway...

Round Four

Round 04 – June 07 2014, 15:30h
Simen Agdestein 2628
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2783
Fabiano Caruana 2791
½-½
Anish Giri 2752
Veselin Topalov 2772
½-½
Magnus Carlsen 2881
Levon Aronian 2815
½-½
Peter Svidler 2753
Sergey Karjakin 2771
1-0
Alexander Grischuk 2792

Agdestein, Simen ½-½ Vladimir Kramnik
A relatively dry game. If anyone had any chances it was Kramnik, but by the time he had something it was more of an illusion than anything else. Agdestein holds his fourth draw in a row and Kramnik remains in a solid second place with +1.

Solo second now that Grischuk lost: Vladimir Kramnik

Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ Giri, Anish
Probably one of the more interesting games of today's round. The attacks on opposite flanks guaranteed some excitement, and indeed many tactics made the game a toss-up. However at the end both Giri and Caruana were able to destroy the opponent's initiative and the game fizzled into a draw.

Topalov, Veselin ½-½ Carlsen, Magnus
Topalov came up with an interesting novelty, and Carlsen responded by grabbing pawns! This sounds much more exciting than it actually was as the game ended in a repetition on move 20.

Topalov did not want to push the issue in a game that still had life in it

Aronian, Levon ½-½ Svidler, Peter
A deep Grunfeld, as is common in Svidler's life. With perfect defense the Russian managed to get a slightly worse endgame that he had absolutely no problem holding.

Levon Aronian's deviousness was insufficient for a win

Peter Svidler: "15.Bg5 was a very devious move. I had to spend 20 minutes on it, that's 20 minutes of my life I will never get back. What happened Levon, I thought we were friends!"

Karjakin, Sergey 1-0 Grischuk, Alexander

[Event "Norway Chess 2014"] [Site " Sandnes"] [Date "2014.06.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Result "*"] [ECO "D85"] [WhiteElo "2771"] [BlackElo "2792"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "107"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Be3 c5 8. Rc1 Qa5 9. Qd2 O-O 10. Nf3 Bg4 11. Ng5 (11. d5 {was Kramnik's try against Svidler in 2009. Ng5 is not as common.}) 11... Na6 12. h3 Bd7 13. Bd3 $6 {This move might be too optimistic.} Rac8 14. d5 c4 15. Bb1 Nc5 16. Bd4 { surprisingly this had all been played before in a low rated game between Moussa-Kauffman, 2010.} Bxd4 {A new move, and one that definitely makes sense.} 17. cxd4 (17. Qxd4 Nd3+ $1 {Anyways.} 18. Bxd3 cxd3 19. Qxd3 Bb5 $1 $17 {The inability to castle kills White's coordination, Black is certainly to be prefered.}) 17... c3 $1 {Karjakin must have missed this idea; or he overestimated his chances.} 18. Rxc3 {the only move, or c2+ was lethal.} Nd3+ $1 {This is the point of the combination, the h1 rook is going to hang to a skewer.} 19. Rxd3 Rc1+ 20. Ke2 Qxd2+ 21. Kxd2 Rxh1 22. Rb3 {White has compensation for the lost exchange. He does have one pawn and his central pawn mass is nothing to sniff at, however it is not sufficient.} b5 (22... b6 {was both more natural and more solid.}) 23. Nf3 f6 24. Ne1 a5 $6 {Grischuk advances his queenside pawns, but they are not a trump. They become weaker the more they move forward.} 25. Rc3 Rc8 26. Rc5 b4 27. Bd3 {By this point it has become clear that moving the pawns forward did not help Black at all.} a4 28. Ra5 b3 29. axb3 axb3 30. Ra7 Rd8 31. Rb7 {With the death of b3 it is Black that has to thing about equality, but it will still be within grasp.} Ra8 $5 { Keeping the game complex. This is not a bad move, but with Grischuk's consistent time trouble it was wiser to level the position as soon as possible. } (31... Ba4 32. Ra7 (32. Rb4 Ra8 33. Bc4 Kf8 $11) 32... Bd7 $11) 32. Rxd7 Ra2+ 33. Kc3 Rxe1 34. Kxb3 Rxf2 35. Rxe7 Re3 36. Kc4 Rd2 37. Bb1 Rb2 $2 {This is the start of the end for Grischuk.} (37... Re1 $1 38. d6 Kf8 39. Rb7 Red1 {was still equal.}) 38. d6 $1 {The pawn is very powerful. The rooks are surprisingly useless against it.} Kf8 39. Bd3 Rd2 40. Bf1 Ra3 (40... Re1 41. Kc3 Rdd1 {is unpleasant but had to be played.}) 41. Kb4 Ra1 42. Bc4 Rc1 43. Rf7+ Ke8 44. d7+ Kd8 45. Kc5 $1 {The support of the pawn is too much, while the e4 and d4 pawns keep the rooks away from the action.} Kc7 46. Rxh7 Rcd1 ( 46... Rdc2 47. d8=Q+ Kxd8 48. Kd6 $18) 47. d5 Rc1 48. g4 g5 49. d8=Q+ Kxd8 50. Kd6 Ke8 51. Bb5+ Kf8 52. Ke6 Re1 53. Kxf6 {The pawn count is too high!} Rf2+ 54. Kg6 {a small bit o precision. e4 is now taboo, so Grischuk resigned.} (54. Kg6 Rxe4 55. Rh8+ Ke7 56. Re8+) *

 

Daniel King shows the game Karjakin vs Grischuk

Alexander Grischuk: "I'm playing terrible in this tournament, the fact
that I won two games in a row doesn't mean much"

Standings

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Schedule of Events

Date
Time
Event
Venue
Playchess commentary
02.06.2014 17.00 Blitz Flor & Fjære  
03.06.2014 15.30 Round 1 Scandic Stavanger Forus Daniel King
04.06.2014 15.30 Round 2 Scandic Stavanger Forus Simon Williams
05.06.2014 15.30 Round 3 Scandic Stavanger Forus Yasser Seirawan
07.06.2014 15.30 Round 4 Vågen VGS, Sandnes Yasser Seirawan
08.06.2014 15.30 Round 5 Scandic Stavanger Forus Yasser Seirawan
09.06.2014 15.30 Round 6 Aarbakke fabrikkhall, Bryne Chris Ward
10.06.2014 15.30 Round 7 Scandic Stavanger Forus Daniel King
12.06.2014 15.30 Round 8 Scandic Stavanger Forus Simon Williams
13.06.2014 14.30 Round 9 Scandic Stavanger Forus Daniel King

Pairings

Round 01 – June 03 2014, 15:30h
Levon Aronian 2815
½-½
Simen Agdestein 2628
Sergey Karjakin 2771
½-½
Veselin Topalov 2772
Alexander Grischuk 2792
0-1
Fabiano Caruana 2791
Peter Svidler 2753
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2783
Magnus Carlsen 2881
½-½
Anish Giri 2752
Round 02 – June 04 2014, 15:30h
Simen Agdestein 2628
½-½
Anish Giri 2752
Vladimir Kramnik 2783
½-½
Magnus Carlsen 2881
Fabiano Caruana 2791
1-0
Peter Svidler 2753
Veselin Topalov 2772
0-1
Alexander Grischuk 2792
Levon Aronian 2815
1-0
Sergey Karjakin 2771
Round 03 – June 05 2014, 15:30h
Sergey Karjakin 2771
½-½
Simen Agdestein 2628
Alexander Grischuk 2792
1-0
Levon Aronian 2815
Peter Svidler 2753
½-½
Veselin Topalov 2772
Magnus Carlsen 2881
½-½
Fabiano Caruana 2791
Anish Giri 2752
0-1
Vladimir Kramnik 2783
Round 04 – June 07 2014, 15:30h
Simen Agdestein 2628
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2783
Fabiano Caruana 2791
½-½
Anish Giri 2752
Veselin Topalov 2772
½-½
Magnus Carlsen 2881
Levon Aronian 2815
½-½
Peter Svidler 2753
Sergey Karjakin 2771
1-0
Alexander Grischuk 2792
Round 05 – June 08 2014, 15:30h
Alexander Grischuk 2792   Simen Agdestein 2628
Peter Svidler 2753   Sergey Karjakin 2771
Magnus Carlsen 2881   Levon Aronian 2815
Anish Giri 2752   Veselin Topalov 2772
Vladimir Kramnik 2783   Fabiano Caruana 2791
Round 06 – June 09 2014, 15:30h
Simen Agdestein 2628   Fabiano Caruana 2791
Veselin Topalov 2772   Vladimir Kramnik 2783
Levon Aronian 2815   Anish Giri 2752
Sergey Karjakin 2771   Magnus Carlsen 2881
Alexander Grischuk 2792
 
Peter Svidler 2753
Round 07 – June 10 2014, 15:30h
Peter Svidler 2753   Simen Agdestein 2628
Magnus Carlsen 2881   Alexander Grischuk 2792
Anish Giri 2752   Sergey Karjakin 2771
Vladimir Kramnik 2783   Levon Aronian 2815
Fabiano Caruana 2791   Veselin Topalov 2772
Round 08 – June 12 2014, 15:30h
Simen Agdestein 2628   Veselin Topalov 2772
Levon Aronian 2815   Fabiano Caruana 2791
Sergey Karjakin 2771   Vladimir Kramnik 2783
Alexander Grischuk 2792   Anish Giri 2752
Peter Svidler 2753   Magnus Carlsen 2881
Round 09 – June 13 2014, 14:30h
Magnus Carlsen 2881   Simen Agdestein 2628
Anish Giri 2752   Peter Svidler 2753
Vladimir Kramnik 2783   Alexander Grischuk 2792
Fabiano Caruana 2791   Sergey Karjakin 2771
Veselin Topalov 2772   Levon Aronian 2815

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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Luis Baquero Luis Baquero 6/7/2014 11:41
Aronian-Svidler 38.g4 = fixed draw?
My vote for Caruana and Grischuk whose draws , with a high probability, are not fixed.
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