Najdorf Chess Festival has seven-way tie

by Albert Silver
7/23/2014 – The MetLife Najdorf Chess Festival was recently held in Warsaw, Poland, in tribute to one of Poland's greatest players, with a variety of events and dozens of sponsors. The lineup of the main swiss open had a top-notch roster, with Alexander Areshchenko (2701) at the summit, followed by Ivan Cheparinov (2693), 19-year-old Vladimir Fedoseev (2668), and dozens of grandmasters.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

A view of the Warsaw nightline

Players indulge in their passion

It was a very tough event, with no player able to distance themselves over the nine rounds, and it ended in a massive tie for first with seven players on 6.5/9, separated by tiebreaks only. Armenian grandmaster Tigran L. Petrosian took first, followed by Vasif Durarbayil from Azerbaidjan in second, and Aleksandr Shimanov in third. In fourth to seventh, also with 6.5/9 are Bartolomiej Macieja, IM Vitaly Bernadskiy, who also scored a GM norm, Vladimir Fedoseev, and Michal Krasenkow.

Though MetLife was the main sponsor, there were two dozen others

Alexander Areshchenko was the top rated player, but neither he....

...nor Ivan Cheparinov, second seed, were able to shine in the dense field.

Third seed Vladimir Fedoseev was among those who tied for first at 6.5/9

There were children's events as well

The grass is always greener on the other side

Concentration or despair?

The children run to the one person who can lift their spirits for sure:

Snoopy!

The winners displaying their certificates

The prize winners of the main open: Tigran Petrosian in first place with a check for 5000 Euros,
Vasif Durarbayil from Azerbaidjan in second, and Aleksandr Shimanov in third.

Final standings

Rk
S.No
Ti.
Name
Fed
Rtg
Pts
TB
1
9
GM
Petrosian, Tigran L.
ARM
2629
6.5
42.50
2
18
GM
Durarbayli, Vasif
AZE
2590
6.5
40.50
3
5
GM
Shimanov, Aleksandr
RUS
2644
6.5
40.00
4
13
GM
Macieja, Bartłomiej
POL
2607
6.5
37.50
5
25
IM
Bernadskiy, Vitaliy
UKR
2550
6.5
37.50
6
3
GM
Fedoseev, Vladimir
RUS
2668
6.5
37.00
7
10
GM
Krasenkow, Michal
POL
2623
6.5
34.50
8
23
GM
Markowski, Tomasz
POL
2572
6.0
38.00
9
15
GM
Kempinski, Robert
POL
2597
6.0
38.00
10
16
GM
Sandipan, Chanda
IND
2597
6.0
37.00
11
14
GM
Rozentalis, Eduardas
LTU
2603
6.0
36.00
12
12
GM
Miśta, Aleksander
POL
2609
6.0
35.50
13
6
GM
Ragger, Markus
AUT
2639
6.0
33.50
14
20
GM
Duda, Jan-krzysztof
POL
2580
6.0
30.50
15
8
GM
Beliavsky, Alexander G
SLO
2631
6.0
30.00
16
29
GM
Dragun, Kamil
POL
2518
5.5
39.50
17
4
GM
Melkumyan, Hrant
ARM
2647
5.5
38.00
18
17
GM
Vovk, Yuri
UKR
2591
5.5
36.00
19
32
IM
Raznikov, Danny
ISR
2500
5.5
36.00
20
7
GM
Agdestein, Simen
NOR
2637
5.5
35.50

Click for complete standings


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.




Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register

obinna uwasomba obinna uwasomba 7/23/2014 08:22
@hpaul, I quite agree with you..to think they had "dozens of sponsors"
hpaul hpaul 7/23/2014 12:06
Big difference in money paid to 1st place and to poor Krasenkow in 7th, though they got the same score. I prefer the arrangement where tie-breaks are only used if necessary to award a single trophy, with money prizes split evenly among those who have the same chess result. (A championship title, in my opinion, should also not be settled by tie-breaks, but either be shared or decided by a play-off.) Tie-breaks measure factors that often are not under the player's control, and are incidental to the aim of the game. I would like to see the use of tie-breaks reduced in all tournament tables, and rather give results as, for example: Places 1-2: players A & B. 3-5: players C, D, and E, etc. I don't see what benefit comes from differentiating among players who objectively had the same chess result.
1