"The boy who never sits" is now a GM

by Sagar Shah
8/23/2018 – People are predicting a very bright future for Indian chess and one of the main reasons why is Nihal Sarin (the other one is Praggnanandhaa). Nihal became a GM at the age of 14 years, 1 month and 1 day when he achieved his final GM norm at the Abu Dhabi Masters 2018 with one round to spare. This makes the young boy the 12th youngest GM in the history of the game. In this article, we tell you all about the people who have helped Nihal to become the chess player that he is. At the same time, we analyze two of his most recent games (from 2018) and show you why he is a technical and positional monster. Nihal's restlessness earned him the title of "the boy who never sits"! Well, we have now officially changed it to "the boy who never stops"! | Photo: Amruta Mokal

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The journey is more important than the destination

On the 14th of August, Nihal Sarin became the 53rd Grandmaster of India. Hailing from Thrissur in Kerala, the Nihal scored his third GM norm at the Abu Dhabi Masters 2018 and achieved the highest title in the game of chess at the age of just 14 days 1 month and 1 day. To achieve the GM title, one must cross the rating threshold of 2500 Elo points besides completing the three requisite norms. But Nihal’s live rating as on 16th of August 2018 is already 2572! This just goes to show that the boy has already surpassed the level of a “normal” GM and is very close to the next milestone of achieving 2600 Elo rating.

Just to put things into perspective, Nihal achieving his GM title at the age of 14 years 1 month and 1 day makes him twelfth youngest chess player in the history of the game to get the GM title. He has achieved this title faster than some of the best players in the world currently — Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Fabiano Caruana, Anish Giri, Wesley So and Viswanathan Anand are some of the names. 

Nihal Sarin

53rd GM of India at the age of 14 years, 1 month and 1 day | Photo: Amruta Mokal

I first saw Nihal Sarin at the World Juniors 2014 in Pune. Not many knew about him back then. The boy was, after all, just 10 years old at that point.

The World Juniors is a tournament where the best players below the age of 20 from all over the globe gather to compete with each other. Nihal was just half the age of most of his competitors. There were a few other such young Indian players playing in the tournament, but anyone with a bit of chess experience could instantly sense that there was something special about Nihal. 

After making his move, Nihal would get up from his chair and move around. He would walk from one end of the tournament hall to another, clasping his fingers. He was not tense or afraid; he was just restless. A crowd would gather around his game as the 10-year-old would make a move on the chess board. Then in the next instant, he would get up. His opponents would fight hard to win the game, but deep within they would be in awe of this wunderkind. 

The boy who never sits | Sagar Shah Youtube

The story behind this video: I had just entered the playing hall. A huge crowd had gathered around a board. I went there and saw this young boy playing his move and moving around. I took my camera and shot the video! Nihal was rated just 2076. His opponent, Tadeas Kriebel, was 2428.

But what was even more impressive was the post-game conference with this young lad. He would enter the commentary room which was filled with experts with years of chess knowledge (IM V. Saravanan, IM Prathamesh Mokal, WGM Soumya Swaminathan, WGM Swati Ghate and myself), and floor us with his erudition. The boy could not only remember the entire game, but also the plans and ideas behind each and every move made by him as well as his opponent!

Nihal's first post-game conference | ChessBase India Youtube

For Nihal’s parents Sarin Abdul Salam and Shijin, Nihal’s phenomenal memory and chess prowess didn’t completely come as a surprise. Dr. Sarin says, “Nihal could recognize the flags of all the 190 odd countries by the age of three, could already speak fluently in English by the time he was in upper kindergarten, knew the multiplication tables until sixteen by the time he turned six and enrolled into the first standard.”

Nihal Sarin with his parents, grandfather and little sister

Nihal with his parents, grandfather and little sister | Photo: Nihal Sarin’s archives

Nihal with coach Nirmal EPAs a six-year-old, Nihal was a restless kid. In order to channel his energy in the right direction, Nihal’s parents decided to introduce him to the game of chess. It was his grandfather who taught him the rules of the game. The boy picked it up immediately and in his second tournament itself won a trophy. The talent was clearly there and Nihal’s first coach Mathew P. Joseph Pottoore let Nihal’s father know about the same. But nothing really was planned in Nihal’s chess career. Right people entered at the right time in Nihal’s life and always took him to the next level.

Coach Nirmal EP, the Kerala State Champion, started training Nihal when he was eight years old. He ensured that he worked with Nihal on removing his flaws, but with minimal interference. Nirmal let the boy’s talent flow and just directed him when things went completely wrong. This has always been the approach with which things have been done in Nihal’s life. There is never a fixed a routine or a schedule or a plan. The boy simply does the things he loves and keeps getting better at it.

Nihal Sarin and his sister Neha with his first coach Matthew Josepth Pottoore

Nihal and his sister Neha with his first coach Matthew Pottoore | Photo: Nihal Sarin’s archives

In a stroke of serendipity, Nihal found his next trainer, GM Dimitri Komarov. This was when Nihal was on his first foreign trip, a month after becoming the National Under-9 champion, to Al-Ain to play the 2013 World Youth. Komarov was the coach of the UAE team. He was making a dedicated effort to make one of his students solve a problem. However, the student was not showing much interest in finding the solution. Nihal happened to be checking out the proceedings between Komarov and his student, and this caught the grandmaster’s eye. He called the boy to him and asked him to solve the position, which was duly dispatched in a flash.

Nihal Sarin with Dmitri Komarov

Dimitri Komarov worked with Nihal and eliminated many of the flaws in his game | Photo: Nihal Sarin's archives

Komarov was surprised at the little boy’s ability to analyze a bunch of variations in a single go — he fell in love with Nihal, like so many of his fans who have come across him. Having worked with some of the best talents in the past, Komarov was in the perfect position to eliminate the flaws in Nihal’s games. But once again, care was taken that the coach never impressed his will on the kid. Dr. Sarin says, "We never interfere in the decisions Nihal has to make. We just guide him and let him take the decisions". From a very young age, Nihal has developed an independent thought process and an ability to break down complex problems and come to a solution.

Nihal’s focus has been entirely on how he can become a better player. You can see a complete disinterest in him when you speak to him about norms, titles, ratings or winning championships. That’s why winning the national under-9 title, World Champion under-10 or silver medal at world under-12 have very little meaning for Nihal. He is obsessed with playing chess and that’s what he likes to talk about and discuss. It doesn’t really matter to him who the opposite person is. Whether he is a GM or a rank amateur, if there is a discussion about chess, he will give it his all.

Once, when Nihal was travelling with his friend and manager Priyadarshan Banjan, the 11-year-old asked, "What does it mean to be a great player?" Banjan replied,"What does ...Re3 remind you of?" Well-versed with classics even at that age, Nihal instantly shot out, "Reti-Alekhine." And that's when Priyadarshan gave him an important message, "This is what being great means. You play so well that your moves come with your name written on it!" 

 

Another important member of Nihal’s team is his recent trainer and friend GM Srinath Narayanan. A former prodigy himself, Srinath now 24 years old, says:

“I first met Nihal Sarin in January 2016. I won comfortably, and it was hard to notice anything special at that time. Neither did a training session two months later show me anything extraordinary, other than a very enthusiastic little kid. The first spark was when, in June, he already outplayed me and had a clear winning position. I barely survived then, but the amount of improvement in just six months, mostly self-learned, caught my attention. Since then, I interact with him face to face about every quarter, and he never fails to astonish me with the number of new things he has learned in the intervening period and already internalized. He has an amazing intuition, not just for chess moves, but the way he trains, sees and interacts with chess, and the starting point for all this is boundless curiosity. He doesn’t follow the beaten path or accept things just because others say so but has the ability to think independently with remarkable clarity. Congratulations on the GM title, which may be merely the first step in a thousand-mile journey, but also one of the annoying distractions around in the career of a lot of players.”

Nihal Sarin with Srinath Narayanan

Nihal with his trainer and friend Srinath Narayanan | Photo: Nihal Sarin’s archives

In chess terms, Nihal has a positional feel which is far superior to any of the best talents that the chess world is currently witnessing. His technique of converting winning positions into a win is excellent. His recent games against GM Sundararajan Kidambi at the Kolkata GM International 2018 and Mircea Emilia Parligras at the Abu Dhabi Masters 2018 come to mind. In both the games Nihal was facing experienced grandmasters.

In the endgame of both games, he was a pawn up but the chances of the game tilting towards a draw were very high. But Nihal, with his immense level of stamina and energy, kept posing problems to his opponents until they broke down and lost. It’s usually the other way around that experienced players trick their younger opponents, but Nihal is simply an exception.

 

Nihal's post-game interview after beating Kidambi | ChessBase India Youtube

 

If you are a ChessBase Account Basic member you can watch Nihal's Endgame Magic Show with one of the best endgame experts in the world GM Karsten Mueller:

The first few minutes are always free

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Nihal Sarin discussing an endgame with Karsten Mueller

And that's how you draw this endgame! Nihal with GM Karsten Mueller

It is extremely difficult to say what Nihal will achieve in the years to come. His current level of play points towards World Championship material. A lot of top players including Vishy Anand have predicted a bright future for the young boy.  A lot of variables have to fall in place for Nihal to become the best in the world. But one thing is for sure, for the young boy it’s the journey that is more enjoyable and not the destination!


Links


Nihal Sarin's pledge to help Kerala

Currently, India is witnessing one of the worst natural calamities in decades. Floods in Kerala have rocked the state leaving over 350 people dead (the toll is rising daily) and nearly 2,00,000 people homeless. In a tweet, the Chief Minister of the state said that more than 314,000 people were now living in more than 2,000 emergency relief camps set up in the area. At last count, 357 people lost their lives, and the floods destroyed roughly 906,400 hectares worth of crops. The cost to the state and its people stands at a staggering Rs 19,512 crore. 2086 mm of rainfall has caused this flood.

Doing his bit, Nihal decided to help the victims of the flood by conducting a live show on the ChessBase India Youtube channel where he analyzed some of the best games with IM Sagar Shah. The analysis of his games will surely give you a peek into the mind of a future world-class player.

Nihal answered questions from viewers related to chess. His request to the chess community in India and all over the world is, "I hope that you will attend the show on 22nd of August and be able to enjoy my games and analysis. Please contribute generously towards the victims of Kerala floods. Your contribution matters."

The Live Show took place on the 22nd of August 2018 at 17:30 UTC

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Sagar is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
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DennisBrian DennisBrian 9/21/2018 01:06
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fgkdjlkag fgkdjlkag 8/23/2018 10:27
@Green22 and @RayLopez, I do not believe there are any rules prohibiting such motion during a game.

@rogeliogut, the reason there are so many problems in the world is because of bad government. 95% of problems have solutions already.
lolmaster64 lolmaster64 8/23/2018 09:00
Clearly, most people are forgetting that the author was talking about Nihal being restless when he was younger than he is now. Of course, pretty sure he is calmer and controlled player these days as anyone can see online on YouTube or in real tournaments. Also, he plays very strong! All the best.
RayLopez RayLopez 8/23/2018 06:58
Fluff piece as to be expected by this author, writing for Chessbase India readers. This tyke might not make it to the top 2700, as often happens with prodigies they burn out too fast. His antics of moving at the board, as another commentator said, have to be stopped (then again, Tal wore sunglasses, so maybe not). If this little guy puts his mind to it, I'm sure he'll find a cure for cancer, invent fusion, flying cars, etc etc etc and in the bargain play a decent chess game! :)
bachma1 bachma1 8/23/2018 04:20
This kid have equal chance to be the world chess champ like any other talents kids currently holding GM title. But his nerves of "restlessness" might bring harm to himself later; using too much energy early in life might result in his nervous breakdown. Enjoy chess!
rogeliogut rogeliogut 8/23/2018 03:52
I love chess and so I love seeing how new talents arrive to the scene, however, somehow I also feel those talents must not dedicate their entire lives to play chess, after all, chess is a game, and the world needs desperately our best talents to solve the most important problems, the world needs them. I would like to see those chess prodigies grow in chess but also build a career in sience, medicine, engineering, etc.
kingfisher99 kingfisher99 8/23/2018 11:34
Must say you are simply discouraging other kids of his age by praising Nihal and Pragg almost everyday.What is the need to do this?Both of them got sponsors at a very early stage of their career when they were not even 1700 and were about 9 years old or so.There are so many people who have a 2300+ elo but still bo not have sponsors.Is that not unfair?I am sure that if other kids also would have got money at such an early stage they also would have become like them.
SimonReinhard SimonReinhard 8/23/2018 09:49
I think the author tried a bit too hard to push for how great Nihal Sarin is. Let the facts speak for themselves seems better than writing a fluff piece that sounds more like a campaign commercial than a chess article.

Ultimately, such an approach leads to sentences like this: "In chess terms, Nihal has a positional feel which is far superior to any of the best talents that the chess world is currently witnessing." This is just preposterous hyperbole, in particular the "far superior" part, and close to insulting to all the other great young players at the moment. "... a positional feel ... far superior to any of the best talents ..."? Come on ...
jsaldea12 jsaldea12 8/23/2018 08:49
From what I know, this is critical times the world needs a savior. Gifted thered in chess, music, medicne, in religion...Expect many of them born, reborn, young as they are, they know shockingly of things ordinary persons canot grasp, take years to know but they know in instant! Nice to have them now..it means this is the time that needs them,
Aru Baba Aru Baba 8/23/2018 08:31
2 lakh is 200 thousand, 20 lakh is 2 million, 2 crore is 20 million, 20 crore is 200 million.
Marselos Marselos 8/23/2018 07:19
and when he will be a man
he will send every legend or myth to the toilet !
yesenadam yesenadam 8/23/2018 05:27
Great story as usual SS. One thing, bear in mind that most non-indian readers have no idea what a lakh or crore is; the rest of the world deals in thousands, millions, billions (US billions mostly, a thousand million). Even seeing "2,00,000" is confusing as it looks like a misprint for 2 million.
Green22 Green22 8/23/2018 02:59
Great talent for sure but that walking around and rocking back and forth out of his seat right in front of table will have to be stopped. Its very distracting for any opponent to see this in his/her vision as you're trying to concentrate.
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