European Championship Rd3: Speedy Gonzales or Swiss Gambit

by Elshan Moradiabadi
6/2/2017 – In an open tournament, the earlier rounds play as crucial role as the last rounds. Although, one can argue that every game has a point and one should remain focused and try to make the best of every round, we should accept that in a ‘giant swiss’, luck and turn of events play an important role in one’s result. The question becomes one of either giving a little to gain a lot, or trying to sprint ahead. Report and analysis by GM Elshan Moradiabadi.

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For players who are considered favorites or who hope to qualify for the World Cup, early rounds can help them to score the number of points they need so that they can enter a more relaxed phase of ‘Grandmaster draws’ in the middle of the tournament to save energy while consolidating their status in the standing.

Others who may have a rocky or even bad start could still hope to come back since the eleven-round event gives them enough room to win several games in a row and come back to the top of the table (if the earlier stumbles were due to a ‘hiccup’ and not just bad form). In this case, players may face less challenging pairings and they may turn their early bad results into what is known among chess players a ‘Swiss Gambit’ when the early bad result lets players play risky chess against weaker opposition and reach the top in the last few rounds.

However, most of the time these gambits turn into a dubious loss of points and instead place extra pressure on the players since the opposition they face afterward isn’t necessarily easy pickings, and certainly not enough to compensate for the early points they failed to score. Thus, the simplest rule is: let us win as much as we can and deal with difficult opponents when we face them!

It has become a common theme that chess belongs to very young players and one can only be a strong GM if he or she works at an early age and becomes a GM before 15 or 16 years of age. In such a no country for old men environment, the experienced GMs (so far!) have proven that 'those oldies are goodies'.

The leader of these GMs is none other than Armenian GM Artashes Minasian (2480). The Armenian , who has been a member of the national team in two important occasions , 2006 and 2008, where the national team won the Olympiad back-to-back, is a prolific and sharp player. The veteran GM has a very narrow repertoire (Fianchetto with either color almost all the time!) yet a long and successful career, most notably winning last the USSR championship which took place in a swiss format back in 1991!

In rounds two and three he managed to beat his 2600 GM opponents and snatch 3.0/3.

Artashes Minasian vs Mikheil Mchedlishvili

[Event "EICC 2017"] [Site "Minsk"] [Date "2017.05.31"] [Round "2"] [White "Minasian, Artashes"] [Black "Mchedlishvili, Mikheil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B46"] [WhiteElo "2480"] [BlackElo "2605"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi "] [PlyCount "101"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [EventCountry "BLR"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. e4 $1 {Minasian opts for 1.e4 but a sideline will ensue nevertheless! Minasian was never a theoretical player!} c5 {(26)} 2. Nc3 {(0)} e6 {( 02:38)} 3. f4 {(1:28) Minasian goes for GP attack.} Nc6 {(2:53)} 4. Nf3 {(10)} a6 { (1:28)} 5. d4 {(4:32) A change of heart! Minasian goes for the Open Sicilian main line. He must have been very inspired to play this style!} cxd4 {(40)} 6. Nxd4 {( 03)} Nxd4 {(52)} (6... Qc7 {is what is considered as the main line in this 'Sicilian Taimanov'.}) 7. Qxd4 {(5)} b5 {(41)} 8. Be3 {(5:03) A natural move played after some thought. White is planning to castle queenside.} Bb7 { (57)} 9. O-O-O {(51) A rare line with mixed results.} Rc8 {(01:29)} 10. Kb1 { (4:15)} (10. Be2 {is a natural move which was chosen by Israeli GM Ilja Smirin with good success.} Nf6 11. Bf3 Be7 (11... b4 {is probably the move to consider here.} 12. Na4 d5 13. exd5 Bxd5 14. Bxd5 Nxd5 15. f5 {with extreme complications.}) 12. e5 Bxf3 13. gxf3 Nh5 14. Ne4 {And White is already much better.} f5 15. exf6 Nxf6 16. Rhg1 Qc7 17. Rd2 O-O 18. Nxf6+ Bxf6 19. Qxd7 Qc4 20. Bd4 Rf7 21. Qd6 Qxa2 22. b3 Rd8 23. Rxg7+ Rxg7 24. Qxe6+ Rf7 25. Rg2+ Kf8 26. Bc5+ Be7 27. Bxe7+ {1-0 (27) Smirin,I (2663)-Rublevsky,S (2695) Khanty-Mansiysk 2013}) 10... Ne7 {(10:50) Typical, but I am not sure if it is sufficient for a balanced fight.} (10... Nf6 {was examined before by a young Ukrainian-American GM where things backfired after} 11. e5 Ng4 12. Ne4 Bd5 13. a3 Qa5 14. Bc1 b4 15. Nd6+ Bxd6 16. exd6 O-O 17. h3 bxa3 $2 (17... Nf6 18. Qxb4 Qxb4 19. axb4 Be4 20. Bd3 Bxg2 21. Rh2 Bf3 22. Rg1 Rc6 {and Black is fine.}) 18. Bd2 $1 Qc5 19. Qxc5 Rxc5 20. hxg4 Rb8 21. b4 Be4 22. Bd3 Bxd3 23. cxd3 a5 24. Rc1 Rd5 25. Rc3 axb4 26. Rb3 f5 27. g5 Rb6 28. Ka2 Rc5 29. Bxb4 Rc2+ 30. Ka1 Rxg2 31. Rc1 Kf7 32. Rc4 h5 33. gxh6 gxh6 34. Rxa3 Rg1+ {1-0 (34) Cuartas, J (2483)-Zherebukh,Y (2618) Montcada 2014}) 11. Be2 {( 19:21)} Nc6 {(6:48)} 12. Qb6 $1 {(6:08) Otherwise, Black's attack could become very annoying. White opts for some endgame where he has good pressure along the d-file.} Qxb6 { (4:03)} 13. Bxb6 {(5)} Bb4 {(4:03)} 14. Rd3 {(8:22)} Ne7 {(02:47)} (14... Bxc3 15. Rxc3 Ne7 {and Black is fine thanks to the tactics involving the bishop on b6.}) 15. Rhd1 {(5:10)} Bxc3 {(28:34)} 16. Rxd7 {(03:10) A tactical sequence starts which requires a lot of accuracy from both sides, but the ensuing forced position is approximately balanced.} Bd5 {(37)} 17. Rc7 $1 {(3:45) The only move.} Rxc7 {(6:16)} 18. Bxc7 {(25) Now the bishop on d5 is pinned to the d8 square.} Bb4 $6 {(6:11) This is a precious loss of tempo.} (18... Kd7 $1 19. Be5 (19. exd5 Kxc7 20. d6+ Kc6 21. dxe7 Bf6 {with a drawish endgame.}) 19... Bxe5 20. fxe5 Kc7 21. exd5 Nxd5 22. c4 Nf4 23. Bf1 b4 24. Rd6 Ra8 25. c5 Ng6 26. Bxa6 Rb8 27. Kc2 Nxe5 {with an equal position but it is far from drawn. It is funny, but this endgame is very similar to Fischer-Petrosian Bled 1961!}) 19. a3 {(6:43)} Bc5 {(5:51)} 20. Bf3 $1 {(2:27) An important move which reinforces White's bishop pair and his pressure along the center.} Kd7 {(2:45)} 21. Be5 {(06:26)} f6 {(45)} 22. Bc3 {(5)} Kc6 {(2:31)} 23. exd5+ {(10)} exd5 { (3)} 24. Re1 {(3:52)} Bd6 {(1:31)} 25. g3 {(1:15)} Rd8 {(2:17)} 26. b3 {(05:24) } Kd7 {(48)} 27. Kb2 {(2:16)} Rc8 {( 15)} 28. b4 $1 {(3:16) Fixing the queenside. The position is far from lost but Minasian is pushing his opponent to the edge.} Rf8 {(1:19)} 29. Kb3 {(26)} Rc8 {(2:54)} 30. Ra1 $1 {(3:12) Minasian gradually follows his plan. He is going to undermine Black's queenside which soon would become very vulnerable.} Rc4 {(1:39)} 31. a4 {( 24)} g5 $1 {(28) the best way to make things muddy!} 32. axb5 {(34)} axb5 {(1)} 33. Ra7+ {(2:30)} Ke6 {(38)} 34. fxg5 {(1:12)} fxg5 {(02)} (34... Nc6 $3 35. Rxh7 d4 36. Be1 Bxb4 37. Bxb4 Rxb4+ 38. Ka2 Ne5 {would have given Black excellent drawing chances!}) 35. Be2 {(21)} Nc6 {(1:25)} 36. Rxh7 {(12)} Nd4+ {(21)} 37. Bxd4 {(6)} Rxd4 {( 01)} 38. c3 {(12)} Rd2 {(8)} 39. Rh6+ {(3:34)} Ke7 {(56)} 40. Bxb5 {(0)} Be5 {(10)} 41. Ba6 {(10:20)} Rf2 {(4:48)} 42. Bb7 {(2:15) Good enough. Minasian plays with patience and care.} Rd2 {(2:09)} 43. Bc8 {(5:16)} Kd8 {(1:49)} 44. Bf5 {(56)} Rf2 {(1:48)} 45. Bg4 {(10)} Rf7 {(7:43)} 46. Re6 { (02:09)} Re7 {(3:07)} 47. Kc2 $1 {(1:15) Classy! Black had his rook tied to the exchange of pieces which is unfavorable for him. In the meantime Minasian brings his king to the game!} Ke8 {(3:09)} 48. Kd3 {(1:21)} Kf7 {(7)} 49. Rc6 { (55)} Bf6 {(1:05)} 50. b5 {(2:38)} Rb7 {(2:20)} 51. Rc5 {(35) White is going to win the next pawn and the game is completely won so the Georgian strong GM throws in the towel. Minasian once more showed that his experience and knowledge of chess is beyond the Elo number tied to his name in FIDE rating list.} 1-0

If a score of 3.0/3 by Minasian is indeed fascinating, then it should be noted that 68 year-old Yuri Balashov’s 1.5/3 against a 2625 average is no less impressive. Here we see how he won a complex endgame against strong Polish GM and ex-winner of the Aeroflot Open, Mateuz Bartel.

Mateusz Bartel vs Yuri Balashov

[Event "EICC 2017"] [Site "Minsk"] [Date "2017.05.31"] [Round "2"] [White "Bartel, Mateusz"] [Black "Balashov, Yuri S"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2637"] [BlackElo "2408"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi "] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [EventCountry "BLR"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. e4 {(0)} c5 {(18)} 2. Nf3 {(0)} Nc6 {(20)} 3. Bb5 {(0)} g6 {(16)} 4. O-O { ( 00)} Bg7 {(6)} 5. Nc3 {(6)} d6 {(52)} 6. e5 {(37)} dxe5 {(51)} 7. Bxc6+ {(12) } bxc6 {( 06)} 8. Re1 {(7)} f6 {(1:57)} 9. b3 {(2:05)} Nh6 {(1:03)} 10. Ba3 { (12:35)} Qa5 {(2:13)} 11. Na4 {(02:29)} c4 {(1:01)} 12. d4 {(59)} cxd3 {( 13)} 13. cxd3 {(1:01)} Bg4 {(1:32)} 14. h3 {(13:43)} Bxf3 {(50)} 15. Qxf3 {(6)} Qd5 {(17)} 16. Qe4 {(01:55)} Nf5 {(6:04)} 17. Rac1 {(1:22)} Nd4 {(5:10)} 18. Bb2 { (5:08)} Qxe4 {(5:53)} 19. Rxe4 {(3:12)} f5 {(4:57)} 20. Ree1 {(6)} Rd8 {(2:02)} 21. Rc4 {(06:50)} Rf8 {(8:27)} 22. Nc5 {(4:25)} Kf7 {( 29)} 23. Kf1 {(3:24)} Rfe8 {(8:13)} 24. Nb7 {(3:36)} Rd7 {(2:41)} 25. Na5 {[#] (1:48) In a complex endgame Balashov finds a nice sacrifice which hands him a strong initiative in this endgame.} c5 $1 {(7:49)} 26. Rxc5 {(03:30)} (26. Bxd4 Rxd4 {and only now} 27. Rxc5) 26... Ne6 {(24)} 27. Rb5 {(2:12)} Nf4 {(45) This knight is a monster. } 28. Bxe5 {(13:42)} Nxd3 {(37)} 29. Bxg7 {(4)} Nxe1 {(22)} 30. Bc3 {(4)} Nd3 { (30)} 31. Nc4 {(04)} Rc8 {(3:13)} 32. g3 {(49)} Ke8 {(1:57)} 33. Kg2 {(1:41)} Nc5 {(2:22)} 34. g4 {(5:32)} Rb7 $1 {(1:36) Gradually but assuredly Balashov secures a winning endgame.} 35. Rxb7 {(1:19)} Nxb7 {(6)} 36. Bd4 {(59)} a6 { (2:08)} 37. Kf3 {(19)} Nd8 {( 33)} 38. Ke3 {(2:47)} Ne6 {(14)} 39. Bc3 {(27)} Rd8 {(1:06)} 40. Bd2 {(0)} fxg4 $1 {(1:42) Balashov goes for a far passed-pawn! A good technical feat!} 41. hxg4 {(20)} h5 {(5)} 42. gxh5 {(5)} gxh5 {( 07)} 43. Kf3 {(9)} Kf7 {(1:08)} 44. Kg3 {(19)} Kg6 {(28)} 45. Bb4 {(24) } Rd3+ {(1:04)} 46. f3 {(50)} Kf6 {(12)} 47. Ba3 {(31)} Nd4 {( 56)} 48. Kf4 { (26)} Nf5 {(4:58)} 49. Bb2+ {(51)} Ke6 {(7)} 50. Be5 {(4:01)} h4 {(1:10)} 51. Kg4 {(29)} Ne3+ $1 {(26) The last piece of complexity (knights) are off the board: Balashov is on autopilot now! White resigned!} 0-1

Experience does not come always handy though. Polish-GM and ex-European champion Barlomiej Macieja had a difficult third round game against young Russian GM Sanan Sjugirov. In what seemed like a benign endgame the Polish player got into ‘any move’ mode and started to make one mistake after another and ended up losing an instructive endgame.

Bartolomiej Macieja vs Sanan Sjugirov

[Event "EICC 2017"] [Site "Minsk"] [Date "2017.06.01"] [Round "3"] [White "Macieja, Bartlomiej"] [Black "Sjugirov, Sanan"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2530"] [BlackElo "2654"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "126"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [EventCountry "BLR"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. c4 {(0)} Nf6 {(3:26)} 2. Nc3 {(0)} e5 {(45)} 3. Nf3 {(0)} Nc6 {(18)} 4. g3 { ( 00)} Bb4 {(10:38)} 5. Nd5 {(9:21)} Nxd5 {(22:03)} 6. cxd5 {(4)} Nd4 {(6)} 7. Nxd4 {(16:05)} exd4 {( 06)} 8. Bg2 {(7)} O-O {(40)} 9. O-O {(4)} d6 {(7:53)} 10. a3 {(10:38)} Bc5 {(25)} 11. b4 {( 01)} Bb6 {(7)} 12. e3 {(25)} dxe3 {(8:15) } 13. dxe3 {(4:00)} Qf6 {(1:34)} 14. Bd2 {(10:04)} a5 {(10:19)} 15. a4 {(17:21) } axb4 {(11:37)} 16. Bxb4 {(02)} Ba5 {(35)} 17. Qb3 {(5:56)} Bxb4 {(2:13)} 18. Qxb4 {(2)} b6 {(25)} 19. a5 {(10:28)} Bf5 {(1:14)} 20. Ra3 {(9:50)} bxa5 { (1:52)} 21. Rxa5 {(10)} Rab8 {(3)} 22. Qf4 {(3:52)} g5 {(5:05)} 23. Qf3 {(1)} Qe5 {(24)} 24. Ra7 {(57)} Rb4 {(26)} 25. Qd1 {(2:13)} Rc4 {(1:58)} 26. Qa1 { (12)} Qxa1 {(5:29)} 27. Raxa1 {(29)} Rb8 {( 10)} 28. Rfc1 {(11)} Rbb4 {(8)} 29. Bf1 {(32]} Rxc1 {(20)} 30. Rxc1 {(0)} g4 {(1:56)} 31. Bc4 $4 {(01:30) This is a serious waste of time.} (31. h3 $1 gxh3 (31... h5 32. h4 Rb1 33. Rxb1 Bxb1 34. Bg2 Kg7 35. f4 gxf3 36. Bxf3 {And now White has h5 as a target in exchange for his d5 pawn.}) 32. f3 {followed by e4 would secure draw for white as all of white's pawns are finally unified!}) 31... Kg7 $2 {(15) this gives White an excellent chance.} 32. Ba6 $2 {(51) But Macieja does not manage to take advantage of it.} (32. h3 h5 33. Be2 Kh6 34. hxg4 hxg4 35. Rxc7 Rb1+ 36. Kg2 Be4+ 37. f3 gxf3+ 38. Bxf3 Rb2+ 39. Kg1 Bxf3 40. Rxf7 Bg2 41. Rf6+ Kg5 42. Rxd6 Kg4 43. e4 Bxe4 44. Rf6 Kxg3 45. Kf1 {and table base claims that this is a draw!}) 32... Kf6 {( 15)} 33. Kf1 {(24)} Rb6 {(53)} 34. Bc4 {(27)} Ke5 {(15)} ( 34... c5 35. dxc6 Rxc6 {is surprisingly winning!} 36. Ke1 d5) 35. Ke1 {(21)} Rb1 $1 {(4:52) Black wins the d5 pawn, and the game!} 36. Rxb1 {(02)} Bxb1 {(5) } 37. Be2 {(10)} f5 {( 50)} 38. Bf1 {(1:14)} Kxd5 {(24)} 39. Kd2 {(6)} Ke5 { (48)} 40. Kc3 {(0)} c5 {(16)} 41. h3 {(25:15)} Be4 {(6:42)} 42. Kc4 {(2:59)} Bd5+ {(2:26)} 43. Kc3 {(10)} Bf3 {(24)} 44. Kc4 {(40)} Be4 {(1:08)} 45. h4 { (3:40)} Bf3 {(31)} 46. Bd3 {( 22)} Bd5+ {(6)} 47. Kc3 {(13)} Be4 {(5)} 48. Bf1 {(49)} d5 {(8)} 49. Be2 {(10)} h6 {( 02:22)} 50. Bd1 {(23)} c4 {(8:29)} 51. Be2 {(22)} Bf3 {(22)} 52. Bf1 {(43)} Kd6 {(19)} 53. Kb4 {(29)} Kc6 {(6)} 54. Kc3 { (39)} Kc5 {( 13)} 55. Kc2 {(12)} Kb4 {(21)} 56. Kb2 {(2)} Ka4 {(5:51)} 57. Ka2 {(9)} Ka5 {(2:19)} 58. Ka1 {(09)} Kb4 {(42)} 59. Kb2 {(2)} h5 {(1:31)} 60. Kc2 {(2:20)} Ka3 {(5)} 61. Kc3 {(1:10)} Ka2 {(5)} 62. Kc2 {(1:18)} Be4+ {(13)} 63. Kc1 {(29)} Kb3 {(8)} 0-1

Baadur Jobava vs Alexey Sarana

[Event "EICC 2017"] [Site "Minsk"] [Date "2017.06.01"] [Round "3"] [White "Jobava, Baadur"] [Black "Sarana, Alexey"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B94"] [WhiteElo "2713"] [BlackElo "2472"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] [EventCountry "BLR"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. e4 {(1:41)} c5 {(12)} 2. Nf3 {(12)} d6 {( 11)} 3. d4 {(8)} cxd4 {(6)} 4. Nxd4 {(4)} Nf6 {(12)} 5. Nc3 {(6)} a6 {(6)} 6. Bg5 {(05)} Nbd7 {(25)} 7. Qe2 { (14)} h6 {( 19)} 8. Bxf6 {(6)} Nxf6 {(28)} 9. O-O-O {(10)} e5 {(27)} 10. Nf5 { (29)} g6 {(10)} 11. Ne3 {(10)} Be6 {(8)} 12. Kb1 {(3:36)} Rc8 {(10:28)} 13. Ned5 {(35)} Bg7 {(2:14)} 14. h4 {(42)} h5 {(4:18)} 15. g3 {(34)} Nxd5 {(5:17)} 16. Nxd5 {(28)} Rc5 {(1:29)} 17. Ne3 {(1:32)} Qd7 {(12:15)} 18. Qd3 {(57)} Rc6 {(3:02)} 19. Be2 {(3:33)} f5 {(11:40)} 20. Bf3 {(1:51)} Rb6 {(5:17)} 21. b3 { ( 02:45)} O-O {(5:04)} 22. exf5 {(5:59)} gxf5 {(2:24)} 23. Bd5 {(38)} e4 { (1:43)} 24. Qc4 {(33)} Bf7 {(11)} 25. a4 {(4:59)} Kh7 {(4:18)} 26. Bxf7 { ( 08:11)} Rxf7 {[#] (26) Jobava has definitely a big gambit. After losing his second round game, the 2700 Georgian, known for his flamboyant style has a very good position in the third round. Unfortunately for him, he does not pay enough attention to his king when it is needed.} 27. Ka2 $2 {(1:21)} (27. Rd5 Qe6 (27... Rc6 28. Qe2 Kg6 29. Rhd1 {with a winning attack.}) 28. Rxf5 Qxc4 29. Rxh5+ Kg8 30. Nxc4 Rc6 31. Rf1 b5 32. Nd2 {should be winning.}) 27... Rf8 { (8:59)} (27... Rc6 28. Qe2 b5 {was definitely better.}) 28. Rd5 $2 {(1:39) Losing?} (28. Qe2 {is safer}) 28... Rc8 {(1:52)} 29. Qe2 {(1:29)} Rb4 {(01:29)} 30. Ra5 $4 {(2:52) This loses by force.} (30. Qxh5+ {does not seem to save black either.} Kg8 31. Ka3 Rxa4+ 32. bxa4 Rc3+ 33. Kb2 Rxe3+ 34. Kc1 Ra3 35. Rhd1 Qe6 36. Qxf5 Qxf5 37. Rxf5 Bc3) (30. Ka3 Rxa4+ 31. bxa4 Rc3+ 32. Kb4 Qc6 33. a5 {seems just like a draw.} Rxe3 34. fxe3 Qc3+ 35. Ka4 Qc6+ 36. Ka3 Qc3+) 30... Rc5 {(2:09) Mate is unavoidable now.} 31. Ka3 {( 55)} Rxa5 {(2:19)} 32. Kxb4 {(12)} Qc6 {(17)} 33. Qc4 {(1:11)} (33. Qc4 Rxa4+ 34. bxa4 Qb6+ {and White has to lose the queen to prevent checkmate in one.}) 0-1

Standings after three rounds

Rk SNo   Name Fed Rtg Pts rtg+/-
1 14 GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2690 3,0 7,3
2 16 GM Cheparinov Ivan ECX 2688 3,0 7,3
3 79 GM Fridman Daniel GER 2605 3,0 9,4
  103 GM Azarov Sergei BLR 2582 3,0 10,1
  183 GM Minasian Artashes ARM 2480 3,0 11,3
6 10 GM Rodshtein Maxim ISR 2698 3,0 7,4
7 52 GM Kuzubov Yuriy UKR 2637 3,0 11,4
8 96 GM Ponkratov Pavel RUS 2590 3,0 7,2
9 109 GM Bocharov Dmitry RUS 2574 3,0 9,7
10 45 GM Zhigalko Sergei BLR 2643 2,5 8,2
11 19 GM Artemiev Vladislav RUS 2682 2,5 -2,3
  31 GM Dubov Daniil RUS 2660 2,5 3,4
  43 GM Sutovsky Emil ISR 2646 2,5 -1,9
  57 GM Lupulescu Constantin ROU 2631 2,5 2,9
  73 GM Hracek Zbynek CZE 2612 2,5 1,1
16 83 GM Bosiocic Marin CRO 2603 2,5 8,2
  87 GM Bok Benjamin NED 2598 2,5 7,5
18 9 GM Naiditsch Arkadij AZE 2700 2,5 7,4
  59 GM Demchenko Anton RUS 2629 2,5 6,6
20 34 GM Kovalenko Igor LAT 2657 2,5 3,1

Click for complete standings

Links

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Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess. is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching.
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