ETCC R06: Things heating up in Reykjavik

by Sagar Shah
11/19/2015 – The most important match in the women’s section between Russia and Ukraine was drawn 2:2, and the Russian women team continues to lead by a full point. In the open section Russia beat Georgia and leads with 11.0/12 match points. France beat Ukraine and are in the sole second spot. Good news for Carlsen fans: he beat Leko with black. Extensive analysis, pictures and videos.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

Watch it live on Playchess!

ETCC R06: Things heating up in Reykjavik

In all our previous reports on the European Team Championships we covered the Open section first and only then wrote about the women tournament. Today we break the ritual and give you a detailed account about what happened in the top board clash in the women’s section between Russia and Ukraine. This was perhaps the most crucial match of the entire tournament. The Russian women’s team had been leading the event with a perfect 10.0/10. Close on their heels were the Ukrainian and Georgian teams with 8.0/10. Russia had already defeated Georgia in the fourth round. If there was any team who could have stopped the Russians it had to be the Ukrainians. This is how the pairing looked:

The World Champion played a flawless game to demolish Alexandra Kosteniuk

Mariya Muzychuk came to the board in a fighting mood. This was clearly shown as she essayed the Trompowsky. The aggressive position soon resulted in a complicated queenless middlegame.

Mariya Muzychuk – Alexandra Kosteniuk, round six

Black is very close to equality but only one move can help her achieve that. Can you find it?

In the above position, Alexandra had to play 13…g5! That would solved all her opening problems as the e5 pawn would be left weak. Instead she chose 13…Ke7?! From here on the Ukrainian wove her magic, and she did it so precisely that Kosteniuk was left wondering where exactly she went wrong! Going over the game would also help you to learn how to make use of your king as a fighting piece in the late middlegame/early endgame.

[Event "20th European Teams Women"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.11.19"] [Round "6.1"] [White "Muzychuk, Mariya"] [Black "Kosteniuk, Alexandra"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A45"] [WhiteElo "2542"] [BlackElo "2534"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "91"] [EventDate "2015.11.13"] [WhiteTeam "Ukraine"] [BlackTeam "Russia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "UKR"] [BlackTeamCountry "RUS"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 $5 {Mariya Muzychuk shows her intentions right from the start. She is going for the kill with the Trompowsky.} e6 3. e4 h6 4. Bxf6 Qxf6 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. e5 (6. Qd2 {is the main line.}) 6... Qe7 7. Qd3 {All that the Ukrainian wanted was an original game. Now she has it. This position has only been played twice.} b6 8. O-O-O Bb7 9. f4 Bxc3 10. Qxc3 c5 11. dxc5 Qxc5 12. Qxc5 bxc5 {How can we assess this position? At first sight it looks favourable for White as she has more space and her rook is already on the semi open file putting pressure on d7. But on closer inspection you realize that the bishop on b7 is superbly placed and the king will be ideal on e7. All in all it's a well balanced position where the better player will win.} 13. Ne2 Ke7 (13... g5 $1 {would have given a great position to Kosteniuk.}) 14. Nc3 g5 15. f5 $1 { Fantastic play by Muzychuk. She is extremely alert and takes her chance.} exf5 (15... Nc6 16. f6+ Kd8 17. Re1 $14 {is very uncomfortable for Black. The pawn on f6 is a real thorn in the side.}) 16. Nd5+ Kd8 (16... Ke6 17. Bc4 $18) ( 16... Bxd5 17. Rxd5 Nc6 18. Rxc5 $16 {is clearly a favourable position for White with the bishop coming to d3.}) 17. Nf6 Kc8 18. h4 $1 {Black is thoroughly uncoordinated and Mariya takes full advantage of it, opening the position from all sides.} g4 19. Rd2 {Defending g2 so that the bishop on f1 can develop.} Nc6 20. Nxd7 (20. Rxd7 $1 Nxe5 21. Re7 Ng6 22. Rxf7 Nf4 23. Bc4 Bxg2 24. Re1 $18) 20... Rd8 21. Nxc5 Rxd2 22. Kxd2 Nxe5 {Somehow it seems to me that the move sequence starting with Nxd7 has given Black some counterplay although White is clearly in the driver's seat due to her active king.} 23. Ke3 Bc6 24. Kf4 {The king single handedly marches on and takes on the black army.} f6 25. Kxf5 Kc7 26. b4 Bd5 27. Rg1 Bxa2 28. Kxf6 {White is a pawn up and with such an active king well and truly on her way to victory.} Nc6 29. c3 Rf8+ 30. Kg7 Rg8+ 31. Kh7 (31. Kxh6 {was also possible.} Ne5 32. Bd3 $18) 31... Ne5 32. Bd3 Rd8 33. Bf5 Rd2 34. Re1 Nc6 35. Re8 h5 (35... Rxg2 36. Rc8+ Kd6 37. Be4 $18 ) 36. Kh6 Rd6+ 37. Kg5 Rd5 38. Kf4 Rd8 39. Rxd8 Nxd8 40. Bg6 Bd5 41. g3 Kb6 42. Bxh5 a5 43. Bxg4 Kb5 44. Be2+ Bc4 45. Bxc4+ Kxc4 46. h5 {A very fine victory for Mariya, who played like a World Champion!} 1-0

With Kosteniuk’s loss, Russians were in trouble…

….but Kateryna Lagno made sure that the Ukrainians didn’t
run away with the match, by beating Anna Muzychuk

The game began with the Panov Botvinnik attack in the Caro Kann. It seemed like Anna with the black pieces had equalized out of the opening, but she still had to solve some micro problems. A crucial position was reached after White’s 21st move.

Kateryna Lagno – Anna Muzychuk, round six

This is an excellent position for training your prophylactic thinking. It’s Black to play.

If Anna had asked herself the question: what exactly is my opponent threatening here, she would have realized that it is the move c4-c5!, putting a lot of pressure on Black’s position. Hence it was imperative to break with 21…e5! Instead she played the toothless 21…g6?! and after 22.c5! White already had a huge advantage.

[Event "20th European Teams Women"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.11.19"] [Round "6.2"] [White "Lagno, Kateryna"] [Black "Muzychuk, Anna"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B13"] [WhiteElo "2523"] [BlackElo "2534"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2015.11.13"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Ukraine"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "UKR"] 1. c4 c6 2. e4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nf3 Bg4 {This is one of the main positions in the Panov Botvinnik Variation of the Caro Kann. Nearly 3800 games have been played here. But now Kosteniuk chooses a move that has only been played in eight games!} 7. Bg5 {The main game in which this was played was in Aronian-Grischuk in Sinquefield Cup.} Ne4 8. Be3 (8. cxd5 Nxg5 9. dxc6 bxc6 10. Be2 Nxf3+ 11. Bxf3 Bxf3 12. Qxf3 Rc8 $11 {leads to a round about equal position.}) 8... e6 9. cxd5 Nxc3 10. bxc3 Qxd5 11. Be2 Be7 12. O-O O-O { This position looks to have arisen out of the c3 Sicilian more than the Caro Kann.} 13. h3 Bxf3 $6 {A pretty dubious decision giving up the two bishops. After this White has a clear edge.} (13... Bf5 $11) 14. Bxf3 $14 Qd7 15. Qa4 Rfd8 16. Rab1 Ne5 $5 17. Bd1 $1 Nc6 18. Qb5 b6 19. Ba4 {White has definite pressure here.} Rac8 20. c4 Qc7 {Threatening the d4 pawn.} 21. Rfd1 g6 $6 { If Anna would have asked herself what is my opponent's plan she would have realized that it is highly imperative to do something against c4-c5.} (21... e5 $1 22. d5 Nd4 23. Bxd4 exd4 24. Rxd4 Qe5 $44 {White might be slightle better but Black has excellent compensation on the dark squares.}) 22. c5 $1 $16 { Lagno is alert and takes her chance. This is a strong move trying to get the rooks into the game.} bxc5 23. dxc5 Rd5 (23... Rxd1+ 24. Rxd1 Bf8 25. g3 $16 { Black is tied down while White can slowly improve her position.}) 24. Qa6 Nb8 25. Qb7 Rxd1+ 26. Bxd1 Nd7 27. c6 Nc5 (27... Qxc6 28. Qxc6 Rxc6 29. Rb7 Rd6 30. Ba4 $18) 28. Qxc7 Rxc7 29. Bf3 $18 {The two bishops combined with the c-pawn are a winning force. It is surprising how everything went downhill for Anna in a matter of few moves.} Bd6 30. Rd1 Be7 31. Bf4 Rc8 32. c7 Bf6 33. Rb1 1-0

Natalia Zhukova won her game against Valentina Gunina with absolute ease on the third board

Zhukova would not have expected to beat one of the strongest players in the women chess so effortlessly. For Gunina things started to spiral downwards right out of the opening.

Natalia Zhukova – Valentina Gunina, round six

This is a very common position in the e3 Queen’s Indian.
It’s Black to move. What is wrong with the natural 7…0-0?!

Recently in the European Club Cup, the same position was reached between Vladimir Kramnik versus Veselin Topalov. Of course, Topalov knew that it was important to play 7…cxd4 8.exd4 d5! Although he lost that game it had nothing to do with the opening. Gunina instead played 7…0-0. This meant that Zhukova could push on with 8.d5! and Black got a very bad verison of the Benoni. The rest of the game was perfect milking of the opening advantage by Zhukova. She never really went wrong and brought home the advantage with smooth play.

[Event "20th European Teams Women"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.11.19"] [Round "6.3"] [White "Zhukova, Natalia"] [Black "Gunina, Valentina"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A46"] [WhiteElo "2480"] [BlackElo "2516"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2015.11.13"] [WhiteTeam "Ukraine"] [BlackTeam "Russia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "UKR"] [BlackTeamCountry "RUS"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. e3 {Just like Mariya, Zhukova also doesn't want to indulge in hard core theory. Instead she goes for this simple line which is complex and interesting.} b6 4. Bd3 Bb7 5. O-O c5 6. c4 {Following the footsteps of Kramnik. He played the same line against Topalov in the European Club Cup.} Be7 7. Nc3 O-O $6 {It is well known that this is an error and gives White quite a tangible advantage after d5.} (7... cxd4 8. exd4 d5 {is the main line.}) 8. d5 $1 exd5 9. cxd5 d6 (9... Nxd5 10. Nxd5 Bxd5 11. Bxh7+ Kxh7 12. Qxd5 $16) 10. e4 a6 11. a4 Nbd7 12. h3 Re8 13. Bf4 Nf8 14. Nd2 Ng6 15. Bh2 Nd7 16. f4 Bf6 17. Kh1 Bd4 18. Nc4 Nf6 19. Qb3 {White has a great amount of pressure on the position. b6 is weak, the bishop on b7 is passive and the knights on f6 and g6 hardly have any scope. Additionally White has excellent centre control. Naturally Black must do something and she decided to give up her strong bishop on d4.} Bxc3 20. bxc3 Nxe4 (20... Rxe4 21. Bxe4 Nxe4 { was an interesting exchange sac, but after} 22. Nxb6 $16 {White is better.}) 21. f5 Bxd5 (21... Nf8 22. Bxe4 Rxe4 23. Nxd6 Re7 24. f6 $1 $18) 22. fxg6 hxg6 {The nature of position has changed drastically. Black has three pawns for the piece, but clearly in a bad position as the pawns are weak.} 23. Qb2 Qh4 24. Bxe4 Rxe4 25. Nxb6 (25. Nxd6 {was also strong.}) 25... Rb8 26. Qd2 Bc6 27. a5 Rbe8 28. Qxd6 R8e6 29. Qb8+ Kh7 30. Qg3 Qh5 31. c4 g5 32. Rae1 f5 33. Nd5 f4 34. Qd3 Qg6 35. Rxe4 Rxe4 36. Bg1 Bd7 37. Nc3 (37. Nf6+ gxf6 38. Qxd7+ Kg8 39. Rb1 $18) 37... Bf5 {Of course this is desperation. But the position was already lost.} 38. Nxe4 Bxe4 39. Qc3 Qc6 40. Rf2 Qh6 41. Re2 Bf5 42. Qe5 Qg6 ( 42... Bxh3 43. gxh3 Qxh3+ 44. Rh2 $18) 43. Bxc5 g4 44. Bd4 gxh3 45. gxh3 Bxh3 46. Rh2 Qc6+ 47. Qd5 Qh6 48. Qf3 {Gunina played quite a bad game, but all credit to Zhukova who took full advantage of her every error.} 1-0

If the Ukrainians managed to get a half point in the last board encounter between Alexandra Goryachkina and Anna Ushenina they would have won the match. However the young and talented Russian women’s Champion would not cooperate.

Alexandra Goryachkina won her game and ensured that the match was tied 2:2

The opening was a slow Slav. It was just the kind of positions that Goryachkina loves to play – slow and positional game with the opportunity to change gears at any moment. After the opening Black (Ushenina) had a solid but passive position. The players kept moving their pieces here and there for some time, but at the right moment Goryachkina pushed her pawn b4-b5. Ushenina seemed mentally unprepared for this breakthrough, played poorly and lost the game.

[Event "20th European Teams Women"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.11.19"] [Round "6.4"] [White "Goryachkina, Aleksandra"] [Black "Ushenina, Anna"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D10"] [WhiteElo "2478"] [BlackElo "2438"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2015.11.13"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Ukraine"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "UKR"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. e3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bf5 5. Nf3 a6 6. Bd3 Bxd3 7. Qxd3 e6 8. O-O Bb4 9. Bd2 O-O 10. Rfd1 (10. Nxd5 {doesn't work so well because of} Nxd5 11. cxd5 Bxd2 12. Qxd2 exd5 $11 {Black has no problems.}) 10... Ba5 (10... Nbd7 { is bad now because of} 11. Nxd5 $1 Nxd5 12. cxd5 Bxd2 13. dxe6 $1 fxe6 14. Rxd2 $16) 11. a4 Nbd7 12. b4 Bc7 (12... Bxb4 13. Nxd5 $1 $14) 13. e4 dxe4 14. Nxe4 Nxe4 15. Qxe4 {Of course White is slightly better due to the additional space. It is difficult for Black to neutralize this.} h6 16. a5 Nf6 17. Qe2 Qd6 18. g3 Rfd8 19. Bc3 (19. Bf4 Qe7 20. Bxc7 Qxc7 21. Kg2 $14 {was another way to go. But in general you would like to avoid exchanges when you have more space. That explains Aleksandra's decision to retain the bishops.}) 19... Qe7 20. Ne5 Nd7 21. Nd3 $1 {No exchanges!} Qg5 22. Qe4 Nf6 23. Qg2 Rab8 24. Re1 Qf5 25. Rad1 Ne8 26. Nc5 {White hasn't done anything concrete, yet she holds a nagging edge mainly because of the space advantage.} Qh5 27. b5 $5 {Goryachkina changes the character of the position quite quickly. Usually after few moves of quiet manoeuvring it is difficult to adjust yourself to concrete play.} axb5 28. cxb5 cxb5 29. Nxb7 Rd5 30. a6 Nd6 (30... Ra8 {would have been better.}) 31. Ba5 $1 Bxa5 32. Nxa5 Qg4 $2 (32... Ra8 33. Nc6 Rxa6 34. Ne7+ Kh7 35. Nxd5 exd5 $16 {This should be a clear advantage to White, but Black still has some fighting chances.}) 33. Nc6 Re8 34. a7 Kf8 35. Nb8 {One wouldn't have expected the game to end so soon. But Ushenina just couldn't adjust herself to concrete play after her opponent broke with b4-b5.} 1-0

The tense and well balanced match ended in a draw. This means that the Russians keep their lead with a score of 11.0/12 match points. The Georgia team was able to win their match against France 2.5:1.5. They are now in the sole second spot with 10.0/12. But it looks highly unlikely that they would be able to catch Russia, now that the Russian team has played with almost all the strong opponents. By that same logic Georgia too seems to be the favourite to win silver and Ukraine will in all probability crush all the competition to win bronze. Anything can happen in these last three rounds, but there is good probability that things will pan out exactly as mentioned above.

Team pairings and results of round six

No. Sd Team
Pts.
MP
Res.
:
Res.
MP
Pts.
Team Sd
1 3 Ukraine
14
8
2
:
2
10
15½
Russia 2
2 1 Georgia
11½
8
:
7
13
France 5
3 12 Serbia
13
7
2
:
2
7
10½
Romania 8
4 9 Hungary
11
7
:
7
12½
Germany 7
5 13 Azerbaijan
12
6
:
6
12
Poland 4
6 19 Austria
11
6
:
6
10
Czech Republic 16
7 11 Spain
11
5
:
5
Armenia 6
8 17 Greece
10½
5
:
5
10½
Netherlands 10
9 14 Turkey
10½
5
:
½
5
9
Switzerland 24
10 15 Italy
10
4
3
:
1
4
10½
Latvia 21
11 29 Iceland
4
0
:
4
4
11
England 18
12 25 Lithuania
9
3
3
:
1
3
8
Denmark 26
13 20 Slovenia
8
3
3
:
1
3
Belgium 28
14 23 Norway
2
:
3
6
Montenegro 22
15 27 Sweden
6
2
3
:
1
0
2
Finland 30

Full board results of round six + Rankings

Open Section

In the open section things are much more unpredictable as there are a lot of strong teams in the fray. Russia, however, seems untouchable as they defeated Georgia with a margin of 2.5:1.5. It was an exciting match with both sides exchanging punches. The top board clash between two good friends Baadur Jobava and Alexander Grischuk ended in a draw.

Baadur Jobava – Alexander Grischuk, round six

The above position arising out of the English Opening is quite a common one with
30 games played on it. However, we can always bank on Baadur to find a new move!

Baadur played the logical 9.Bf4!? and it turned out to be a novelty. It didn’t change the character of the position by much and the game ended in a draw after some more moves.

Novelties are a very common occurrence in Jobava’s games!

This was the only peaceful game of the match. On the second board Evgeny Tomashevsky once again proved what a fantastic attacker he is by beating Mikheil Mchedlishvili. Tomashevsky has recently played many such attacking games which are of great instructive value and worth going over. What he usually does is the following: play openings where he can build a strong center, get his knight on a central square, push a kingside pawn (most of the times h2-h4), swing the rook over via a rook lift, let the queen join in, and now for the difficult part: calculate all the variations accurately and closes off the game!

[Event "20th European Teams"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.11.19"] [Round "6.2"] [White "Tomashevsky, Evgeny"] [Black "Mchedlishvili, Mikheil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D16"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2618"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2015.11.13"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Georgia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "GEO"] 1. c4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 e6 6. e3 c5 7. Bxc4 Nc6 8. O-O cxd4 9. exd4 Be7 10. Qe2 O-O 11. Rd1 Nb4 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. Ne4 b6 15. Ne5 {Step one: Knight in the center.} Bh4 16. Ra3 {Step two: Rook lift!} Bb7 17. Rh3 Bd5 18. Nc3 Bxc4 19. Qxc4 Be7 20. Qe2 Rc8 21. Qg4 {Step three: Queen joins in.} Kh7 22. Rg3 Bf6 23. Ne4 Rc7 24. h4 {Step four: A pawn builds up the attack.} Qe7 25. Kh2 Nd5 26. Nxf6+ Qxf6 27. Rdd3 Ne7 28. Rgf3 Nf5 29. g3 Kg8 30. Qf4 Rd8 31. d5 {Step five: The fireworks begin!} Rc2 32. Nxf7 Rf8 33. dxe6 Rc5 34. b4 {Step six: Sign the scoresheet and walk back home with the full point!} 1-0

Master of building up attacks – Evgeny Tomashevsky

Levan Pantsulaia played a fine positional game to beat Ian Nepomniachtchi

Dmitry Jakovenko closed the match in Russia’s favour by beating Luka Paichadze

France continued their strong run in the tournament by beating the Ukrainians 2.5:1.5. With this win they are in the sole second spot with 10.0/11. The hero of the match was Laurent Fressinet who was able to beat Pavel Eljanov from the white side of the Berlin Wall. This tournament has been some sort of a downfall for the adherents of the Berlin. Black has lost many games in this event. But in the game between Laurent Fressinet and Pavel Eljanov, the result had nothing to do with the opening. Black got a fine position, even an edge, only to blunder towards the end and lose.

Laurent Fressinet – Pavel Eljanov, round six

After some inaccuracies Black has landed in a bad position. However, it is still not hopeless.
All that he has to do is leave the rook on d4 and be ready to capture Bxd4 with cxd4.
White is better but it is not the end of the world. Instead Eljanov played 31…Rd3??. Can you spot the win?

Fressinet closed out the game with the killer move 32.Bxc5! with the neat point that 32…Bxc5 will be met with 33.Rxc5 and the e-pawn cruises through.

Laurent Fressinet was the hero for the French team in their match against Ukraine

A loss in a classical game is a rare occurrence for Eljanov

Magnus Carlsen was back in his element scoring, what looked like,
an almost effortless victory over Peter Leko with the Black pieces

Daniel King’s video will take guide you through the Leko-Carlsen game

Check out Daniel King's Power Play DVDs here

Carlsen did win his game but Norway lost their match against Hungary 2.5:1.5.

Arkadij Naiditsch scored an important win over Ivan Sokolov
to give Azerbaijan a 2.5:1.5 win over Netherlands

Armenia won their match against Germany with a score of 2.5:1.5
thanks to the victory of Hrant Melkumyan (above) over Daniel Fridman

Team pairings and results of round six

No. Sd Team
Pts.
MP
Res.
:
Res.
MP
Pts.
Team Sd
1 17 Georgia
13½
8
:
9
13½
Russia 1
2 2 Ukraine
12
8
:
8
12½
France 4
3 3 Azerbaijan
13½
7
:
7
11½
Netherlands 9
4 6 Armenia
12
6
:
7
11
Germany 10
5 7 Hungary
12
6
:
6
11
Norway 11
6 23 Italy
11
6
:
6
11½
Spain 14
7 13 Latvia
11½
6
:
½
6
10½
Serbia 15
8 8 Poland
11
6
:
6
Finland 31
9 5 England
10½
5
:
5
Sweden 22
10 20 Romania
11½
5
2
:
2
5
Greece 18
11 21 Slovenia
11
5
1
:
3
5
10½
Czech Republic 12
12 29 Montenegro
5
:
4
10
Croatia 16
13 28 Switzerland
4
2
:
2
4
Turkey 19
14 25 Moldova
4
3
:
1
4
8
Iceland Legends 27
15 34 Faroe Islands
8
4
½
:
3
Iceland 24
16 36 Kosovo*
2
:
3
Lithuania 33
17 32 Belgium
6
1
:
2
7
Denmark 30
18 26 Austria
8
1
:
½
1
Scotland 35

Full board results of round six + Standings

GM Simon Williams and WIM Fiona Steil-Antoni are doing a great job as the official commentators.
You can have a look at all the interviews and live commentary video archives over here.

Pictures by Hrafn Jökulsson on the official facebook page of ETCC 2015


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 

Topics European Team

Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register

chessdrummer chessdrummer 11/20/2015 10:19
Watch Daniel King's video.
Aighearach Aighearach 11/20/2015 07:44
I was disappointed not to find the Carlsen game in the article. I keep checking here for news, and realizing I have to go to the tournament websites for full reports, then I wonder why I even started here.

Also... "like a" world champion? That is a rather bold and aggressive attack, and yet the purpose is not expressed at all. It sounds like something a writer would write, but not quite. I'll give you a hint: if you had already talked about her as world champion when introducing her game, then there would be no insult. But leaving it out, and then mentioning that she played "like a," it implies she is not really the champion. And yet, she is. Is there some sort of controversy about it? I thought she won the title clearly, without scandal.
stephen brady stephen brady 11/20/2015 01:47
Every match had at least one decisive game. I think that shows a good fighting spirit
1