A tricky lady

by Karsten Müller
10/9/2018 – Most players love to sacrifice their queen and win a spectacular game. Maybe that is why they often do not have enough faith in the strength of their strongest piece. Which will cost valuable points. Sometimes, far advanced passed pawns are strong enough to cope with a queen. But queens are dangerous and kings should never feel comfortable when the enemy queen is close. Here, the game ended with a draw. White could have won, but how?

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Premature handshake

Precise calculation is needed to find the path to victory for the white queen.
 

 

Endgames of the World Champions from Fischer to Carlsen

Let endgame expert Dr Karsten Müller show and explain the finesses of the world champions. Although they had different styles each and every one of them played the endgame exceptionally well, so take the opportunity to enjoy and learn from some of the best endgames in the history of chess.

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Karsten Mueller in ChessBase Magazine

Do you like these lessons? There are plenty more by internationally renowned endgame expert Dr Karsten Müller in ChessBase Magazine, where you will also find openings articles and surveys, tactics, and of course annotations by the world's top grandmasters.

Apart from his regular columns and video lectures in ChessBase Magazine there is a whole series of training DVDs by Karsten Mueller, which are bestsellers in the ChessBase Shop.

Karsten Mueller

Karsten Mueller regularly presents endgame lessons in the ChessBase Video Portal


ChessBase Magazine #186

The editor’s top ten:

  1. CBM 184Nimble knights against mighty bishops: Ian Nepomniachtchi reveals to you the subtleties of his win against Kramnik.
  2. Pseudo-fortress cracked open! Let Peter Heine Nielsen show you how at the very last minute Carlsen drew level with Caruana and Aronian in Saint Louis.
  3. Masterpiece with rook sacrifice: Enjoy Daniel King’s video analysis of Aronian-Grischuk from the Sinquefield Cup.
  4. Attack! Attack! Attack!” Together with GM Simon Williams carry out a deadly attack, studded with numerous sacrifices.
  5. Ten moves to your goal: Accompany Oliver Reeh "Step by step to checkmate". (Video)
  6. You think you have seen it all? Then take a look at "Nakamuras incredible win of a pawn".
  7. A dangerous and fun way to play”: Let Simon Williams make you an enthusiast of the Sicilian Wing Gambit! (Video)
  8. Mutual Isolanis": Strategy expert Mihail Marin explains the subtleties of the piece play with isolated d-pawns.
  9. Active on move three: Our new author Robert Hungaski shows how to accelerate matters with Black in the Queen's Gambit Accepted.
  10. A zugzwang to imitate: Let endgame expert Karsten Müller demonstrate the winning technique to you by means of the game Kovalev-Kramnik.

Links




Karsten Müller, born 1970, has a world-wide reputation as one of the greatest endgame experts. He has, together with Frank Lamprecht, written a book on the subject: “Fundamental Chess Endgames” in addition to other contributions such as his column on the website ChessCafe as well as in ChessBase Magazine. Müller's ChessBase-DVDs about endgames in Fritztrainer-Format are bestsellers. The PhD in mathematics lives in Hamburg, where he has also been hunting down points for the HSK in the Bundesliga for many years.
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Karsten Müller Karsten Müller 10/10/2018 01:50
Many thanks especially as I like geometrical motifs and winning zones so much!
malfa malfa 10/9/2018 04:49
A manoeuvre worth remembering! One could derive from this position a different, more theoretical puzzle: for the sake of making it harder for White, let's start by placing his pawn on h2 instead of e5, then we take the white king off the board and finally ask: where should he be placed if White is to win? If I am not wrong, the possible answers are rather limited: a4, a5, b3, b4, b5, c3, c4, c5, d2, d4, e2, e3, f2, f3. It is especially worth noting that d3, though closer than other winning squares, is not good, since there the king is bound to be checked by the promoting pawn on b1, like all the squares on the first rank.
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