China and Russia win FIDE World Team Championship

by Albert Silver
6/28/2017 – It was a remarkable finish to a remarkable event. Entering the final round of the FIDE World Team Championship, gold seemed a lock for the Chinese since the only way Russia could beat them was if they not only drew Poland, but Russia beat the US by 3.5-0.5. However, the Russians did even better as they swept the US 4-0. China, in danger of faltering, was saved by Li Chao who scored a powerful and crucial win. In the Women’s Russia beat Ukraine and took gold. Final report with GM analysis.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

All photos by Anastasia Balakhontseva

Round nine

The FIDE Open and Women’s World Team Chess Championships is taking place from June 16 to June 27, 2017 (June 21 is a free day) in the the Ugra Chess Academy of the oil-book town of Khanty-Mansiysk, in western Siberia. Ten open and ten women's teams are participating. Games start at 3 p.m. local time – 12 noon CEST, 6 a.m. New York (check your location).

Open section

Open section - Round 9 on 2017/06/26 at 13:00
No.
SNo.
Team
Res.
Team
SNo.
1
5
TURKEY
1.5-2.5
BELARUS
10
2
6
UKRAINE
2.5-1.5
EGYPT
4
3
7
RUSSIA
4-0
USA
3
4
8
NORWAY
1-3
INDIA
2
5
9
POLAND
1.5-2.5
CHINA
1

For board wise break down, click here

Without wishing to take anything away from the other teams, who all came and competed to their fullest, there was no question that only two matches would have everyone riveted, save for nationals rooting for their home team of another country. The matches in question were China versus Poland, and Russia versus the USA. The main reason for this intense interest was the gold medal, and while it seemed a virtual certainty China would take gold, it was not guaranteed.

Fur Russia to score an upset, first of all China would need to be held to a draw against Poland. This was hardly impossible, and Turkey had managed this feat earlier in the event, and they were weaker than Poland on paper. Still, even if this happened, Russia would still need to beat the USA by at least 3.5-0.5. Of the conditions to meet, this seemed like a very tall order, after all, while the USA might not be playing with their Big Three, nor was Russia playing with their Olympic team.

However, Russia did even better as they completely smashed the US team by 4-0. It was not as clear-cut as the score suggests of course. Ian Nepomniachtchi did not take long to show his cards as he sacked a pawn on move six to aggressively fight for an opening advantage against Sam Shankland.

Ian Nepomniachtchi vs Sam Shankland

[Event "World Team-ch 2017"] [Site "Khanty-Mansyisk"] [Date "2017.06.26"] [Round "9"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Shankland, Samuel L"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B12"] [WhiteElo "2732"] [BlackElo "2676"] [Annotator "A. Silver"] [PlyCount "137"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. g4 Be4 5. f3 Bg6 6. e6 $5 {While this move is certainly well-represented in the databases, it has never been seen in grandmaster play. This was not some on-the-spot inspiration, and shows the Russians plan to give it their all to change the direction of that golden wind. } (6. Ne2 e6 7. h4 h5 8. Ng3 Qb6 9. a4 a5 10. c3 c5 11. Na3 cxd4 12. cxd4 Bb4+ 13. Kf2 Nd7 {1-0 (50) Shirov,A (2705)-Parligras,M (2650) Porto Carras 2011}) 6... fxe6 7. h4 Nd7 $146 {The 'official' novelty.} (7... c5 $5) (7... e5 8. dxe5 e6 9. h5 Bf7 10. Be3 c5 11. Bb5+ Nc6 12. Qd2 Qc7 13. Bf4 Nge7 {1/2-1/2 (22) Kranjec,T (2157)-Grabner,J (2184) ICCF email 2005}) 8. h5 Bf7 9. f4 {[#]} e5 {An excellent practical decision. The e6 pawn is unlikely to survive in the longterm, so Black decides to unload it right away to work on his development.} 10. fxe5 e6 11. Nf3 c5 12. c3 Ne7 13. Bd3 Nc6 14. O-O Qb6 15. Kg2 Rc8 16. a3 { An interesting idea. not only does it prevent cxd4 cxd4 Nb4, but it also waves a red flag inviting Black to take on d4.} cxd4 {Black takes! However, he is walking into a minefield.} 17. cxd4 Nxd4 18. Nxd4 Qxd4 19. Bg6 $1 Qxd1 20. Bxf7+ Kd8 ({Trying to keep the king on the Bf7 is very risky.} 20... Ke7 21. Bg5+ Nf6 22. Rxd1 Kxf7 23. exf6 gxf6 24. Be3 {and White is clearly better, up a piece for two pawns.}) 21. Rxd1 Ke7 22. Rf1 Rc2+ 23. Kh1 Nxe5 24. Bg5+ Kd7 25. Nc3 {Black must now prevent Rae1.} Nxg4 {aiming for ...Rh2+.} 26. Bxe6+ Kxe6 27. Rae1+ Kd6 {[#]} 28. Rxf8 $1 Nf2+ {A miscalculation.} ({Of course not} 28... Rh2+ $6 29. Kg1 $16) ({Black just need to take back with} 28... Rxf8 $11 29. Be7+ Kd7 30. Bxf8 Nf2+ 31. Kh2 d4 {and the position is not clear as White's pawns are quickly disappearing.}) 29. Rxf2 $1 $14 Rxf2 30. Nb5+ Kc6 31. Nxa7+ Kc7 32. Nb5+ Kb8 33. b4 Rf5 34. Be7 Rxh5+ 35. Kg2 d4 36. Nxd4 Rd5 37. Bc5 Rhd8 38. Re4 h5 39. a4 g5 (39... Kc8 $14) 40. a5 ({White should try} 40. Bb6 $16) 40... g4 41. a6 ({Better is} 41. Bb6 $1 $16) 41... bxa6 42. Nc6+ Kc7 43. Nxd8 Kxd8 $16 44. Kg3 Rf5 45. Kh4 Rd5 46. Re3 Kc7 47. Re7+ Kb8 48. Bb6 Rb5 49. Bc7+ Ka8 50. Ba5 Rf5 51. Re6 Kb7 52. Rg6 Ka7 53. Rb6 Rd5 54. Rf6 Kb7 55. Rf4 Ka7 56. Kg3 (56. Rf7+ $16 Kb8 57. Rh7) 56... Rd3+ $14 57. Kf2 Rd5 58. Ke3 Re5+ 59. Kf2 Kb7 60. Rf7+ Ka8 61. Rg7 Re4 62. Kg3 Re5 63. Kf4 $1 Rd5 64. Ke4 Rb5 65. Kd4 Rf5 66. Bb6 Rb5 $2 67. Rg8+ Kb7 68. Bc5 Kc7 69. Ke4 1-0

Maxim Matlakov also came up with a bit of ingenious opening preparation, though not quite as early as Nepo’s, and in a lengthy but sharp line of the Queen’s Gambit Declined, he came up with a powerful novelty with 17. Bf5! against Ray Robson.

Matlakov vs Robson

 

Although this gave him a nice edge, he soon squandered it as the two showed nerves, and it wasn’t until a serious mistake in the endgame that things well and truly soured. There might be many explanations for it, but quite likely, it was after feeling constantly on the verge of getting into big troubles for so many moves, the chance to enter a plain knight endgame, had to feel like he was out of trouble. Tragically, and typically, for such Murphy’s Law moments, it was that last queen exchange that made his life difficult, and ultimately cost him the game.

Matlakov vs Robson

[Event "World Team-ch 2017"] [Site "Khanty-Mansyisk"] [Date "2017.06.26"] [Round "9"] [White "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Black "Robson, Ray"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D51"] [WhiteElo "2707"] [BlackElo "2656"] [Annotator "A. Silver"] [PlyCount "105"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 Nbd7 6. e3 h6 7. Bh4 g5 8. Bg3 Nh5 9. Qc2 Nxg3 10. hxg3 Bg7 11. O-O-O Qe7 12. Bd3 Nb6 13. c5 Nd7 14. e4 $36 g4 15. Nh4 $1 Bxd4 16. exd5 Nxc5 17. Bf5 $146 (17. dxe6 Bxe6 {0-1 (28) Vitiugov,N (2726)-Artemiev,V (2653) Doha 2016}) 17... Be5 (17... Bg7 $1 $11 {keeps the balance.} 18. dxe6 Bxe6) 18. dxe6 $16 Bxe6 19. Rhe1 Bf6 {[#]} 20. Bxg4 $2 (20. b4 $1 $18) 20... Bxh4 $11 21. gxh4 Rd8 22. Bxe6 Nxe6 23. Ne4 O-O 24. Qc3 Rxd1+ 25. Rxd1 Rd8 26. Qg3+ Kf8 27. Rxd8+ Qxd8 28. Qd6+ {[#]} Qxd6 (28... Qe7 { was better and less trouble.}) 29. Nxd6 $14 Nf4 30. g3 Nd3+ 31. Kd2 Nxf2 32. Ke2 Ke7 33. Nxb7 Ne4 (33... Ng4 $1 $14) 34. Kf3 $18 Nf6 35. b4 Nd5 36. a3 Nc3 ( {Black had once again managed to reset the balance but goes astray once more. He had to play} 36... f5 $1 $11) 37. Na5 $16 Kd6 38. Kg4 ({White should play} 38. g4 $16) 38... Ne2 39. Nc4+ Ke6 $1 40. Ne3 Ke5 41. Nf5 h5+ 42. Kg5 f6+ $2 { The last mistake, after which there is no salvation.} (42... a6 $16 {was tougher.} 43. g4 hxg4 44. Kxg4 Nc3) 43. Kg6 $18 a6 44. a4 Nc3 45. Ne7 Kd6 46. Nf5+ Ke5 47. Ng7 Ne4 48. Nxh5 f5 49. a5 c5 {[#]} 50. b5 $1 c4 (50... axb5 51. a6) 51. bxa6 c3 52. a7 c2 53. Nf4 1-0

Russia's 4-0 win over Team USA was the only clean sweep in the Open section

While Alexander Onischuk lost badly to Nikita Vitiugov, one of the least clear games was that between the two youthful talents: Jeffery Xiong and Vladimir Fedoseev. It was a great battle with many fascinating moments. Consider this position after 23…gxh3

Xiong vs Fedoseev

 

Still, it was not enough, and while Fedoseev was not perfect either, it was White who spent his time alternating between ‘may be ok’ and ‘in big trouble’.

Jeffery Xiong vs Vladimir Fedoseev

[Event "World Team-ch 2017"] [Site "Khanty-Mansyisk"] [Date "2017.06.26"] [Round "9"] [White "Xiong, Jeffery"] [Black "Fedoseev, Vladimir"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E11"] [WhiteElo "2658"] [BlackElo "2703"] [Annotator "A. Silver"] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qc2 a5 (8... Nbd7 9. Rd1 b6 10. Bf4 Bb7 11. Ne5 Nh5 12. Bd2 Nhf6 13. cxd5 cxd5 14. Nc6 Bxc6 15. Qxc6 Rc8 16. Qb5 Ne8 17. Qd3 Nd6 18. Nc3 Nf6 19. b3 Qd7 20. Rac1 Rfd8 21. Rc2 Nde4 22. Be1 {1/2-1/2 (22) Radjabov,T (2710) -Gelfand,B (2724) Moscow 2017}) 9. Rd1 b5 10. c5 Nbd7 11. Bf4 Nh5 12. Bc1 f5 13. Ne5 Nxe5 14. dxe5 g5 15. Nd2 Qc7 16. Nf3 g4 17. Nd4 Bd7 $146 18. Bf4 Nxf4 19. gxf4 b4 ({ It seems unlikely the players knew it, but they transposed to a game played three years ago all the way up to move 19.} 19... Kh8 20. f3 Rg8 21. Kh1 Rg6 22. fxg4 Rxg4 23. e3 Rag8 24. Bf3 R4g6 25. a3 Qd8 26. b4 a4 27. Rg1 Rxg1+ { 1/2-1/2 (27) Andersen,M (2476)-Farago,I (2484) Germany 2014}) 20. a4 bxa3 21. Rxa3 Rfb8 22. h3 Qa7 23. Rc3 gxh3 $1 {[#]} 24. Bxd5 $3 (24. Bxh3 {was certainly playable, but allows Black to grab the initiative after} Kh8 25. Kh2 Rb4 26. e3 Qb8 27. b3 Qf8) 24... cxd5 (24... exd5 25. e6 Kh8 26. exd7 Qxd7 27. Rxh3 Bf6 28. e3 Rb4) 25. c6 Kh8 26. cxd7 Rg8+ 27. Kh1 Qxd7 28. Rc7 Qe8 29. Qc3 (29. Nxe6 $5 Qg6 30. Ng5 Bxg5 31. Rg1 $14) 29... Rg6 30. Rc1 Bh4 31. Nf3 $1 Bd8 32. Rb7 Qg8 33. Nd4 $2 (33. Nh2 $1) 33... Bh4 $2 ({Stronger was} 33... Rg4 { with the idea of Qxh3 Rh4} 34. Nxf5 $1 h2 $1 {The threat is Rg1+ Kxh2 Qg2 mate. } ({The point being that after} 34... exf5 35. e6+ {is game over for Black.}) 35. Ng3 Rxf4 $17) 34. Qf3 (34. Nf3 $1 $11 {was the only way to keep the balance.} Bd8 35. Ng1) 34... Rc8 35. Rc6 $2 Rg1+ $19 36. Kh2 Rg2+ 37. Kh1 Rxc6 38. Nxc6 Qg4 39. Nd4 Rxf2 40. Rb8+ Kg7 41. Nxe6+ Kh6 42. Qxg4 fxg4 43. Rb6 Bg3 0-1

So Russia had done all it could, but their fate was still not in their hands, since China still had to fail to win their match. It almost seemed as if this might be possible, were it not for Li Chao’s superb win that ensured China the gold.

Li Chao (CHN) vs Mateusz Bartel (POL) (annotated by GM Krikor Mekhitarian)

[Event "FIDE World Team Championship"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2017.06.26"] [Round "9.4"] [White "Li, Chao b"] [Black "Bartel, Mateusz"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D16"] [WhiteElo "2720"] [BlackElo "2637"] [Annotator "Krikor Sevag Mekhitarian"] [PlyCount "75"] [EventDate "2017.06.16"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "RUS"] [WhiteTeam "China"] [BlackTeam "Poland"] [WhiteTeamCountry "CHN"] [BlackTeamCountry "POL"] [WhiteClock "0:11:28"] [BlackClock "0:06:37"] {And we got to the last round! China plays Poland in a decisive match. We will analyse this very nice game played in the 4th board.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 e6 {Black wants to play a Queen's Gambit Accepted position, with an additional a4 for White (which is a free move, but also a weakening one). I found two notable examples of this variation in the past, and by past I mean almost a hundred years ago!} 6. e3 (6. e4 $5 {A more energetic way to fight this variation.} Bb4 7. e5 Nd5 8. Bd2 b5 {is the move nowadays} (8... Bxc3 $6 9. bxc3 b5 10. Ng5 $1 {Now there is no reason to take on b5} f6 $6 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. Be2 $16 {with a nice positional advantage, the great Alekhine went on to win this game, in the 1929 World-Ch match against Bogoljubow} a6 13. Bf3 h6 14. Bh5+ Nxh5 15. Qxh5+ Kd7 16. Nf7 Qe8 17. Qg6 Rg8 18. Bf4 Bb7 19. Bg3 Ke7 20. Bd6+ Kd7 21. O-O c5 22. dxc5 Bd5 23. axb5 axb5 24. Rxa8 Bxa8 25. Ra1 Nc6 26. Ne5+ {1-0 (26) Alekhine,A-Bogoljubow,E GER/NLD 1929}) 9. axb5 Bxc3 {Black only takes here when it is necessary} 10. bxc3 cxb5 11. Ng5 {a recent example from 2017:} Bb7 12. Qh5 Qe7 13. Be2 Nd7 14. O-O a5 15. Rfb1 Bc6 $13 {with a complex position: 1/2-1/2 (24) Wang,H (2683)-Fressinet,L (2662) Sharjah 2017}) 6... c5 7. Bxc4 Nc6 8. O-O cxd4 9. Nxd4 $5 {this has become a fashionable move lately. White wants to isolate the pawn only after the knight exchange. We will see why this makes sense} (9. exd4 {is the common move, with many examples from top games - the most recent from the USA-Ch} Be7 10. Qe2 ( 10. d5 {doesn't do much} exd5 11. Nxd5 Nxd5 12. Bxd5 O-O 13. Be3 $11 {and Black is perfectly fine}) 10... O-O 11. Rd1 Nb4 {the current fashion} (11... Nd5 {Alatortsev, a very important name from Soviet chess in the 1930s, played 5...e6!? exactly as they play today, with a quick c5, followed by Nc6. It is amazing to see that exactly 75 years ago, some players already knew plans and ideas that remain consistent with today's modern play.} 12. Be3 b6 $13 {1/2-1/2 (68) Sokolsky,A-Alatortsev,V Kuibyshev 1942}) 12. a5 Bd7 13. Ne5 Be8 14. Bg5 Nfd5 15. Bd2 $13 {with a typical isolated pawn setup: 1/2-1/2 (51) Nakamura,H (2793) -Shankland,S (2666) Saint Louis 2017}) 9... Bd7 (9... Nxd4 $6 {Now this is not precise. White achieves d5! and there is a big difference with the knights exchanged} 10. exd4 Be7 11. d5 exd5 12. Nxd5 Nxd5 13. Bxd5 {comparing with 9. exd4 and 10.d5, the bishop on d5 is much stronger (b7 is a real problem now)} O-O 14. Be3 Bg5 15. Qb3 $16 {1-0 (53) Banikas,H (2618)-Postny,E (2648) Kavala 2015}) 10. e4 (10. Nf3 {seen in last year's Candidates tournament} a6 11. e4 Qc7 12. h3 Bd6 13. Qe2 O-O 14. Bd3 Ne5 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 16. f4 Bd4+ 17. Be3 Bxe3+ 18. Qxe3 e5 19. Rac1 exf4 20. Qxf4 Qxf4 21. Rxf4 Be6 $11 {and Black equalized without problems: 1/2-1/2 (30) Karjakin,S (2760)-Svidler,P (2757) Moscow 2016}) 10... Nxd4 (10... Qb8 {This whole variation clearly has been in the Chinese labs for some time - we can find many examples from them, like this one from the Chinese league:} 11. Re1 (11. Be3 $1 {preparing f4, thus avoiding the annoying Bd6}) 11... Bd6 $1 12. Nxc6 Bxc6 13. Nd5 Nd7 $1 14. Bg5 $13 {Ding Liren got over-ambitious, and soon found himself in a lost position, though he escaped with a draw: 1/2-1/2 (28) Ding,L (2777)-Yu,R (2516) China 2016}) 11. Qxd4 Bc6 12. Qe3 $1 {White wants to keep the queens because of the better development, and attacking prospects on the king-side} Be7 (12... Qb6 {another Chinese player as Black} 13. Qe2 (13. Qg3 $5 $36 {keeping an eye on g7}) 13... Be7 14. Bg5 Qc5 15. Be3 Qa5 16. Bb5 O-O 17. Bxc6 bxc6 18. h3 Rab8 $11 {with a fine position, the b2 weakness compensates the c6 one. ½-½ (83) Gupta,A (2607)-Xu, X (2503) Dubai 2017}) 13. e5 Nd7 (13... Nd5 $6 14. Bxd5 Bxd5 15. Qg3 $16) 14. Qg3 g6 15. Re1 $1 {I like Li Chao's move} (15. Rd1 {played in the same match and round! That probably shows the strong team work made by China, where the players study together. I remember a match from many years ago in the Olympiad, between China and Georgia, where boards 1 and 3 where playing the same position, as well as boards 2 and 4! :-)} a6 16. Bh6 Qa5 17. Bf1 Bf8 18. Bxf8 Kxf8 19. f4 Qb6+ 20. Qf2 Qxf2+ 21. Kxf2 {Unlike Li Chao, Yu wasn't able to achieve an advantage, and soon a draw was agreed. ½-½ (30) Yu,Y (2749)-Duda, J (2697) Khanty-Mansiysk 2017}) (15. Bh6 {similar to Yu's game, Black would probably go for a6, followed by Bf8 at some point}) 15... O-O 16. Bh6 Re8 17. Rad1 {with natural moves, White achieves a very active position, with prospects on the king-side. Naturally, he has to control some counterplay in the center, because the position is very open, and the e5-pawn for example may become a weakness. This looks like the Alapín variation from the Sicilian defense.} Qc7 18. h4 $1 Rad8 19. Rc1 $5 {avoiding exchanges and especially trying to stop Nc5} Qb6 (19... Nc5 $2 20. b4 $1 Nxa4 21. b5 Nxc3 22. Rxc3 $18) 20. h5 Nf8 $2 (20... Nc5 $1 $132 {looked much more appealing than Nf8. It's understandable the desire to control the g6-square with another piece, but there must be central counterplay, otherwise White just cruises, as happened in the game. And here it is not easy to bring the forces over to the king-side with this annoying knight on c5}) 21. b3 a6 22. Ne2 (22. Ne4 $5 {was another way to play the position, looking for a positional advantage on the queen-side} Bxe4 23. Rxe4 $16 {But Li Chao wanted Bartel's king, and he went for it!}) 22... Bd5 $2 {it is hard to give good advice for Black here, but this ends the resistance. If Black does nothing, White will continue to pile in forces on the king-side, but it was still better to try something in the center, maybe 22...Rd7} (22... Rd7 $5 {a very difficult move when your opponent is going all in against your king} 23. Nf4 Rd4 {somehow the computer doesn't show a clear-cut way to win sacrificing on g6, but from the human point of view, allowing Nf4 looks suicidal.} 24. hxg6 hxg6 25. Bxf8 Kxf8 26. Nxg6+ fxg6 27. Qxg6 Bh4 $1 28. g3 Qc7 29. gxh4 Qg7 30. Qxg7+ Kxg7 $14 {and after taking on h4, Black has good chances to hold}) 23. Bxd5 Rxd5 (23... exd5 {there is no time to estabilish a knight on e6} 24. Nf4 $1 $16 {and Black is in big trouble}) 24. Nc3 $1 Rd7 25. Ne4 $18 {now the simple threat of Qf4 and/or Bg5, and later invading the f6-square, decides. Black is lost} Qd8 26. Qf3 {the computers already point out more than 4 points advantage for White! (in a 40-ply depth analysis). Apparently, the plan is to go for Re3-Qf4-Rf3} Rd3 27. Re3 Rd4 (27... Rxe3 28. fxe3 $18 {Rf1 is simply destroying}) 28. Qf4 g5 {forced, now everything falls apart} 29. Qg3 Rd1+ 30. Re1 Rd3 31. f3 f6 32. exf6 Bxf6 33. Bxg5 Bxg5 34. Nxg5 Qd4+ 35. Kh2 Qg7 36. Rc7 Rd7 37. Rxd7 Nxd7 38. Rxe6 { A very important victory, securing the World Team Championship title for China!! Let's all remember they also won the 2014 Olympiad. The question remains - who will stop them?} 1-0

After taking gold in the 2016 Olympiad, they came in full battle gear and were gold in the World Team Championship as well.

It was a valiant effort, and Russia did well as they came in second and silver

Poland fought a great campaign, and finished in a deserved third place

The surprising Turks came in 5th in the end, ahead of several notable teams, such as the USA. Impressive.

Crosstable of Open section

Rank Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 MP Pts.
1
CHINA
*
2
2
16
24½
2
RUSSIA
*
3
2
3
4
3
15
25
3
POLAND
1
*
3
3
3
12
20½
4
INDIA
*
2
3
11
20½
5
TURKEY
2
2
2
*
2
1
3
10
18½
6
UKRAINE
1
2
*
2
3
8
17½
7
BELARUS
½
1
1
2
*
2
8
17½
8
USA
2
0
½
3
2
*
3
8
16
9
NORWAY
½
1
1
1
½
*
2
11
10
EGYPT
½
½
1
1
½
1
*
0
9

Women's section

Women's section - Round 9 on 2017/06/26 at 13:00
No.
SNo
Team
Res
Team
SNo
1
5
RUSSIA
3-1
UKRAINE
10
2
6
CHINA
3-1
EGYPT
4
3
7
VIETNAM
1.5-2.5
POLAND
3
4
8
AZERBAIJAN
1-3
INDIA
2
5
9
GEORGIA
3-1
USA
1

For a board wise break down, click here

In the women's section, the only way Ukraine could threaten Russia was by beating them 4-0, and contrary to the Open section where such scores did take place, there were to be no heroic measures in the last round, and Ukraine was defeated 3-1 by Russia. As a result of their second consecutive defeat, Ukraine was unable to even make the podium, since they were tied with Georgia and India, but with the worse tiebreak.

The proud Russian women took gold in Khanty-Mansiysk

In spite of a fairly lackadaisical start, China did manage to come in clear second and take silver

Georgia came in third thanks to a better tiebreak than...

... India, who lost to Russia and drew against the second and third place finishers.

Crosstable of Women's section

Rank Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 MP Pts.
1
RUSSIA
*
3
3
3
2
3
2
16
25½
2
CHINA
1
*
2
2
3
3
2
3
13
22
3
GEORGIA
½
*
2
2
3
3
3
4
12
21½
4
INDIA
1
2
2
*
3
3
12
20
5
UKRAINE
1
2
*
2
3
12
19½
6
POLAND
½
1
2
2
*
2
9
18½
7
USA
2
1
1
2
*
2
2
6
16½
8
VIETNAM
1
1
1
2
*
4
5
16
9
AZERBAIJAN
2
2
1
1
½
2
*
4
5
15½
10
EGYPT
½
1
0
1
½
½
0
0
*
0
5

Links

You can use ChessBase 14 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs to replay the games in PGN. You can also download our free Playchess client, which will in addition give you immediate access to the chess server Playchess.com..



Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register