Candidates Rd12: Young guns forge ahead!

by Sagar Shah
3/25/2016 – The comeback man, to the chagrin of a billion fans, has been beaten back – Anand was defeated in only 26 moves by Nakamura. Now Karjakin is staging a comeback by defeating Topalov. Meanwhile FIDE President Ilyumzhinov has hinted that the World Championship in November might take place in the Trump Tower in New York! Here is the full report with pictures, videos, and analysis.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The 2016 FIDE World Chess Candidates Tournament is a 14-round event, which determines the next Challenger to Magnus Carlsen's title, is taking place in Moscow from March 10–30. Eight players, including six of the World's top-ten rated grandmasters. The time control is 100 minutes for the first 40 moves, 50 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, plus an additional 30 seconds per move starting from move one. The guaranteed prize fund is US $420,000.

Candidates round twelve – Young guns forge ahead!

Report from Moscow by IM Sagar Shah and Amruta Mokal

No one, absolutely no one, is pulling out ahead as the clear favourite to win the World Championship Candidates 2016. At the end of the twelfth round we have six players with a theoretical chance of winning this one, although the ones with clear edge at this point are definitely Fabiano Caruana and Sergey Karjakin. What’s even more interesting is the fact that both of them will play against each other in the last round of the tournament. As we are heading towards the end of the event the intensity of the players has increased. No one is satisfied with a quick draw. Even Topalov who has been rooted to the last spot from the start, has had to work hard because his opponents are gunning for the first place. This is what makes the Candidates special – the fight for that elusive gold. The only place with any meaning or value, is that one ticket to New York!

The twelfth round was filled with excitement – two decisive games and two fighting draws. Anish was so reluctant to split the point that he made Svidler play the drawn rook endgame for almost an hour, dragging on the day until 10 p.m.! So let’s first begin with Nakamura’s excellent preparation against Vishy Anand.

Round 12, Friday 25 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Giri Anish
Nakamura Hikaru
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Karjakin Sergey
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Aronian Levon
Rest day, Saturday 26 March 2016

Daniel King on Round 12: Nakamura vs Anand and Karjakin vs Topalov

Fritztrainer DVDs by Daniel King

Note that ChessBase is doing daily one-hour roundup shows after each round

Hikaru Nakamura – Viswanathan Anand 1-0

Anand is having the most topsy-turvy event of his career at the Candidates 2016. One day he plays a complete brilliancy, reminding us what an amazing endgame player he is, and the next day his performance shows as if he is having the worst tournament of his life. This has been going on for four rounds now. Against Aronian he played a great endgame but this was followed by a debacle against Caruana. Karjakin got a taste of modern day Capablanca, while Nakamura simply crushed him in 26 moves!

Anand played with great ambitions. His move g5 was risky, although objectively pretty good. Nakamura knew all the intricacies of this line and he forced Anand to find the best ideas over the board – a task which turned out to be too much. Vishy made one inaccuracy and that was enough to land him in a completely lost position. Nakamura’s conversion was smooth and this gave the American his first convincing victory in the tournament.

Nakamura shows the lines in the press conference, while Vishy didn’t speak a single word

[Event "Candidates 2016"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.03.25"] [Round "12"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2790"] [BlackElo "2762"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "51"] {It was a complete debacle for Anand who was outprepared by Hikaru Nakamura.} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 Bb4 5. Nd5 $5 (5. Bg2 {Had been played by Caruana against Anand.}) 5... e4 {Anand is trying to play sharp lines with Black. Of course, he has every right to believe in his preparation but things didn't work out today.} (5... Bc5 {is a safer way to play.}) 6. Nh4 O-O 7. Bg2 d6 (7... Re8 {this was played by Anand's second Grzegorz Gajewski. It could have given Nakamura and his team an idea that Vishy might go for this.} 8. O-O d6 9. d3 exd3 10. Qxd3 Nxd5 11. cxd5 Ne5 12. Qc2 Bc5 13. Bd2 a5 {1/2-1/2 (98) Iordachescu,V (2590)-Gajewski,G (2646) Jerusalem 2015}) 8. a3 $146 {This is a new move in over the board games, although it has been played in correspondence chess.} ({A logical question to ask is why shouldn't White win the e4 pawn?} 8. Nxf6+ Qxf6 9. Bxe4 Re8 $1 10. Bg2 Bg4 $19 {With tons and tons of activity.}) 8... Bc5 9. O-O Re8 10. e3 $1 {This is computer preparation in action. White takes away the d4 square and gets ready to chase the bishop away with b4. At the same time f3 is a real threat now. Normally one would play a move like d3 in such positions. But chess has become much more concrete thanks to the engines and such anti-intuitive moves are no longer a rarity.} (10. d3 $6 {would be the more natural move but it is not so great.} exd3 11. exd3 Nxd5 12. cxd5 Nd4 $15 {Black cannot be worse here.}) (10. b4 Bd4 11. Rb1 Ne7 $1 12. e3 Nexd5 13. exd4 Nb6 14. d3 exd3 15. Qxd3 d5 $1 $11) 10... g5 {A logical question to ask is why did Anand indulge in such complicated play when he knew that his opponent was so well prepared? The answer to this is not easy. First of all you want to respect the fact that your opponent is well prepared but you always don't want to change the things you have prepared with the fear that he might have something up his sleeve. Anand was confident and he went for his line. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't - this is the story of modern opening preparation!} (10... a5 {trying to stop b4 will now be met with} 11. f3 $1 exf3 (11... g5 $2 12. Nxf6+ Qxf6 13. fxe4 $18) 12. Qxf3 $14) 11. b4 Bb6 {As Nakamura later pointed out, this is the human reaction.} (11... gxh4 { would have been the better option.} 12. Bb2 $5 Nxd5 13. cxd5 Ne5 14. bxc5 Bg4 { And Black is doing much better than in the game because of the control of the f3 square.}) 12. Bb2 $1 Nxd5 13. cxd5 Nd4 {Nakamura said that he had looked at the move Ne5 in his preparation and this came as a surprise. But Anand was already thinking quite a bit and had found this over the board which meant that there could be some flaw in it.} (13... Ne5 14. f4 $1 {This is a very strong move.} gxh4 (14... Bg4 15. Qc2 $16) 15. fxe5 dxe5 (15... Qg5 16. gxh4) 16. Qh5 $18) (13... gxh4 14. dxc6 bxc6 15. Qh5 {is almost a disaster.}) 14. d3 $1 (14. Bxd4 Bxd4 15. exd4 gxh4 16. Qh5 Bd7 {Black can still fight.}) 14... gxh4 (14... exd3 15. Qxd3 Qf6 (15... gxh4 16. Bxd4 $16) 16. Rfd1 gxh4 (16... Nf3+ 17. Nxf3 Qxb2 18. Nxg5 $16) 17. Bxd4 Bxd4 18. Qxd4 Qxd4 19. Rxd4 hxg3 20. hxg3 {is a hopeless position for Black. Rooks will double on the c-file and there would be unbearable pressure.}) 15. dxe4 Ne6 16. dxe6 Rxe6 17. e5 $1 { Very incisive play by Nakamura.} hxg3 18. hxg3 Qg5 19. exd6 Rxd6 20. Qb3 h5 ( 20... Rh6 {with the idea of Bh3 was possible.} 21. Rfd1 Bh3 22. Qc3 f6 23. Bxh3 Rxh3 24. Qb3+ Kh8 25. Qe6 Rh6 26. Rd5 Qg6 27. Rad1 $18) 21. Rad1 Rh6 {Anand realises that playing normal chess is anyway not going to get him anywhere, his position is anyway lost. But with this ambitious idea of Rh6 followed by h4 he has made Nakamura's task of finding the best move a little more difficult as one one path exists.} 22. Rd5 Qe7 {At this point I was analyzing with Dusan Krunic (chess informant) about how White should take advantage of these weakness. Qc3 looked like the most obvious way but after f6 with the idea of Be6 it seemed as if Black was consolidating. We thought about many different moves, they were good but not the best. Something was missing - what was the key to the position? And then Nakamura made his move and we realized, yes! It was the h6 rook!} 23. Qc4 $1 {The idea is to play Qf4 and attack the rook on h6. A very strong move.} Bg4 24. Qf4 Rg6 25. Re5 Qd6 26. Be4 {A crushing win for Nakamura. It was for the second time in this tournament that Anand resigned with equal material on the board. First one was against Sergey in round four.} (26. Bxb7 $18 {was also winning.}) (26. Be4 f5 (26... Rg7 27. Rg5 Rxg5 28. Qxg5+ Kf8 29. Be5 Qe6 30. Bxb7 Rb8 (30... Re8 31. Bg7+ Kg8 32. Bf6+ $18) 31. Bf6 $18) 27. Bxf5 Rf8 28. Qc4+ $18) 1-0

Even though the tournament hasn't been going as planned for Hikaru, a win is always welcome!

Can Vishy make another comeback?!

Sergey Karjakin – Veselin Topalov 1-0

The reason why everyone is looking forward to seeing the games of Veselin Topalov is because he has absolutely nothing to lose and is ready to try out new stuff. At the same time his opponents are fighting for something really huge. This battle of carefree versus responsible approach is making the Bulgarian’s games very interesting to follow.

In the twelfth round, in reply to Karjakin’s 1.e4, he replied with the Sicilian Defence. The position reached was extremely complicated with both sides having their chances. Topalov made a huge error in the following position:

The knight on c4 is as threatening as the pawn on g6. Here Black had to play 17…Bf6! Instead he went for 17…Rc8. The result was a complete disaster! After 18.h6! all the lines towards the black king were opened and the e6 pawn became too weak to hold. Karjakin won an exchange and with some care also the game.

[Event "Candidates 2016"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.03.25"] [Round "12"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Topalov, Veselin"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B81"] [WhiteElo "2760"] [BlackElo "2780"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "68"] 1. e4 c5 {The first time that Sicilian was played in this tournament and it had to be Topalov!} 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. h3 e6 7. g4 Nfd7 8. Be3 Be7 {Topalov's idea of not touching the b8 knight for the time being is new and has not been seen at the highest level before.} 9. g5 b5 10. a3 Bb7 11. h4 O-O 12. Qd2 Nb6 13. h5 {While Black has pretty harmonius development White has got his attack rolling.} N8d7 14. g6 Ne5 (14... Nc5 $5 15. Rg1 $5 (15. gxf7+ Rxf7 16. b4 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 Bxe4 18. Nxe6 Qd7 $19) 15... Bf6 $13 (15... Nxe4 16. Nxe4 Bxe4 17. gxf7+ Rxf7 18. Nxe6 Qd7 19. Nxg7 Rxg7 20. Rxg7+ Kxg7 21. Qd4+ $18)) 15. O-O-O {It is natural that Karjakin wanted to 0-0-0 to stay away from checks and threats on f3 but maybe he could have started directly with h6.} (15. h6 $5 Bf6 16. hxg7 Bxg7 17. gxf7+ Rxf7 18. O-O-O Nbc4 19. Bxc4 Nxc4 20. Qe2 $14) 15... Nbc4 16. Bxc4 Nxc4 17. Qe2 Rc8 $2 ( 17... Bf6 $1 {After this Black would have a perfectly acceptable position.} 18. h6 hxg6 19. hxg7 Bxg7 $15) 18. h6 $1 fxg6 19. Nxe6 Qd7 (19... Qa5 20. hxg7 Rf7 21. Rxh7 $1 $18) 20. Nxf8 {Topalov simply forgot about this move. He was only thinking about hxg7.} (20. hxg7 Rf6 {Although even this is winning after} 21. Ng5 $1 $18) 20... Bxf8 21. hxg7 Bxg7 22. Bd4 {White has completely secured his position and stands clearly better. Karjakin went onto win without too many difficulties.} a5 (22... Bxd4 23. Rxd4 Nxa3 24. bxa3 Rxc3 25. Rhd1 $18) 23. Bxg7 Qxg7 24. Qg4 Re8 25. Qg5 Bc6 26. Qh6 Qh8 27. b3 Nxa3 28. Rh3 Bd7 29. Rg3 Qf6 30. Rh1 Re7 31. Qh4 Qg7 32. Nd5 Rf7 33. Qd8+ Qf8 34. Qxa5 Nxc2 1-0

Coming back from a loss is never easy and Karjakin by doing that showed that he is a real fighter

“I have invitations for the rest of 2016, so I am not worried.” – Veselin Topalov

Audio interview with Sergey Karjakin – he was too tired for video

Fabiano Caruana – Levon Aronian 0.5-0.5

After yesterday’s defeat to Peter Svidler it seemed as if Levon would not be at his best. But it turned out that the defeat had pretty much no effect on the Armenian’s mood and he was very much in a creative frame of mind.

Caruana has just taken the knight on f6. The normal move would have been to take on f6 back with the bishop. But Levon was in a creative mood and instead played 17…dxc3. This was a pawn sacrifice as White could take the pawn with 18.Bxe5. But Levon was looking forward to exactly this position. Making use of the awkward position of the rook on a2 he got quite a bit of counterplay. “I didn’t think the compensation for the pawn was enough, but the sacrifice was very interesting”, said Caruana after the game. Nearing the 40th move Aronian got a chance to execute one of the most beautiful combinations of his life.

Fabiano’s last move Rb1-a1 turned out to be a huge error. Black could have now sacrificed his rook with 38…Rxd3!! and won the game. The variations after the sacrifice are not so easy to calculate, and perhaps with more time Levon could have understood how powerful it was. In the game, however, he went for 38…Qc5, but the critical moment had passed and Caruana was able to hold. You can find the complete analysis of this sacrifice in the notes to the game below.

Aronian’s expression when he was shown that 38…Rxd3 was winning

[Event "Candidates 2016"] [Site "Moscow, Russia"] [Date "2016.03.25"] [Round "12"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C77"] [WhiteElo "2794"] [BlackElo "2786"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "133"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. Nc3 d6 9. a3 Na5 10. Ba2 Be6 11. b4 (11. Bxe6 fxe6 12. b4 {was played by the same players in Sinquefield Cup 2014.}) 11... Bxa2 12. Rxa2 Nc6 13. Bg5 {Until now we are following the game Anand-Aronian and Dominguez-Tomashevsky but now Aronian deviates.} Nd7 14. Be3 Nf6 15. Qb1 {Angling for a4.} d5 16. Bg5 d4 17. Bxf6 dxc3 $5 {This was an interesting pawn sacrifice. Caruana didn't think too highly of this move at first but later realised that it was tricky. He commended his opponent for his play after the game.} (17... Bxf6 18. Nd5 a5 { was a normal way to continue.}) 18. Bxe5 Nxe5 19. Nxe5 Qd6 20. Ng4 $5 (20. Nf3 $5 a5 21. Ra1 $14) (20. f4 {was what Aronian thought was the most natural move. } Bf6 21. Kh1 Bxe5 22. fxe5 Qxe5 23. Rf5 Qd6 24. Ra1 {Black has regained the pawn but White has much better structure and stands better.}) 20... a5 21. Ne3 c6 22. a4 $5 (22. Nf5 Qe6 23. Nxe7+ Qxe7 24. Ra1 {Would not be sufficient compensation for Black for the pawn as after} axb4 25. Qxb4 $1 $16 {There is no way to regain the pawn.}) 22... axb4 23. axb5 cxb5 24. Nd5 Rfb8 25. Nxe7+ $2 {A pretty poor move which reduces all of White's advantage. It was better to keep the knight on d5 as it is not possible to dislodge it from there.} (25. Rxa8 Rxa8 26. d4) 25... Qxe7 26. Qb3 h5 (26... Ra3 27. Rxa3 bxa3 28. Ra1 b4 29. Rxa3 bxa3 30. Qxb8+ Qf8 31. Qb7 g6 $11) 27. Rfa1 Rxa2 28. Qxa2 Qc5 29. Rb1 Rd8 30. h3 g6 31. Qb3 Rd4 {The position is round about equal.} 32. Re1 Qa7 33. Kf1 {This plan of centralizing the king looks pretty dubious. Maybe it was better to just stay put. The position is equal.} Kg7 34. Ke2 h4 35. Rd1 Qa5 36. Rb1 Qa6 37. Kf1 Qd6 38. Ra1 $2 {A careless move by Caruana. Aronian had a winning move here, which could have been of the most brilliant combinations of the entire tournament!} (38. Re1 $11) 38... Qc5 $2 (38... Rxd3 $3 {Unbelievable as it may seem, this rook sacrifice is made not for an immediate finish but to clear the path for the queenside pawns which just cannot be stopped!} 39. cxd3 Qxd3+ 40. Ke1 (40. Kg1 $2 Qc4 $3 $19 {And the pawns are just cruising with b3-c2 etc.}) 40... Qxe4+ 41. Kf1 (41. Kd1 c2+ $1 42. Qxc2 Qd4+ $19) 41... Qd3+ 42. Ke1 Qd2+ 43. Kf1 c2 44. Qb2+ Kh7 {The king is safe here and now the next threat is b3, b4 followed by Qc3!} 45. Kg1 b3 46. Rf1 (46. Kh2 Qf4+ 47. Kg1 b4 $19) (46. Qxb3 c1=Q+) 46... Qf4 $19 (46... b4 $2 47. Qxb3 c1=Q 48. Qxf7+ $11)) 39. Rb1 Qa7 40. Ke2 g5 $6 {This move weakens the kingside a bit and it was quite a drastic decision to make especially on the 40th move.} 41. Rg1 Qd7 42. Ra1 Qe7 43. Ra6 Qc7 44. Ra8 Qf4 45. Ra1 g4 (45... Rxd3 {is similar to the previous Rxd3 variation. The only difference is that the pawn is on g5 and this is the thing which allows White to hold.} 46. cxd3 Qd2+ 47. Kf1 Qxd3+ 48. Kg1 Qc4 49. Qd1 c2 50. Qc1 $1 {Attacking the g5 pawn. This is the crucial tempo.} (50. Qh5 c1=Q+) 50... Kh6 (50... f6 51. e5 $1) (50... Kg6 51. Ra6+ Kh5 52. g4+ hxg3 53. fxg3 Qe2 54. Qb2 (54. g4+ Kh4 55. Rh6+ Kg3 $19) 54... Qe1+ 55. Kg2 Qe2+ $11) 51. Qb2 $11) 46. hxg4 Qxg4+ 47. Ke3 (47. Kf1 h3 48. gxh3 Qxh3+ 49. Ke2 Qg4+ 50. Ke3 Rd6 51. Qxb4 Rf6 $2 (51... Qh3+ $11) 52. Kd4 $1 $18) 47... Rd6 48. Qxb4 Qg5+ 49. Ke2 Rf6 $1 (49... Qd2+ 50. Kf1 Rf6 51. Qc5 $11) 50. Qxc3 Qxg2 51. Qd4 h3 (51... Qf3+ 52. Ke1 (52. Kd2 h3) 52... h3 {forces White to be extremely accurate.} 53. e5 Re6 54. Qe4 Qxe4+ 55. dxe4 Rxe5 56. Kf1 Rxe4 57. Kg1 {With a probable draw.}) 52. Qe3 Qg4+ 53. Kd2 (53. f3 Qg2+ 54. Qf2 Rg6 55. Qxg2 Rxg2+ 56. Kf1 Rxc2 57. Kg1 $11) 53... Qg2 54. Ke2 Qg4+ 55. Kd2 h2 56. Rh1 Qg2 57. Qg3+ Qxg3 58. fxg3 Rf2+ 59. Kc3 {This is a complicated endgame. Although the evaluation is equal, White is the one who has to be careful. He must create counterplay before the Black king reaches to g3.} Kf6 60. d4 Kg5 ( 60... Rg2 61. Kb4 Rxc2 62. Kxb5 $11) 61. d5 Kf6 (61... Kg4 62. d6 Kxg3 63. d7 $18) 62. g4 Ke5 63. g5 b4+ 64. Kxb4 Rxc2 65. Kb5 Kd6 66. Kb4 Ke5 67. Kb5 { No improvement can be made and the game ends in a draw. A very interesting battle.} 1/2-1/2

Currently co-leading with 7.0/12, will he be Magnus Carlsen's next challenger?!

Peter Svidler – Anish Giri 0.5-0.5

Svidler began the game with 1.c4 and Anish played the solid reversed Sicilian setup with …e5,…Nf6 and …d5. Black got a good position out of the opening and had comfortably equalized. “The problem with such positions is that even if your opponent make twenty errors, yet it is well within the drawing zone”, is how Anish described the game. Peter didn’t play the best possible moves on many occasions but his moves were always decent. As a result Anish always had an edge but it never transformed into something tangible.

The result was a drawn rook ending which Giri pressed on for nearly an hour. Of course, he wanted to delay the moment when he would have a dozen consecutive draws to his name! In the end it was a draw and both the players are now on 50% with 6.0/12.

[Event "Candidates 2016"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.03.25"] [Round "12"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2757"] [BlackElo "2793"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "169"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7 8. a3 O-O 9. b4 Be6 10. Rb1 (10. b5 Nd4 11. Nxe5 Bb3 $19) 10... f6 11. d3 { In this position Black has two ways to continue. One is to go directly Nd4 and other one is to include a5 and b5 before playing Nd4. Anish chooses the latter. } a5 12. b5 Nd4 13. Nd2 Qc8 14. e3 Nf5 15. Qc2 a4 16. Rd1 Nd6 $146 {The first new move of the game but it seemed as if both were already out of their preparation. The plans in this position are pretty well established and both the players are following them. A move here or there doesn't really change the character of the game.} 17. Nde4 $5 {An interesting idea by Peter who doesn't mind giving up an exchange to Bb3.} Nxe4 18. Nxe4 (18. dxe4 Bb3 19. Rxb3 axb3 20. Qxb3+ Kh8 {With the bishop closed on g2 this doesn't look great.}) 18... Bd5 {Giri is always well aware of the dangers and chooses the most solid way to play.} (18... Bb3 $6 {This wins an exchange but gives White excellent light square control.} 19. Rxb3 axb3 20. Qxb3+ $44) 19. Nc5 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 Bxc5 21. Qxc5 Qe6 $1 {At this point the position might be round about equal but it seems like Black has much easier play thanks to his knight having more scope against the bishop.} 22. Bb2 (22. Qxc7 $2 Nd5 23. Qc2 Rfc8 $19 {With the knight coming to c3 it is just winning for Black.}) (22. e4 {Svidler wanted to play this but was afraid of} f5 {White should be fine after} 23. Bb2 $13) 22... Rf7 23. Bc3 Rd7 24. Bb4 Rad8 25. e4 f5 26. exf5 $6 (26. Rbc1 {was better.}) 26... Qxf5 {Black has some initiative now because White's kingside is a tad weak.} 27. Re1 Nd5 $1 (27... Qxd3 28. Rbd1 $36) (27... Rxd3 28. Qxc7 $16) 28. Qc4 Rf7 29. Rb2 h6 (29... Qf3+ {According to the computer this was the best move Giri had seen it but he wasn't sure if it was any good.} 30. Kg1 Nxb4 31. Qxb4 Rd4 (31... Rxd3 32. Qxa4 $11) 32. Qc5 Rxd3 $17 {According to the computer this is just better but Anish thought this was extremely drawish.}) 30. Qe4 Qd7 31. Qxe5 Qxb5 32. Qe4 (32. Be7 Qc6 $1 {was the point missed by Peter.} 33. Bxd8 Nf4+ $19) 32... Qd7 33. Qe6 Qxe6 (33... b6 34. Qxd7 Rdxd7 35. Bd2 {With the idea of later Bf4 if the knight moves seems fine for White.}) 34. Rxe6 Nxb4 35. Rxb4 Rxd3 36. f4 (36. Rxa4 Rd2 37. Re8+ Kh7 38. Rf4 Rxf4 39. gxf4 Kg6 $15 { This might well be a draw but Peter during the game thought that this was really bad for him.}) 36... Rxa3 37. Rxb7 Ra2+ 38. Kh3 Rc2 39. Ra6 Rf5 40. Rxa4 Rh5+ 41. Kg4 Rhxh2 42. Ra8+ (42. Raa7 h5+ 43. Kg5 Rc3 44. Rxc7 Rxg3+ 45. Kf5 Kh7 $17) 42... Kh7 43. Rbb8 Rc4 $1 {A strong move by Anish which keeps the game going although it should be a draw.} 44. Rf8 (44. Re8 {was surely better to keep the option of giving a check on e6.} Kg6 45. Re6+ Kf7 46. Rae8 $11) 44... Kg6 45. Rae8 h5+ 46. Kf3 Rcc2 47. Re6+ Kh7 48. Re3 Rhf2+ 49. Ke4 Rc6 50. Rf5 Kh6 51. Rd5 (51. Re5 $2 h4 52. gxh4 Rc4+ 53. Kd3 Rfxf4 54. h5 Rfd4+ 55. Ke2 Rc2+ 56. Kf3 Rh4 $19) 51... h4 52. gxh4 Rc4+ 53. Kd3 Rfxf4 (53... Rcxf4 54. Re6+ Rf6 55. Rxf6+ Rxf6 56. Rc5 c6 57. Ke4 $11) 54. Re6+ Kh7 55. Rh5+ (55. Re7 {was the easier way to draw.} Rxh4 56. Rdd7 Rhg4 57. Rxg7+ Rxg7 58. Rxg7+ Kxg7 59. Kxc4 $11) 55... Kg8 56. Re7 Rfd4+ 57. Ke3 Rd1 58. Ke2 Rg1 59. Rg5 Rxg5 60. hxg5 Kh7 (60... Kf8 61. Rd7 Re4+ 62. Kf3 Re7 {is also drawn but there are some more chances.}) 61. Ke3 Kg6 62. Rd7 {The rest of the game is not so important. White has sufficient defensive resources and Anish kept trying to avoid his 12th draw which was inevitable!} Rc5 63. Re7 Rc1 64. Kd2 Rc6 65. Ke2 Rc3 66. Kd2 Rc4 67. Kd3 Rc5 68. Ke3 c6 69. Rc7 Re5+ 70. Kf4 Rf5+ 71. Ke4 Rf1 72. Ke3 Re1+ 73. Kf3 Rc1 74. Kg4 Rc3 75. Kf4 Rc4+ 76. Kf3 Rc2 77. Kg4 Rc1 78. Kf4 c5 79. Kg4 c4 80. Rc6+ Kf7 81. Kf5 Rf1+ 82. Ke5 Re1+ 83. Kf5 g6+ 84. Kf4 Rf1+ 85. Ke4 1/2-1/2

“Yes, that is a good move! It will allow you to equalize as White!” Anish with his typical witty
remarks even after seven hours of play

“After the number of mistakes I have made I think I shouldn’t give any opinions at this point”
Peter Svidler after the game!

26th of March is the final rest day of the tournament. The best thing about this year’s Candidates, unlike the previous edition in 2014, is that there is absolutely no way to tell who would be the winner. Caruana and Karjakin are the favourites, but if Anand beats Giri tomorrow then he is also in with a chance. As for Giri, Aronian and Svidler, a 2.0/2 is the only way in which they can realistically think about winning this tournament. Two exciting days of chess lie ahead and who knows, in case of a tiebreak, three!

Wondering why this report doesn’t contain images of anyone apart from the players? It’s because you will soon be treated to a pictorial report from Moscow by our photographer at the venue Amruta Mokal.

Standings after twelve rounds

Pairings and results

Round 1, Friday 11 March 2016
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Svidler Peter
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Giri Anish
½-½
Aronian Levon
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Round 2, Saturday 12 March 2016
Svidler Peter ½-½ Topalov Veselin
Aronian Levon ½-½ Anand Viswanathan
Caruana Fabiano ½-½ Giri Anish
Karjakin Sergey 1-0 Nakamura Hikaru
Round 3, Sunday 13 March 2016
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Svidler Peter
Giri Anish
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Topalov Veselin
0-1
Aronian Levon
Rest day, Monday 14 March 2016
Round 4, Tuesday 15 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Aronian Levon
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Karjakin Sergey
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Giri Anish
Round 5, Wed. 16 March 2016
Giri Anish ½-½ Svidler Peter
Anand Viswanathan ½-½ Nakamura Hikaru
Topalov Veselin ½-½ Karjakin Sergey
Aronian Levon ½-½ Caruana Fabiano
Round 6, Thursday 17 March 2016
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Svidler Peter
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Giri Anish
Aronian Levon
1-0
Nakamura Hikaru
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Rest day, Friday 18 March 2016
Round 7, Saturday 19 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Aronian Levon
Nakamura Hikaru
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Giri Anish
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
 
Round 8, Sunday 20 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Caruana Fabiano
1-0
Nakamura Hikaru
Aronian Levon
½-½
Giri Anish
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Round 9, Monday 21 March 2016
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Svidler Peter
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Aronian Levon
Giri Anish
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Rest day, Tuesday 22 March 2016
Round 10, Wed. 23 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Nakamura Hikaru
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Giri Anish
Caruana Fabiano
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Aronian Levon
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Round 11, Thursday 24 March 2016
Aronian Levon
0-1
Svidler Peter
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Karjakin Sergey
Giri Anish
½-½
Nakamura Hikaru
Round 12, Friday 25 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Giri Anish
Nakamura Hikaru
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Karjakin Sergey
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Aronian Levon
Rest day, Saturday 26 March 2016
Round 13, Sunday 27 March 2016
Caruana Fabiano   Svidler Peter
Aronian Levon   Karjakin Sergey
Topalov Veselin   Nakamura Hikaru
Anand Viswanathan   Giri Anish
Round 14, Monday 28 March 2016
Svidler Peter   Anand Viswanathan
Giri Anish   Topalov Veselin
Nakamura Hikaru   Aronian Levon
Karjakin Sergey   Caruana Fabiano

Roundup broadcasts

ChessBase is doing roundup shows at the end of each round of the Candidates.

Here is the full schedule of future broadcasts – you need to be a premium member to watch

Roundup Commentary Schedule

Date Day Round English German
24.03.2016 Thursday Round 11 Simon Williams Klaus Bischoff
25.03.2016 Friday Round 12 Daniel King Oliver Reeh/Karsten Müller
26.03.2016 Saturday Free day Summary Yannick Pelletier  
27.03.2016 Sunday Round 13 Daniel King Klaus Bischoff
28.03.2016 Monday Round 14 Yannick Pelletier Klaus Bischoff

Links



Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register

chesspartzer chesspartzer 3/27/2016 03:52
@VVI Anand has made all his fan proud! At his age, he has not only demonstrate that he is capable to compete with the young guns but also win decisively against them. Please use a rational mind to comment, not an oxymoron who just want some attention. Win or lose, Anand has showcase a line of spectacular games throughout the tournament. Well Done the TIGER!
Rational Rational 3/27/2016 01:58
@anairio Well it would be nice if the 2016 match could be on top of the WTC like the 1995 match , unfortunately........
fons fons 3/27/2016 09:50
@ Darkergreen1327, banem

The reporter is from India. India still has the caste system. They are used to dividing people into higher caste, lower caste etc. Maybe that has something to do with it.
anairo anairo 3/27/2016 08:42
Nobody is choked that the World Championship could be host in the Trump headquarters? Seriously I just will renounce to look at it!
vinniethepooh vinniethepooh 3/27/2016 04:13
Karjakin wins if he has two draws and even Vishy manages to win one as Caruana has better tie against Vishy but Karjakin is ahead of Caruana in most number of wins.So 1st Karjakin 2nd Caruana 3rd Anand.In particular Vishy doesn't have any chance now.However it would be exciting to follow the leaders encounter in the last round.Thank you for all the reports.
Rational Rational 3/27/2016 12:09
It would be interesting if anyone has any reasons why Carlsen 12-0 Nakamura. Nakamura 7-1 Anand.
Yet While Carlsen is better than Anand he's not anywhere near as much as a line of form would suggest.
jyzhong jyzhong 3/26/2016 11:55
Oh c'mon Vishy! Don't lose to Naka again. Why must you lose to him for the 7th time in classical chess. You've beaten MC so many times, surely you can do better than to get crushed by someone who lost 12-0 to MC!
jyzhong jyzhong 3/26/2016 11:54
Vishy had just made his life a lot more harder by losing for the seventh time in classical chess against Naka. He's only beaten Naka once! He's got to seriously shake up if he want to have a shot at Magnus again, who trumped Naka 12-0.
Mithrull Mithrull 3/26/2016 10:40
Rumors spreading that Giri prepared for the tournament by thorough analysis of the games of Ulf Andersson interspersed with breaks to play Tic-Tac-Toe against computer.
handikap handikap 3/26/2016 05:48
>Stupido

Which comment regarding Lékó (not Leko...there are several places on the internet from where one can copy his name correctly) was about bashing him?
LetsReason LetsReason 3/26/2016 05:08
" FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov has hinted that the World Championship in November might take place in the Trump Tower in New York!"

Yep. That is about right. Those two being bedfellows makes sense.
Stupido Stupido 3/26/2016 04:09
That Leko bashing is out of place. He has played more than a few fine attacking games, including during the WCh match.
KevinC KevinC 3/26/2016 03:46
@vladivaclav, Yes, that match would be the first to win takes the entire match. <Kosteniuk commenting on the game>: "We are now into game 737, with the match tied at 368, and Giri has white...."
vladivaclav vladivaclav 3/26/2016 11:41
Imagine match between Leko in his prime and Giri. What a clash of titans that would be :)
handikap handikap 3/26/2016 09:03
>Pionki

Giri it is indeed consistent, new Drawcula in town. I'm wondering: Does his hidden second is by any chances Péter Lékó? :-)
Pionki Pionki 3/26/2016 06:30
The only consistent player in this tournament is Giri. I don't see any of these guys facing the world champion.
akhilcr666 akhilcr666 3/26/2016 05:29
anand will win the candidate tournament...!! come on vishy...!!!
gurpreet7 gurpreet7 3/26/2016 05:22
i also dont want carlsen v anand
sicilian_D sicilian_D 3/26/2016 04:14
a lot of other Anand fans have written most of what I would have. Followed the game and the only 2 questions I had were: a. last guy beat you with c4, so why did you come unprepared? and b. if u had to play it, why 1. ... e5?

So it's almost like u want the White Anand and an equally good slow grinding Black (I am talking of a combination of 2 players) to take on Carlsen to have draw/win chances!!

Good luck to Anand, but here's also good luck that OTHER games go your way~
jajalamapratapri jajalamapratapri 3/26/2016 02:55
I hope chessbase can negotiate a deal with Agon to get a moves feed for November. I'm getting carpal tunnel syndrome from cutting and pasting the moves from worldchess.com to my chessbase software during the games. It would be much more convenient if this was done automatically as usual and I would still follow the video on the official site. If chessbase has to hand over cash to Agon for this it would be ok to charge chessbase users for this (as already done previously for the chessbase commentaries) and I'll be happy to pay.

From the cloud computer deep evaluations on supercomputers I see many people are doing this copy/paste.

I fail to see how Agon can make money from making chess fans suffer like this. I'm definitely not going to buy a gangster BMW and my kids produce better animated drawing videos in elementary school than Agon.

Only positive thing is the commentators on worldchess which I like a lot, at least when they are not forced to answer moronic twitters during a critical period in a decisive game. But, I guess it doesn't hurt to repeat, I would follow this also when I could see the games on chessbase in the usual fashion.
abhayanniya abhayanniya 3/26/2016 02:54
shut up bondsegrey
banem banem 3/26/2016 02:52
Darkergreen1327 wrote 2 hours ago
"Elite players walking on the same streets like common public" says the title of the video report up here! Is this the level of journalism chessbase is moving towards? Anyways...

I was about to say exact same thing, rarely pointless video. I guess someone is just a little bit too excited...
jajalamapratapri jajalamapratapri 3/26/2016 02:39
I think when Giri digests the lesson from his first candidates tournament he'll be able to play without ever losing and converting the winning positions he already knows how to get without taking risk. He's very young and is still getting stronger.

Derogatory remarks are easily written by those without more than a superficial understanding of chess, but his playing style is not drawish and/or boring at all; he just messes up when it's time to convert his advantage to a full point.

As far as all the nasty remarks about him being arrogant; he's just not shy about telling the audience what he thinks (which is the purpose of these post-mortems, right?) and doesn't like to waste time by adding "in my opinion", "I could be wrong", "maybe", "how about...", to every sentence.

Even if you hate him you must admit he's at least interesting to listen to.
firestorm firestorm 3/26/2016 02:32
Regarding the criticism of the commentators, they are both very good imho- they see and show lines very quickly, and whilst they don't play down to the LCD of possible viewers, their comments and variations are sharp and well explained. Just occasionally they discuss variations without showing them, but as Ian said, the commentating lasts several hours- not easy. Imho Ian gives very good, concise opinions about positions and lines, and after all- that's what he is there for- he's a top player with a great deal of insight into the game, so his saying "I don't like this" etc is actually pretty meaningful, when backed up with the analysis and lines.

Keep going both, please- really good commentaries.
Deep_Port Deep_Port 3/26/2016 02:26
What's that silly computer saying now about its prediction? hmm?

@Rational's 50% Giri .. LOL

Go Caruana!
Zdrak Zdrak 3/26/2016 01:47
As a fantasy only, imagine this:

Round 13:
Anand-Giri 1/2
Caruana-Svidler 0-1
Aronian-Karjakin 1-0
Topalov-Nakamura 0-1

Round 14:
Svidler-Anand 1/2
Giri-Topalov 1-0
Karjakin-Caruana 1/2
Nakamura-Aronian either 1/2 or 1-0

This leaves a monstrous six-way tie, with Anand, Svidler, Giri, Caruana, Karjakin and (Aronian or Nakamura) all at 7.5/14. Tiebreaks are left as an exercise for the reader ;-)
jollyfellow jollyfellow 3/26/2016 01:26
hmmm - no live broadcast from Chessbase and no explanation from them either - or am I missing something?
Peter B Peter B 3/26/2016 01:11
The tie break situation is very interesting and complicated. The order is (1) head to head (2) number of wins, (3) SB tie break. As it stands, Karjakin leads Caruana because he has more wins. But if Anand somehow joins them, the leader would be Caruana, because in the 3-way head-to-head, Caruana has a win over Anand. Caruana would beat Anand in a 2-way tie due to head-to-head, but Anand would beat Karjakin in a 2-way tie due to more wins. Even more complications if someone else bolts in. We'll have a better idea after round 13.
Simplifier20 Simplifier20 3/26/2016 12:59
If Giri's incredible streak continues on the last 2 remaining rounds, then he is indeed undoubtedly the Undisputed King of all Draws!!
depsipeptide@gmail.com depsipeptide@gmail.com 3/26/2016 12:50
Svidler-Giri: Both sides played the fashionable reversed Sicilian Dragon too correctly to generate winning chances. For two players on 50%, a draw was the just result.
Caruana-Aronian: Levon says he plays the Berlin for a win and the Marshall for a draw. Interesting that he headed for the Marshall today although Caruana sidestepped with d3. Fabiano looked better out of the opening but then drifted into passivity. Not clear if Levon missed a win in the subsequent Q + R endgame.
Karjakin-Topalov: Thanks to Veselin, the Najdorf made a rare appearance. He didn't react accurately against Sergey's Keres Attack and went down in flames. Topalov and Giri remain the only candidates without a win.
Nakamura-Anand: Game of the round. The Americans have sensed a weak spot in Anand's English opening. First Fabiano and now Hikaru have won one sided games with the same variation. In this tournament, Anand has been clinically efficient in converting the positions in which he's been better. But you also need to save half points by doggedly defending inferior positions and he's been terrible at that. Overall +1 is still a credit to the middle aged Indian and he's won more games than Aronian, Giri and Svidler put together!
TMMM TMMM 3/26/2016 12:46
Great to see Anand lose; at least the chances of another Carlsen v Anand match have significantly reduced now. Let's just hope he does not win again on Sunday.
Truthbe Truthbe 3/26/2016 12:43
In round 10 when Anand lost Caruana, I said it's the day of reckoning; Anand's long exemplary legacy ended and Caruana would be the winner. Sergey is nowhere close to top league of Carlsen, Anand, and the emerging Caruana. Look forward to Carlsen-Caruna Match. I hope Anand will be one of the seconds of Caruana in the World Championship match.
vladivaclav vladivaclav 3/26/2016 12:37
Incredible Giri's streak continues. Can it last for 2 more rounds?
Darkergreen1327 Darkergreen1327 3/26/2016 12:30
"Elite players walking on the same streets like common public" says the title of the video report up here! Is this the level of journalism chessbase is moving towards? Anyways...
Mithrull Mithrull 3/26/2016 12:24
What does Giri like to to in his spare time?

Draw.
Simplifier20 Simplifier20 3/25/2016 11:07
Anish is indeed the King of all Draws!!
bobbybishop bobbybishop 3/25/2016 10:23
@MaxMinus "but to have a player not to play?" I don't understand what that means.
magicalpony magicalpony 3/25/2016 10:15
Nakamura will strike back with two more wins
Fianshetto Fianshetto 3/25/2016 10:07
Who exactly decided Nepomniachtchi would be a good commentator ? Both the games' analyses and the commenting is painfully boring....Maurice Ashley please take their place..
John Maccormack John Maccormack 3/25/2016 10:05
Please post Karjakin game. You have Nakamura posted twice! JXM