Candidates Rd12: Time is running out

by Alejandro Ramirez
3/27/2014 – Mamedyarov risked against Karjakin, and although it almost backfired neither side gained a full point. Topalov beat Svidler, but is far from the lead. Anand almost cemented his tournament win by playing an exciting attack against Andreikin who saw himself in the defensive early on. However the fireworks were too much for him and the draw was agreed in a winning position.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The FIDE Candidates Tournament is taking place in Khanty-Mansiysk (Russia). The first round will start on Thursday, March 13 at 3 p.m. local time, the final round is on Sunday, March 30, 2014. The event is a double round robin (14 rounds). The time control is 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 and 15 minutes for the rest of the game plus an additional 30 seconds per move starting from move 61.

The tournament will determine the challenger who will face the reigning World Champion Magnus Carlsen in a title match later this year. The prize fund is 600,000 Euros (= US $832,000), the first place 135,000 and last (8th) place 25,000 Euros.

Round Twelve

Round twelve – 27.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Andreikin Dmitry
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Topalov Veselin
1-0
Svidler Peter
Aronian Levon
½-½
Kramnik Vladimir

Daniel King shows the game Anand vs Andreikin

Anand, Viswanathan ½-½ Andreikin, Dmitry

If by some disaster Anand doesn't win the Candidates, he has this game to blame

[Event "FIDE Candidates Tournament 2014"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2014.03.27"] [Round "12"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Andreikin, Dmitry"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B19"] [WhiteElo "2770"] [BlackElo "2709"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [EventCountry "RUS"] {Most people expected this game to not be much of a fight. Anand would be happy with a draw, Andreikin was no longerp laying for anything in the tournament. They could not have been more wrong.} 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 {The traditional way of battling the Caro-Kann has not been as popular of late, losing some ground to 3.e5. However it is still a dangerous system for Black.} 7. Nf3 e6 8. Ne5 Bh7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 Nd7 11. f4 Bb4+ 12. c3 Be7 13. Bd2 Ngf6 14. O-O-O O-O 15. Qf3 (15. Ne4 {was Anand-Carlsen from last year's World Championship, a game in which the Indian player had some real chances to put pressure on.}) 15... Qc7 16. c4 {Andreikin had to come up with some interesting idea now as White has effectively prevented d5.} a5 $5 (16... c5 $2 17. d5 $1 {The tactics work out for White.} Nxe5 (17... exd5 18. Nf5 Bd8 19. Qg3 Nh5 20. Nxh6+ Kh7 21. Qd3+ $1 {And White's attack is decisive.}) 18. fxe5 Qxe5 19. Bf4 $18 {traps the queen.}) 17. Kb1 Rad8 18. Bc1 {White's position just looks preferable to me. His central control and potential threats on the kingside make his plans very obvious. Black needs to create counterplay but it doesn't seem obvious how he will accomplish this, despite the fact that he can push his a-pawn all the way to a3.} a4 19. Rhe1 a3 20. b3 Bb4 21. Re3 {on e3 the rooks is better placed than on d1 as it can now potentially swing to g3.} c5 22. d5 $1 {Black finally committed to c5 and the fireworks begin.} exd5 23. cxd5 (23. Nf5 $5 d4 {is not necessary, but not might also be good for White. He intends to simply block this pawn with Nd3 and proceed with kingside pressure.}) 23... Nb6 24. Red3 { White has two ideas: push his d-pawn and put a knight on f5 and threaten checkmate. Black has to deal with both while creating play on the other side of the board.} Qc8 $6 {Logical, but too passive.} (24... Nbxd5 $5 25. Rxd5 Nxd5 26. Rxd5 Rxd5 27. Qxd5 Rd8 28. Qf3 f6 29. Nc4 Qd7 $13 {might not be as bad for Black as one would think at first.}) 25. d6 Rfe8 26. Nh5 $1 {Most precise. The knight on f6 is the only defender of the kingside and now the position starts becoming dicey for Black.} Re6 27. Nxf6+ $6 {Anand now misses a series of immediate wins.} (27. d7 $1 Nbxd7 (27... Nfxd7 28. Qg4 $1 g6 29. Nxf7 $1 Kxf7 30. f5 $1 $18 {White crashes through in every variation as the Knight cannot return to its defensive post.}) (27... Qc7 28. f5 $3 Rxe5 29. Nxf6+ gxf6 30. Bxh6 $18 {and Black's king is defenseless.}) 28. Nxf6+ $18) 27... Rxf6 28. d7 ( 28. Ng4 $1 Re6 (28... Nd7 29. Nxf6+ Nxf6 {is simply an exchange.}) 29. f5 Ree8 30. Nxh6+ {is completely miserable for Black.}) 28... Qc7 29. Qg4 c4 $1 { Andreikin finds some sort of counterplay, but to be fair Anand has still played well enough taht he has a winning advantage.} 30. Rg3 $1 g6 31. h5 $1 { Ignoring the threats! White's attack is much quicker} cxb3 32. Rxb3 $1 {The rook has a beautiful defensive job. the d7 pawn stops Black from coordinating on the c-file.} Na4 {The best practical chance.} 33. hxg6 fxg6 34. Rxb4 $1 Nc3+ 35. Kc2 $1 (35. Ka1 Nxd1 36. Rc4 Qd6 $13) 35... b5 $1 {Posing problems.} (35... Nxd1+ 36. Rc4 $1 Qd6 37. Qxd1 $18 {Here White's material advantage has been consolidated.}) 36. Kb3 Na4 {Black has a threat now, and Anand doesn't cope with it in the best way. Time pressure took its toll.} 37. Qf3 (37. Bd2 $1 { This leaves Black without any real threats} Nc5+ 38. Kxa3 Ra6+ 39. Kb2 Qa5 40. a4 $1 {Not the only winning move, but the most exact.} Nxa4+ 41. Kc1 $1 Qc7+ 42. Kb1 {Black is out of checks and the game is over.}) 37... Nc5+ 38. Kc2 Na4+ 39. Kb3 Nc5+ 40. Kc2 Na4+ 41. Kb3 {If I could give a question mark to a result, this would be it. There was no need for White to take a draw. However with the tournament situation and the immense amount of fireworks of this game it is clear that Anand just wanted his half point secure.} (41. Kd2 Qd6+ 42. Nd3 Rf7 $1 {With Rfxd7 looming this might still be risky, but surely a computer can find a way to hold it.}) (41. Rc4 $1 {The best way} bxc4 42. Bxa3 {Now White has decsive threats of his own, not of which the least is Be7. It is not clear how to respond to this, but White's king is still in optical danger. The truth may be that it is impossible for Black to organize himself and White is just winning in this position. A crazy adventure.}) 1/2-1/2

Andreikin barely survived today

Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar ½-½ Karjakin, Sergey
Mamedyarov employed an ultra sharp variation of the Nimzo-Indian. The game was wild from the beginning, with White's strong pawn center collapsing quickly but leaving Black with an exposed king and an underdeveloped position, despite being up two pawns. White's initiative was eventually enough to regain one pawn and simplify just enough pieces to reach a drawn double rook endgame, but the ride there was certainly a wild one. The game could have gone either way in many junctures but it seems that the accuracy of both players was enough to sustain the draw.

Mamedyarov went to risk it all, he almost got burned but survived

Topalov, Veselin 1-0 Svidler, Peter

A small comeback a little too late

Grandmaster Cristian Chirila will follow up with full analysis of Topalov's second tournament victory, and Topalov's revenge against Svidler.

[Event "Candidates 2014"] [Site "?"] [Date "2014.03.27"] [Round "12"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B49"] [WhiteElo "2785"] [BlackElo "2758"] [Annotator "Chirila Cristian"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [SourceDate "2014.01.04"] {I enjoy analyzing Topalov's games, despite the fact that he did not show his best form in this tournament, he still manages to prove he is one of the most dynamic "gladiator" in the chess colosseum.} 1. e4 {Topalov decides not to check Svidler's Grunfeld, arguably one of the best in the world.} c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 {And we have a Taimanov Sicilian on the board, nowadays this is one of the most fashionable try for Black. One of the reasons this opening is so popular is the extraordinary amount of choiches that black has at its disposal, this can sometimes prove very confusing for an opponent that is not very familiar with the opening} 7. Be2 { the "quiet" approach} (7. Qd2 Nf6 8. O-O-O Be7 (8... Bb4 9. f3 d5 10. a3 Bxc3 11. Qxc3 dxe4 12. fxe4 Nxe4 13. Qd3 $14 {white has very strong compensation due to his pair of bishops and better development}) 9. f3 b5 10. Kb1 Nxd4 11. Bxd4 Bb7 {This is considered to be the main line, many games have been played and the position seems to remain balanced with a small edge for white.}) 7... b5 {Black delays his piece development in order to pressure the center} (7... Nf6 {is the main line} 8. O-O Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 (9... Nxe4 10. Nxc6 Qxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Qd4 $16) 10. c4 {White has very good results recently in this line, I'm sure Svidler did not want to test Topa's theoretical knowledge in the main lines}) 8. Nxc6 dxc6 (8... Qxc6 9. e5 $5 Bb7 10. Bf3 Qc7 11. Bxb7 Qxb7 12. Qd3 f5 13. O-O-O $13) 9. a4 b4 10. Nb1 Nf6 11. Nd2 c5 12. f3 Bb7 13. Nc4 {I personally prefer white, I think his opening was a success. Both black bishops are having a difficult time finding a purpose, while white established a great outpost on c4 from where he will control many important squares. Black will at some point try to free his white square bishop with a6-a5, but after that the knight on c4 will get a new target to attack} Nd7 14. Qc1 Be7 15. O-O O-O 16. Bf4 e5 17. Bg3 h6 18. c3 a5 19. Qc2 Ba6 20. Rfd1 {It is clear who has the easier game, it is quite difficult for black to find an active plan, most of his pieces are tied to the defense} Rfd8 21. b3 {preparing Ne3 with devastating effects} (21. Ne3 $6 {trying to exchange the bishop and obtain full control of white squares was a good idea, nevertheless Svidler had some tactical resources that did not allow white to follow with this plan} b3 $1 22. Qd2 Nb6 23. Nd5 Nxd5 24. exd5 c4 $13) (21. Bf1 $6 Bg5 22. Rd5 Bxc4 23. Bxc4 Nb6 24. Rxe5 Be3+ 25. Kh1 Rd2 $36) 21... Bg5 22. Bf2 Nf8 23. cxb4 cxb4 (23... axb4 24. Rxd8 Rxd8 25. h4 Bf4 (25... Be7 26. Ne3 Bxe2 27. Qxe2 $16) 26. Rd1 Ne6 27. g3 $16) 24. Bb6 $1 Rxd1+ 25. Rxd1 Qb8 26. Bf2 {Anybody going through the game with a computer could easily presume Topalov was not following any code of ethics, almost all his moves are first choice of the computer. Somebody must have spent many days at home analyzing this structures. The "d" file is in white's hands now.} Qc7 27. Rd5 Rc8 (27... Bxc4 28. Qxc4 Bd8 29. Rc5 Qd6 30. Qd5 Qxd5 31. exd5 $16) 28. h4 $6 (28. Rc5 $1 Qd8 29. Rxe5 Ne6 30. Rd5 Qc7 31. g3 $16) 28... Be7 29. Qd2 Rd8 $2 {now this is the real blunder, but when you are subject to pressure for the whole game, its not always easy to seize your opportunities} (29... Bxc4 $1 30. Bxc4 Rd8 31. g3 Ne6 32. Rxd8+ Nxd8 33. Qd5 $14 {white still has the upper hand, but black's defense becomes much easier. The weakness on a5 can no longer be easily attacked}) 30. Bb6 Rxd5 31. Qxd5 Qb8 32. Qxa5 {white is a completely winning} Bxc4 33. Bxc4 Qd6 34. Bf2 Qd1+ 35. Kh2 {A strong game by Topalov, with a small exeption towards the end he made all the correct moves. Going in to the last rounds it is hard to believe that anybody has any chance of catching up Anand, therefore fun games should be entertaining us in the last rounds!} 1-0

 

Cristian Chirila - Guest Commentator

Former World u-16 Champion and currently a grandmaster finishing his studies at the University of Texas at Dallas, Cristian is an ambitious chess player. Find out more about Cristian, including his chess lesson services, biography and games here.

Aronian, Levon ½-½ Kramnik, Vladimir

At -1 it is hard to conjure scenarios in which Kramnik can challenge Carlsen this year

The only game where not too much happened. Kramnik's solid choice of the Orthodox Queen's Gambit was met with the Exchange Variation and the game entered some dull waters. The players ended the game with an unnecessary repetition on move 30.

Aronian depends on Anand's result on Saturday to have any hope

A short lived draw doesn't help either player

Date Round English commentary German commentary
March 29 Round 13 Daniel King/Irina Krush Klaus Bischoff

Only a loss by Anand on Saturday will make the tournament interesting, a win by the Indian player would seal the deal, even a draw might to it depending on others' results. What will happen in a decisive thirteenth round?

Games of the round:

Click on drop-down menu for all games

Standings after eleven rounds

Photos from the official website

Schedule and results

Note: the games are played at 3 PM local time, which is 10 a.m. CET (Paris) and 5 a.m. EST (New York). Click here if you are uncertain what that means for your local time.

Round one – 13.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Andreikin Dmitry
½-½
Kramnik Vladimir
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Svidler Peter
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Aronian Levon
Round two – 14.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Kramnik Vladimir
1-0
Karjakin Sergey
Svidler Peter
1-0
Andreikin Dmitry
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Aronian Levon
1-0
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Round three – 15.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Andreikin Dmitry
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Svidler Peter
½-½
Kramnik Vladimir
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Aronian Levon
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
0-1
Anand Viswanathan
Round four – 17.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
1-0
Andreikin Dmitry
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Aronian Levon
1-0
Svidler Peter
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Kramnik Vladimir
Round five – 18.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Andreikin Dmitry
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Svidler Peter
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Kramnik Vladimir
½-½
Aronian Levon
Round six – 19.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Aronian Levon
½-½
Andreikin Dmitry
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
1-0
Svidler Peter
Topalov Veselin
1-0
Kramnik Vladimir
Round seven – 21.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Karjakin Sergey
0-1
Aronian Levon
Svidler Peter
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Kramnik Vladimir
1-0
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Andreikin Dmitry
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Round eight – 22.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Kramnik Vladimir
½-½
Andreikin Dmitry
Svidler Peter
0-1
Karjakin Sergey
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Aronian Levon
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Round nine – 23.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Karjakin Sergey
1-0
Kramnik Vladimir
Andreikin Dmitry
½-½
Svidler Peter
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
1-0
Aronian Levon
Round ten – 25.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Andreikin Dmitry
Kramnik Vladimir
0-1
Svidler Peter
Aronian Levon
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Round eleven – 26.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Andreikin Dmitry
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Svidler Peter
½-½
Aronian Levon
Kramnik Vladimir
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Round twelve – 27.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Andreikin Dmitry
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Topalov Veselin
1-0
Svidler Peter
Aronian Levon
½-½
Kramnik Vladimir
Round thirteen – 29.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Andreikin Dmitry
-
Aronian Levon
Karjakin Sergey
-
Anand Viswanathan
Svidler Peter
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Kramnik Vladimir
-
Topalov Veselin
Round fourteen – 30.03.2014, 15:00h (GMT+6)
Aronian Levon
-
Karjakin Sergey
Anand Viswanathan
-
Svidler Peter
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
-
Kramnik Vladimir
Topalov Veselin
-
Andreikin Dmitry

Playchess commentary

Date Round English commentary German commentary
March 29 Round 13 Daniel King/Irina Krush Klaus Bischoff
March 30 Round 14 Daniel King/Yasser Seirawan Klaus Bischoff

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Topics: Candidates 2014

Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register

KWRegan KWRegan 3/30/2014 06:17
Will annotator GM Chirila be so kind as to say which computer program he was using to analyze Topalov-Svidler, up to his remark at Move 26? Up thru Move 27 (a clear match), my official Multi-PV (still Rybka 3) test has Topalov matching 6-of-the-last-9, 7-of-the-last-12, 8-of-the-last-15, 11-of-the-last-18 going back to move 9, which is where my test starts. With Houdini 4 depth 17 in Single-PV mode it is similar. None of this raises any eyebrows. The computer's first move actually changes a fair bit as the search deepens; when you are doing a manual rather than objectively scripted test during annotations, it is easy to count a match at any time. There was an extreme case of this kind of confirmation trap at an open tournament last summer.
1