Baku 2.1: Fights continue!

by Alejandro Ramirez
9/14/2015 – Despite eight short draws in today's round the remaining games were full of excitement. The combination of the day was played by Ding Liren, but even some "quiet draws" like Hou Yifan-Mamedyarov were full of interest. We have seen a couple of heartbreakers in Baku, but nothing worse than Bruzon losing R+BvsR against Kramnik... ten moves away from a draw!

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World Cup

10th September – 5th October

Baku, Azerbaijan

Round Two - Game One

Arbiters on duty before every round

Security, of course, is tight

Today, eight of 32 games were drawn around move 20 and some of these draws came rather unexpected - Nakamura's early draw with White against Shankland being one example.

Shankland (left) drew easily against Nakamura and Harikrishna (right) also drew.

There were also a number of upsets. In the Chinese duel between Lu Shanglei and Wang Hao it was the lower rated player who simply crushed his opponent. Wang Hao played with Black and did not create much during the game, and when White's light-squared bishop was unleashed and Lu only had to push his pawns forward to get a massive initiative.

Anish Giri, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Fabiano Caruana and his manager,
the infamous Lawrence Trent. What is this, the Grand Chess Tour?

When playing Wei Yi with Black Vovk tried to repeat the success he had had with the French against Robson in the first round, but was duly punished by the young prodigy.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku AZE"] [Date "2015.09.14"] [Round "2.24"] [White "Wei, Yi"] [Black "Vovk, Yuri"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C11"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2015.09.11"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Be3 cxd4 8. Nxd4 Bc5 9. Qd2 O-O 10. O-O-O a6 11. Qf2 Bxd4 12. Bxd4 b5 13. Be3 Qa5 14. Kb1 b4 15. Ne2 Qc7 16. Ng3 {following a Caruana-Meier game from 2013.} (16. Nd4 { is more common and was played in Caruana-Meier in 2014.}) 16... a5 17. Nh5 f6 { A new move - the computers seem to like it but the game is still sharp. Black's attack on the queenside is growing but White already has real threats on the kingside.} 18. Qg3 Rf7 19. Bb5 $1 {I like this move with which White gets a bit of control all over the board.} fxe5 $6 {I don't see the need to take on e5 if Black isn't ready to capture twice.} (19... a4 20. exf6 Nxf6 21. Nxf6+ Rxf6 $13) 20. fxe5 Ba6 21. Bxc6 Qxc6 22. Bh6 Rc8 (22... Nc5 23. Bxg7 Ne4 {is a computer suggestion that is not for us flesh golems.}) 23. Rc1 g6 {The computer here insists on Nc5, saying it is the only good move.} (23... Nc5 24. Bxg7 Ne4 25. Qg4 Nf2 26. Qh4 (26. Qg5 Rf5 27. Qe7 Rf7 $11) 26... Nxh1 27. Bf6 Kf8 $1 28. Qg5 { and apparently Black somehow survives this onslaught by cooly retreating the knight to f2...}) 24. Nf4 $1 {Now White's attack succeeds.} Kh8 25. h4 Nc5 26. h5 Ne4 27. Qh4 gxh5 28. Qxh5 Qe8 29. Rh4 (29. Bg5 $1) 29... Rb7 30. Qg4 Qg8 31. Qh3 Qf7 $6 (31... b3 32. axb3 a4 {had to be tried, even if it doesn't work.}) 32. Nxe6 Rg8 33. Nd4 Qf2 34. Rg4 Re8 35. Be3 Qf7 36. e6 Qf6 37. Nf3 1-0

Eljanov outplayed Ipatov convincingly and finished with a nice tactic:

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku AZE"] [Date "2015.09.14"] [Round "2.9"] [White "Eljanov, Pavel"] [Black "Ipatov, Alexander"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E60"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "6k1/5p1p/p5p1/2n1P3/1p5P/6P1/PP1r1PB1/2R3K1 b - - 0 29"] [PlyCount "16"] [EventDate "2015.09.11"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] 29... Nd3 {White's a pawn uo but Black is rather active and comes up with a clever resource.} 30. Rc8+ Kg7 31. Rd8 $1 Rd1+ {Otherwise Black is just stuck} 32. Bf1 Nxf2 $6 (32... Nxb2 33. Rxd1 Nxd1 34. Bxa6 {It is hard to believe that Black will survive with a pawn down and bishop vs. knight, but this was the only chance.}) 33. Rd6 $1 {A beautiful idea. Black cannot move his knight because he loses the rook, and can't move the rook because it loses the knight, and can't trade because he can't stop the pawn!} Nh3+ 34. Kg2 Ra1 35. Bc4 {now the knight is just stuck on h3.} Rc1 36. b3 Ng1 37. Rf6 1-0

After a big scare in round one, Dominguez convincingly outplayed Melkumyan in a Berlin.

The "combination of the tournament" so far belongs to Ding Liren:

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku AZE"] [Date "2015.09.14"] [Round "2.8"] [White "Ding, Liren"] [Black "Inarkiev, Ernesto"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D35"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "2nr1r1k/1p3qnp/p1p2p2/6p1/PP1PPN2/1B1R3Q/6PP/5RK1 b - - 0 27"] [PlyCount "24"] [EventDate "2015.09.11"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] 27... Qe8 {Obviously, White has the initiative, but now his knight is attacked, and if he moves it to e6 the knight will get traded and White will lose some of his advantage.} 28. Qh6 $1 {No fear!} Qxe4 (28... gxf4 29. Rh3 Qxe4 {leads to lines considered below}) 29. Rh3 Ne7 (29... gxf4 30. Rxf4 $1 Qb1+ 31. Rf1 Qe4 32. Rh4 Qd3 33. Bc4 {The queen gets kicked around - h7 must remain defended.} Qc2 34. Ba2 $1 {And there is no good defense against Bb1. Best is:} Rxd4 35. Bb1 $1 Rxh4 36. Qxh4 Nf5 37. Qh3 $1 $18 {and after White takes on f5 there will be a fork on c8 and h7.}) 30. Bc2 $1 {Most precise!} Qxc2 31. Nd3 {Beautiful block. h7 cannot be defended.} Kg8 32. Qxh7+ Kf7 33. Ne5+ Ke6 34. Qxc2 {The queen is lost and with it the game. Inarkiev keeps fluttering around for only a few more moves.} fxe5 35. Rh6+ Kd7 36. Rxf8 Rxf8 37. dxe5 Ne6 38. Rf6 Re8 39. Qh7 1-0

Another surprise was Onischuk's win against Karjakin. The Russian player underestimated the power of the two bishops and the American came through with excellent technique. In similar style Laznicka won against Adams by outplaying him in a Ragozin, winning the game from start to finish. Wojtaszek won a pawn early against Artemiev and converted it.

Adams fell to Laznicka's Ragozin pressure

The game between Guseinov and Navara saw a very unusual material imbalance: queen and three pawns against rook and two pieces. The Azeri had the queen, the pawns and his king was safe - and this ultimately cost the Czech player the game.

The hero of the tiebreakers, Henriquez Villagra, was soundly ground down by Granda with the pair of bishops.

No one knows how he does it, but Granda is extremely strong when he feels like it

Mareco and Kovalyov play for Argentina and Canada, respectively, but few know they were teammates in a previous Olympiad! The Ukrainian-born player (Kovalyov) lived in Argentina for some time. Their duel today ended in a draw.

So's patience paid off

Today, the black side of the anti-Berlin worked well for the Americans: Caruana (against Mamedov) and So (against Balogh) both won with this line. Andreikin and Ivanchuk also won with black and thus put Korobov and Rodshtein in a very unenviable situation: tomorrow they both have to win with Black.

Hou Yifan and Mamedyarov split the point in a complicated Berlin. The last game of the day was a heartbreaker for Cuba's #2:

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku AZE"] [Date "2015.09.14"] [Round "2.6"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Bruzon Batista, Lazaro"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A14"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "8/1k6/4K3/1r6/3B4/8/8/2R5 w - - 0 112"] [PlyCount "11"] [EventDate "2015.09.11"] [SourceDate "2015.02.07"] 112. Kd6 Ka6 113. Bc5 {Black has been holding on to dear life for a while now. He is only 12 moves away from a draw because of the 50-move rule!} Kb7 {Losing, according to the tablebases...} (113... Ra5 $1) (113... Rb3 $1) 114. Ra1 Rb3 115. Ra7+ Kb8 $4 { Black's position is lost but this loses the game because White now mates before the 50-moves rule applies.} ( 115... Kc8 116. Kc6 Rb2 117. Rf7 Rd2 118. Rg7 Rd1 119. Ra7 Rb1 120. Ba3 $1 Rb3 121. Bd6 $1 Rc3+ 122. Bc5 Rb3 123. Rc7+ $1 Kb8 124. Re7 $1 Ka8 125. Re4 Rb1 126. Ra4+ Kb8 127. Bd6+ {with mate would have violated the 50-move rule! (125 was the limit).}) 116. Kc6 Rh3 117. Ra1 {Black can't stop Bd6+ and mate. If Rc3 then simply Rf1 with mate next.} 1-0

75+50 = 125. Not quite there yet!

All Round 2.1 Games

Round Two Pairings

Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
V. Topalov (BUL) 2816
½
 
           
Sergei Zhigalko (BLR) 2657
½
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Shanglei Lu (CHN) 2599
1
-
           
Hao Wang (CHN) 2712
0
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Peter Svilder (RUS) 2727
½
-
 
           
LiviuDieter Nisipeanu (GER) 2678
½
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Teimour Radjabov (AZE) 2738
½
           
Ilia Smirin (ISR) 2655
½
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ding Liren (CHN) 2782
1
-
 
           
Ernesto Inarkiev (RUS) 2660
0
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
David Navara (CZE) 2728
0
-
           
Gadir Guseinov (AZE) 2634
1
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Levon Aronian (ARM) 2765
½
           
Alexander Areschenko (UKR) 2661
½
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Wei Yi (CHN) 2734
1
-
 
           
Yuri Vovk (UKR) 2628
0
-
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Anish Giri (NED) 2793
½
-
 
           
Alexander Motylev (RUS) 2649
½
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Peter Leko (HUN) 2707
½
           
Wen Yang (CHN) 2620
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Cristobal Henriquez Villagra (CHI) 2511
0
 
           
Julio Granda Zuniga (PER) 2667
1
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL) 2741
1
-
 
           
Vladislav Artemiev (RUS) 2675
0
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Wesley So (USA) 2773
1
           
Csaba Balogh (HUN) 2657
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Nikita Vitiugov (RUS) 2725
½
-
 
           
Le Quang Liem (VIE) 2697
½
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Evgeny Tomashevsky (RUS) 2758
½
-
 
           
Ngoc Truong Son Nguyen (VIE) 2634
½
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Maxime VachierLagrave (FRA) 2744
½
           
Gabriel Sargissian (ARM) 2679
½
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Hikaru Nakamura (USA) 2814
½
-
 
           
Samuel Shankland (USA) 2656
½
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Laurent Fressinet (FRA) 2702
½
           
Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS) 2705
½
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Michael Adams (ENG) 2742
0
           
Viktor Laznicka (CZE) 2676
1
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Leiner Dominguez Perez (CUB) 2732
1
-
 
           
Hrant Melkumyan (ARM) 2622
0
-
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Alexander Grischuk (RUS) 2771
½
           
Vladimir Fedoseev (RUS) 2674
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Pavel Eljanov (UKR) 2717
1
-
 
           
Alexander Ipatov (TUR) 2625
0
-
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Dmitry Jakovenko (RUS) 2491
½
-
 
           
Amin Bassem (EGY) 2636
½
-
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR) 2726
1
           
Maxim Rodshtein (ISR) 2673
0
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Fabiano Caruana (USA) 2808
1
           
Rauf Mamedov (AZE) 2657
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Sandro Mareco (ARG) 2599
½
-
           
Anton Kovalyov (CAN) 2616
½
-
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
P. Harikrishna 2737
½
-
 
           
S.P. Sethuraman (IND) 2640
½
-
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) 2736
½
           
Hou Yifan (CHN) 2632
½
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Vladimir Kramnik (RUS) 2777
1
-
 
           
Lazaro Batista Bruzon (CUB) 2659
0
-
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Dmitry Andreikin (RUS) 2720
1
           
Anton Korobov (UKR) 2700
0
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Sergey Karjakin (RUS) 2762
0
           
Alexander Onischuk (USA) 2662
1
 
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Yu Yangyi (CHN) 2721
½
-
 
           
Igor Lysyj (RUS) 2671
½
-
           

Round One

Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
V. Topalov (BUL) 2816
1
1
             
2.0
O. Adu (NGR) 2241
0
0
             
0.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ivan Bukavshin (RUS) 2656
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Sergei Zhigalko (BLR) 2657
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Lu Shanglei (CHN) 2599
1
0
1
½
         
2.5
Alexander Moiseenko (UKR) 2692
0
1
0
½
         
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Wang Hao (CHN) 2712
1
0
½
1
         
2.5
Milos Perunovic (SRB) 2614
0
1
½
0
         
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Can Emre (TUR) 2531
0
½
             
0.5
Peter Svidler (RUS) 2727
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu (GER) 2678
1
½
             
1.5
David Anton Guijarro (ESP) 2628
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Teimour Radjabov (AZE) 2738
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Samuel Sevian (USA) 2556
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Romain Edouard (FRA) 2630
0
½
             
0.5
Ilia Smirin (ISR) 2655
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Tomas Krnan (CAN) 2440
0
½
             
0.5
Ding Liren (CHN) 2782
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ernesto Inarkiev (RUS) 2660
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Yuniesky Quesada Perez (CUB) 2643
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
David Navara (CZE) 2728
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Tamir Nabaty (ISR) 2597
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Gadir Guseinov (AZE) 2634
1
0
1
1
         
3.0
Maxim Matlakov (RUS) 2689
0
1
0
0
         
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Levon Aronian (ARM) 2765
1
1
             
2
Michael Wiedenkeller (LUX) 2453
0
0
             
0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Denis Khismatullin (RUS) 2651
0
½
             
0.5
Alexander Areschenko (UKR) 2661
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Salem A.R. Saleh (UAE) 2610
0
½
             
0.5
Wei Yi (CHN) 2734
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ray Robson (USA) 2680
0
½
             
0.5
Yuri Vovk (UKR) 2628
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Arthur Ssegwanyi (UGA) 2357
½
0
             
0.5
Anish Giri (NED) 2793
½
1
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Alexander Motylev (RUS) 2649
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
1
 
4.5
Boris Grachev (RUS) 2649
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
0
 
3.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Peter Leko (HUN) 2707
1
½
             
1.5
Aleksey Goganov (RUS) 2603
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Wen Yang (CHN) 2620
1
½
             
0.5
Igor Kovalenko (LAT) 2699
0
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Boris Gelfand (ISR) 2741
½
½
½
0
         
1.5
C. Henrique Villagra (CHI) 2511
½
½
½
1
         
2.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Alexandr Fier (BRA) 2624
½
0
             
0.5
Julio Granda (PER) 2667
½
1
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Babuk M.R. Lalith (IND) 2557
½
0
             
0.5
Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL) 2741
½
1
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Vladislav Artemiev (RUS) 2675
1
½
             
1.5
Surya Shekhar Ganguly (IND) 2652
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Wesley So (USA) 2773
1
1
             
2.0
Parham Maghsoodloo (IRI) 2447
0
0
             
0.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Balogh Csaba (HUN) 2657
½
½
½
½
1
½
     
3.5
Eltaj Safarli (AZE) 2659
½
½
½
½
0
½
     
2.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Samvel Ter-Sahakyan (ARM) 2601
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Nikita Vitiugov (RUS) 2725
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Le Quang Liem (VIE) 2697
½
1
             
1.5
Vasif Durarbayli (AZE) 2618
½
0
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ziaur Rahman (BAN) 2500
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Evgeny Tomashevsky (RUS) 2758
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ngoc Truong Son Nguyen (VIE) 2634
1
½
             
1.5
Robert Kempinski (POL) 2637
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (FRA) 2744
1
½
             
1.5
Isan Reynaldo Ortiz Suarez (CUB) 2577
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Mateusz Bartel (POL) 2623
½
½
½
½
0
1
½
½
½
4.5
Gabriel Sargissisan (ARM) 2679
½
½
½
½
1
0
½
½
½
4.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Richmond Phiri (ZAM) 2252
0
0
             
0.0
Hikaru Nakamura (USA) 2814
1
1
             
2.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Samuel Shankland (USA) 2656
1
½
             
1.5
Ivan Popov (RUS) 2661
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Laurent Fresinet (FRA) 2702
½
½
1
0
         
3.0
Ante Brkic (CRO) 2597
½
½
0
1
         
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Zhao Jun (CHN) 2621
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS) 2705
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Michael Adams (ENG) 2742
½
1
             
1.5
Mariya Muzychuk (UKR) 2528
½
0
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Varuzhan Akobian (USA) 2635
½
0
             
0.5
Viktor Laznicka (CZE) 2676
½
1
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Federico Perez Ponsa (ARG) 2563
1
0
½
0
         
1.5
Lenier Dominguez Perez (CUB) 2732
0
1
½
1
         
2.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Gata Kamsky (USA) 2691
0
½
             
0.5
Hrant Melkumyan (ARM) 2622
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Alexander Grischuk (RUS) 2771
½
½
½
½
½
½
1
1
 
5.0
Yusup Atabayev (TKM) 2448
½
½
½
½
½
½
0
0
 
3.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Vladimir Fedoseev (RUS) 2674
½
½
1
½
         
2.5
B. Adhiban (IND) 2659
½
½
0
½
         
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Rinat Jumabayev (KAZ) 2606
0
0
             
0.0
Pavel Eljanov (UKR) 2717
1
1
             
2.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ivan Cheparinov (BUL) 2681
½
0
             
0.5
Alexander Ipatov (TUR) 2625
½
1
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ilia Iljiushenok (RUS) 2491
½
½
0
1
½
½
0
0
 
3.0
Alexander Ipatov (RUS) 2749
½
½
1
0
½
½
1
1
 
5.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Ivan Saric (CRO) 2678
0
0
             
0.0
Amin Bassem (EGY) 2636
1
1
             
2.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR) 2726
1
½
             
1.5
Ahmed Adly (EGY) 2596
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Eduardo Iturrizaga Bonelli (VEN)  
½
0
             
0.5
Maxim Rodshtein  
½
1
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Fabiano Caruana (USA) 2808
1
1
             
2.0
Amir Zaibi (TUN) 2303
0
0
              0.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Rauf Mamedov (AZE) 2657
1
½
             
1.5
Evgeniy Najer (RUS) 2658
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Sandro Mareco (ARG) 2599
1
½
             
1.5
Hua Ni (CHN) 2704
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Rustam Kasimdzhanov (UZB) 2704
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
0
 
3.5
Anton Kovalyov (CAN) 2616
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
1
 
4.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Max Illingworth (AUS) 2517
0
½
             
0.5
P. Harikrishna (IND) 2737
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Sanan Sjugirov (RUS) 2664
0
0
             
0
S.P. Sethuraman (IND) 2640
1
1
             
2
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) 2736
1
½
             
1.5
Pouya Idani (IRI) 2569
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Rafael Leitao (BRA) 2671
½
½
0
½
          1.5
Hou Yifan (CHN) 2632
½
½
1
½
         
2.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Deysi Cori T. (PER) 2419
0
0
             
0.0
Vladimir Kramnik (RUS) 2777
1
1
             
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Lazaro Bruzon (CUB) 2659
½
½
1
1
         
3.0
Santosh Gujrathi Vidit (IND) 2651
½
½
0
0
         
1.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Dmitry Andreikin (RUS) 2720
1
½
             
1.5
Jianchao Zhou (CHN) 2606
0
½
             
0.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Dragan Solak (TUR) 2631
0
½
             
0.5
Anton Korobov (UKR) 2700
1
½
             
1.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Sergey Karjakin (RUS) 2762
1
1
             
2.0
Ermes Espinosa Veloz (CUB) 2495
0
0
             
0.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Andrei Volokitin (UKR) 2639
½
½
0
½
         
1.5
Alexander Onischuk (USA) 2662
½
½
1
½
         
2.5
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Viorel Iordachescu (MDA) 2583
0
0
             
0.0
Yu Yangyi (CHN) 2721
1
1
             
2.0
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
Pts
Igor Lysyj (RUS) 2671
½
½
½
½
1
1
     
4.0
Constantin Lupulescu (ROU) 2626
½
½
½
½
0
0
     
2.0

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Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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BKnight2003 BKnight2003 9/15/2015 08:29
In his article "Eight interesting match-ups from round two", Sagar Shah wrote that Laurent Fressinet was "too weak, too slow" to beat Ian Nepomniachtchi in rapid or blitz, and idiotic @gmwdim didn't say a word against it.

I surely agree with @Karbuncle: many people read Ramirez' articles only to criticize him over any stupid pseudo-question.

"No one knows how he does it" was obviously a joke, or even a compliment. (Sagar Shah was joking too, by the way!)
Truffaut Truffaut 9/15/2015 06:26
Wow, I didn't know that Lawrence Trent is Fabiano Caruana's manager. I really like Laurence Trent's commentary during tournaments. He doesn't take himself (or chess!) too seriously. It's nice to see people like Laurence Trent and Daniel King making a living in chess.

pathikd pathikd 9/15/2015 12:54
Of course, "the infamous Lawrence Trent : What is this, the Grand Chess Tour?" is an internal or actually not much of an internal joke now. The author is indicating Trent's loss to Carlsen in a Blitz game where Carlsen played with a rook odd, and this was during the Grand Chess Tour.
Catastrophe Catastrophe 9/15/2015 11:47
Typo: Alexander Ipatov (RUS) is supposed to be Jakovenko
Karbuncle Karbuncle 9/15/2015 11:23
To those wondering about some of the bizarre complaints here in the discussion, there's a strong anti-Ramirez faction here that looks for ANYTHING to nit-pick and take offense at. Literally that's all they look for when reading his articles.
Kusy Kusy 9/15/2015 08:03
"No one knows how he does it" He deserve those title in the game against Vovk, Y. (Elo. 2632) - Andorra Open 2015. Anyway I like your ideas in your each battle. Good luck Mr. Granda.
yesenadam yesenadam 9/15/2015 07:55
re 'infamous' - it's (obviously just) a joke, people. :-) It made me smile, as I guess it would Lawrence also.
yesenadam yesenadam 9/15/2015 07:51
gmwdim: In my opinion, the people you are arguing against are making as much if not more sense than you. Being touchy about others showing disrespect, then saying "Maybe you need to learn some English" just makes you sound autistic. (I don't mean to insult the autistic!)
You and Aighearach seem to think that 'when he feels like it' literally means exactly that. That usually or often, he just 'doesn't feel like it'. I strongly doubt that. If I said, 'Ivanchuk can play at a 2900 level, when he feels like it', it I think would mean, similarly, just that he usually or often doesn't play at that level; nothing whatsoever to do with his wanting to or not. It's an expression.
Why you feel such an authority that lecturing others on English usage in this insulting way (or rather, just plainly insulting them) is justified, especially given that your original comment was to allege disrespect, is puzzling.
oputu oputu 9/15/2015 06:24
what Ramirez said is a normal as Kramnik playing on till opponent blunders. On a normal day, he would offer a draw to Peter Leko in that position!
Logos Logos 9/15/2015 04:41
Nice report thank you. The knockout format is exciting. Nerves play a role and favourites are sometimes eliminated making the whole affair unpredictable. I am happy that Ivanchuk is doing well. His last win was a pleasure to review.

@ gmwdim

In my view Ramirez's comment was not disrespectful. I perceived it as a compliment.
Gregory Peck Gregory Peck 9/15/2015 01:23
Liren Ding's combination reminds me of the Adams-Torre game
maac2002 maac2002 9/15/2015 01:17
In fact i ask why the term "infamous" to L. Trent, it sounds to me offensive, otherwise is this a internal joke between both (Ramírez & Trent) ?
VegnoDeSotignon VegnoDeSotignon 9/15/2015 12:42
Also defining IM Trent "infamous" sounds a bit offensive: maybe you meant "famous"?
Aighearach Aighearach 9/14/2015 11:36
Perhaps it is different in other languages, but in English it is generally considered rude to say (or even imply) that somebody "doesn't feel like" doing better than they do. There is not really any question of if such a thing will be considered rude by many people; it will be. Even if you support this type of statement about Granda's personal character, and agree that he is just intellectually lazy, you would still expect many people to take offense.

My own opinion is that I doubt that Granda is some sort of Superman who gets to nearly 2700 while being lazy and unmotivated. The claim is highly suspicious, but clearly offensive.

Also, everybody higher rated than you is extremely strong. All the time.
gmwdim gmwdim 9/14/2015 11:13
@TMMM: Maybe you need to learn some English. Whatever follows the phrase "No one knows how he does it" is implied to be something that is unexpected or unusual, which is why nobody knows. In your example of Carlsen winning from an equal position, the thing that "no one knows" is "how he does it (winning from an equal position)" because it follows "no one knows" in the sentence. This is reasonable because winning from an equal position is indeed unexpected and unusual. In the case of what Ramirez wrote, the thing that "no one knows" is "Granda is extremely strong" because that's what follows it in the sentence. That means that Ramirez is saying that "Granda is extremely strong" is unexpected or unusual, which is what is disrespectful because it's perfectly normal for a highly rated GM to be a strong player. The last part with "when he feels like it" makes it worse, as if there's some reason why Granda shouldn't "feel like" being a strong player.
TMMM TMMM 9/14/2015 09:57
@gmwdim: If Carlsen starts an endgame with an equal position and manages to win it (again), one could also write something like "No one knows how he does it but he did it again". That's not suggesting in any way that Carlsen is not a strong player. If you do interpret this as an insult to Granda, then that's because you choose to read it this way.
ChiliBean ChiliBean 9/14/2015 08:57
Good day for the Americans! :D
ChiliBean ChiliBean 9/14/2015 08:49
That game with Kramnik shows chess can be complicated for a GM even with very few pieces. Wow!
gmwdim gmwdim 9/14/2015 08:25
"No one knows how he does it" - Granda is a strong GM, of course he's extremely strong. This statement implies that somehow he shouldn't be a strong player.
"when he feels like it" - implying that Granda sometimes doesn't "feel like" playing strongly, with no evidence to suggest that to be the case.
hserusk hserusk 9/14/2015 08:21
Wow, folks here can read minds! ("...certainly it's not what Ramirez intended to say")
Paint me impressed.
TMMM TMMM 9/14/2015 08:17
@gmwdim: Why is it direspectful? He's saying Granda can play extremely well in important situations like these at the World Cup. It sounds more like a compliment to me. (Are you perhaps interpreting it as that Ramirez is questioning whether Granda is cheating or something? I think it's a stretch to read so much into it, and certainly it's not what Ramirez intended to say.)
anonimous anonimous 9/14/2015 08:12
I don't see why what Ramirez said is disrespectful. He remarked that Granda plays much better than his rating, easily like a 2700+, at times - remember his last World Cup?
gmwdim gmwdim 9/14/2015 07:58
"No one knows how he does it, but Granda is extremely strong when he feels like it"

What a disrespectful thing to say. Granda is a 2667 rated GM, far higher than Ramirez has ever been.
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