Baku 1.1: Upsets here and there

by Alejandro Ramirez
9/11/2015 – Things went mostly as predicted in Baku, as the majority of the top seeds cruised through their games while the middle seeds had many draws as they played players of similar calibre. Some of the major upsets were certainly by two Argentinians: Perez Ponsa beating Dominguez and Sandro Mareco over Ni Hua. Several top GMs were also held to a draw, including Giri, Gelfand, Grischuk and Adams.

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World Cup

10th September – 5th October

Baku, Azerbaijan

Round One

The tournament started followed the normal patterns of a KO: The top seeds cruised through their first round, while most of the tough matches came in the middle, where players of similar rating faced each other. That being said, we did have 64 games of action packed chess!

The opening move

A few games finished within a couple of hours of play. Caruana annihilated his opponent, and Topalov had no problems with Adu, just as Nakamura won easily with black.

No problems for Hikaru!

Kramnik was also able to crush Deysi Cori, and he did so with some nice tactics:

Kramnik showed a little flair

[Event "FIDE World Chess Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2015.09.11"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Cori T, Deysi"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2419"] [BlackElo "2777"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "2r1k2r/1b2qp2/p2b2pp/1pnp4/6P1/2N1PN2/PPQ2P1P/1K1RB1R1 b k - 0 17"] [PlyCount "29"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] {Cori (Desiy, not Jorge!) was feeling rather ambitious, but her g4 advances were not fast enough and Black has a clear initiative. Black could simply play 17...0-0 and enjoy a big advantage, but Kramnik already smells blood.} 17... d4 $1 18. exd4 (18. Nxd4 b4 {drops the knight on c3, because if it moves...} 19. Nce2 Be4 {the queen is lost!}) 18... Bxf3 19. dxc5 Bxd1 20. Qxd1 Rxc5 {White has some minor compensation for the exchange, mainly she can play 21.f3 and Ne4, trying to establish some counterplay. However she tries to counteract immediately.} 21. Qf3 O-O 22. Ne4 Rc4 23. Nf6+ Kg7 24. Bd2 Be5 25. g5 hxg5 26. Nh5+ Kg8 (26... gxh5 27. Bxg5 {only leads to a draw, but Black doesn't have to take the knight, of course.}) 27. Bxg5 Qb4 28. Nf6+ Bxf6 29. Qxf6 {White is threatening 30.Bh6 with mate, but Black has enough time to stop this.} Rg4 $1 30. Rd1 {Allowing a pretty finish} (30. Rxg4 Qxg4 {threatens mate on d1.}) 30... Qe4+ 31. Ka1 Qd5 $1 {The queen is taboo due to the back rank mate, and this costs White her bishop on g5.} 0-1

So was playing a talented kid, but in time trouble it seems that Maghsoodloo missed a golden opportunity:

[Event "FIDE World Chess Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2015.09.11"] [Round "1.1"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Maghsoodloo, Parham"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A30"] [WhiteElo "2773"] [BlackElo "2447"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "6k1/2q4p/2p2QpP/2Nb1p2/8/5P2/r5P1/4R1K1 b - - 0 38"] [PlyCount "10"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] 38... Ra8 {A crucial position. So has built up his position, and now is the time to strike.} 39. Nd7 $2 {I believe this move should end in a draw, but it is still tough to calculate.} (39. Re7 Ra1+ 40. Kf2 Ra2+ 41. Ke3 Ra3+ 42. Nd3 $1 {otherwise it is unclear} Qb6+ 43. Kf4 {Black has no good queen checks on the fourth rank} Ra4+ (43... Qb8+ 44. Ne5 Rxf3+ 45. gxf3 Qb4+ 46. Nc4 $1 {only move} Qxc4+ 47. Kg3 f4+ 48. Kh4 {and White wins}) 44. Kg3 $18) 39... Qxd7 40. Re7 Qxe7 $4 {So's young opponent is unable to find the correct resource} (40... Qa7+ 41. Rxa7 (41. Kh2 Qa1 $1 42. Re8+ Rxe8 {is similar.}) 41... Rxa7 42. Qe5 Rf7 {And even though I'm not 100% sure about this, I simply don't see how White breaks through Black's defenses:} 43. Kf2 Kf8 44. Kg3 Kg8 45. Kf4 Kf8 46. Kg5 {perhaps the king can go around through the queenside? But then what? It seems unlikely to me.}) 41. Qxe7 Bf7 42. Qf6 Kf8 43. Qh8+ 1-0

Denis Khismatullin talking with Anton Korobov. The Russian (Denis) lost while the Ukrainian won his game.

Today was a surprisingly good day for Argentina! Both of their representatives won against higher rated players. First Perez Ponsa was the biggest upset of the day by beating Dominguez:

The highest rated Latin American lost to another Latin American...

[Event "FIDE World Chess Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2015.09.11"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Perez Ponsa, Federico"] [Black "Dominguez Perez, Leinier"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B94"] [WhiteElo "2563"] [BlackElo "2732"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "4k3/2q1pp2/p2p3r/1prbn3/3N3P/8/PPP2QP1/1K1R1BR1 w - - 0 20"] [PlyCount "43"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] 20. g4 {A very weird position. Black's kingside has been annihilated, White hasn't developed his f1 bishop but has a passed pawn on h4... Black needs to create somethig on the queenside, but it seems as if everything falls short.} Qa5 21. Nb3 $1 Bxb3 22. axb3 Rf6 23. Qg2 $1 {The best placement of the queen. It can now eye the a8 square and give potentially annoying checks.} d5 24. Bd3 Nc6 $6 {It's hard to recommend something, and trading on d3 is undesirable, but this almost loses on the spot.} 25. c3 (25. g5 $1 Rd6 26. Qf2 d4 27. c3 $1 {is a beautiful trick, following up with b4.}) 25... b4 26. g5 $1 Rd6 27. c4 $1 {White's position advantage is very clear. His king is surprisingly safe on b1, while Black will have to deal with his own problems for his majesty and deal with the passed pawns on the kingside.} dxc4 28. Bxc4 Ne5 (28... Rxc4 29. bxc4 Nd4 {was more challenging. Black is threatening b3 with some ideas of counterplay and White would have had to find} 30. Rxd4 $1 Rxd4 31. Qa8+ Qd8 32. Qxd8+ Rxd8 33. h5 $16 {with what should be a winning endgame.}) 29. Rxd6 exd6 { The attack simply plays itself out for White now} 30. Qa8+ (30. Qe4 $1) 30... Qd8 31. Qe4 Qe7 32. Re1 Kd8 33. Qa8+ Rc8 34. Qxa6 Qd7 35. Qb6+ Ke7 36. Qf2 Kd8 37. Qb6+ Rc7 38. Bb5 $1 Qf5+ 39. Ka2 Kc8 40. Qxd6 {White is up two pawns and has a crushing attack.} Nc6 41. Ba6+ 1-0

Shortly afterwards Sandro Mareco was able to capitalize in a mistake by Ni Hua:

[Event "FIDE World Chess Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2015.09.11"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Mareco, Sandro"] [Black "Ni, Hua"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A09"] [WhiteElo "2599"] [BlackElo "2704"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "7r/1p1kn1pp/1Pp1bp2/p1R5/3r4/P1N2B2/5PPP/4R1K1 w - - 0 25"] [PlyCount "16"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] 25. Rxa5 {Black's position isn't a lot of fun. He has some problems with his king which are not trivial to solve, but he should still be able to hang on} Bd5 $2 {Ni Hua must have forgotten about a small detail!} (25... Bf5 $1) (25... Rb8 $1 26. Ne4 Bf5 27. Nc5+ Kd6 {and I don't see any immediate problems with Black's position.}) 26. Na4 $1 Rc4 (26... Rb8 27. Nc5+ Kd6 28. Bxd5 {doesn't work anymore, as Black simply gets mated on e6 if he retakes the bishop!}) ( 26... Rxa4 27. Rxa4 Bxf3 28. gxf3 Nd5 {was best case scenario, but still heavily favoring White.}) (26... Bxf3 27. Nc5+ Kd6 28. Nxb7+ Kd7 29. Nc5+ Kd6 30. gxf3 $18) 27. Be2 $1 Rxa4 28. Rxa4 Kd6 29. Bd3 c5 30. Be4 Rc8 31. Rd1 Kc6 32. Bxd5+ Nxd5 {The win is still far from trivial, but Mareco's technique was fabulous and he converted his extra exchange in a long endgame.} 1-0

The organizers also have reasons to be happy: all of the Azeri players won except for Safarli and Radjabov, who were held to a draw. Overall, very good!

Robson was on the wrong side of a beautiful game

The game of the day was, in my opinion, Vovk's excellent victory over Robson:

[Event "FIDE World Chess Cup 2015"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2015.09.11"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Robson, Ray"] [Black "Vovk, Yuri"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C11"] [WhiteElo "2680"] [BlackElo "2628"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Be3 cxd4 8. Nxd4 Bc5 9. Qd2 O-O 10. O-O-O a6 11. Nb3 Bb4 12. Bd3 b5 13. Nd4 {Very rare. Almost everyone playis 13.g4, and it scores very well. Surely Vovk knew what he was doing as he was playing very quickly until 13.Nd4 appeared on the board.} (13. g4 Na5 14. Bd4 Nc4 $13 {Gharamian-Ni Hua 2011, for example.}) 13... Bb7 { Natural. The position is a very clear sharp French. Black's attack on the queenside looks menacing, but you can never underestimate how fast White can achieve things on the kingside.} 14. Nxc6 Bxc6 15. Bd4 Nc5 16. Qf2 Nxd3+ 17. Rxd3 Be7 18. Nd1 b4 19. Rh3 Rc8 20. Ne3 f5 {A classic idea. Winning some space on the kingside allows Black more defensive resources on that side. However, it does allow White a break on that side of the board.} 21. g4 $6 (21. exf6 Bxf6 $17 {is not playable when White is so committed to the kingside.}) (21. Rg1 {preparing g4 was better.}) 21... fxg4 22. Nxg4 Be8 $1 {Suddenly the bad French bishop is jumping to g6 with devastating effect!} 23. Nf6+ Bxf6 24. exf6 Bg6 $1 25. fxg7 Rf7 {The pawn on g7 does not harm White. He now has very difficult problems to solve on the kingside.} 26. Be5 (26. c3 Qa5 $1 $19 {for example:} 27. Rg1 Qxa2 {leads to beautiful continuations, but honestly I doubt this was Vovk's idea.} (27... Bf5 {is more human and probably what Vovk had in mind. White cannot prevent Qxa2.}) 28. Rxg6 Qa1+ 29. Kc2 (29. Kd2 Qxb2+ 30. Ke3 Rxc3+ $1 31. Bxc3 Qxc3+ 32. Ke2 Qb2+ 33. Ke1 Qxf2+ 34. Kxf2 hxg6 {winning.}) 29... b3+ $1 30. Kd3 Qd1+ $1 31. Qd2 (31. Ke3 e5 $3 32. Bxe5 Rc4 {with a decisive attack.}) 31... Qf1+ 32. Qe2 Qxh3+ $19) 26... Qg5 $3 {Brilliant. The queen attacks e5 and reinforces all the threats on the queenside by placing itself on f5 when the time is right.} 27. Re3 Bxc2 $1 28. Kd2 Bg6 29. Rc1 Rxc1 30. Kxc1 Qf5 {in opposite colored bishop situations, the most important thing is king safety. It is obvious that White is the one suffering here.} 31. Qe2 d4 $1 32. Rb3 (32. Bxd4 Qb1+ 33. Kd2 Rc7 $19) (32. Rg3 {was the best try, but already White is losing.} Qb1+ 33. Kd2 Qxb2+) 32... Qb1+ 33. Kd2 Qc2+ 34. Ke1 d3 $1 35. Qd1 Rd7 36. Rxb4 d2+ 37. Ke2 Qxd1+ {A fantastic game.} 0-1

More than a few top GMs were held to a draw. Gelfand, Grischuk, Giri (who was winning, messed it up and then tried for more than 150 moves and six hours of play) and Adams all failed to win their game today, and will have to win tomorrow or go into a tiebreak. The faster the time control, the more unpredictable the result!

Women's World Champion Mariya Muzychuk held Adams to a draw

David Navara drew his game

Hou Yifan felt the result was good for her, as she drew Leitao with black

All Round 1.1 Games

Round One Pairings

Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
V. Topalov (BUL) 2816
1
           
O. Adu (NGR) 2241
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ivan Bukavshin (RUS) 2656
½
           
Sergei Zhigalko (BLR) 2657
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Shanglei Lu (CHN) 2599
1
           
Alexander Moiseenko (UKR) 2692
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Hao Wang (CHN) 2712
1
           
Milos Perunovic (SRB) 2614
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Can Emre (TUR) 2531
0
           
Peter Svilder (RUS) 2727
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu (GER) 2678
1
           
David Anton Guijarro (ESP) 2628
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Teimour Radjabov (AZE) 2738
½
           
Samuel Sevian (USA) 2556
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Romain Edouard (FRA) 2630
0
           
Ilia Smirin (ISR) 2655
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Tomas Krnan (CAN) 2440
0
           
Ding Liren (CHN) 2782
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ernesto Inarkiev (RUS) 2660
½
           
Yuniesky Quesada Perez (CUB) 2643
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
David Navara (CZE) 2728
½
           
Tamir Nabaty (ISR) 2597
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Gadir Guseinov (AZE) 2634
1
           
Maxim Matlakov (RUS) 2689
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Levon Aronian (ARM) 2765
1
           
Michael Wiedenkeller (LUX) 2453
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Denis Khismatullin (RUS) 2651
0
           
Alexander Areschenko (UKR) 2661
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Salem A.R. Saleh (UAE) 2610
0
           
Wei Yi (CHN) 2734
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ray Robson (USA) 2680
0
           
Yuri Vovk (UKR) 2628
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Arthur Ssegwanyi (UGA) 2357
½
           
Anish Giri (NED) 2793
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Alexander Motylev (RUS) 2649
½
           
Boris Grachev (RUS) 2649
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Peter Leko (HUN) 2707
1
           
Aleksey Goganov (RUS) 2603
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Wen Yang (CHN) 2620
1
           
Igor Kovalenko (LAT) 2699
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Boris Gelfand (ISR) 2741
½
           
Cristobal Henriquez Villagra (CHI) 2511
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Alexandr Fier (BRA) 2624
½
           
Julio Granda Zuniga (PER) 2667
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Babuk M.R. Lalith (IND) 2557
½
           
Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL) 2741
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Vladislav Artemiev (RUS) 2675
1
           
Surya Shekhar Ganguly (IND) 2652
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Wesley So (USA) 2773
1
           
Parham Maghsoodloo (IRI) 2447
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Csaba Balogh (HUN) 2657
½
           
Eltaj Safarli (AZE) 2659
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Samvel Ter-Sahakyan (ARM) 2601
½
           
Nikita Vitiugov (RUS) 2725
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Le Quang Liem (VIE) 2697
½
           
Vasif Durarbayli (AZE) 2618
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ziaur Rahman (BAN) 2500
½
           
Evgeny Tomashevsky (RUS) 2758
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ngoc Truong Son Nguyen (VIE) 2634
1
           
Robert Kempinski (POL) 2637
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (FRA) 2744
1
           
Isan Reynaldo Ortiz Suarez (CUB) 2577
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Mateusz Bartel (POL) 2623
½
           
Gabriel Sargissian (ARM) 2679
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Richmond Phiri (ZAM) 2252
0
           
Hikaru Nakamura (USA) 2814
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Samuel Shankland (USA) 2656
1
           
Ivan Popov (RUS) 2661
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Laurent Fressinet (FRA) 2702
½
           
Ante Brkic (CRO) 2597
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Zhao Jun (CHN) 2621
½
           
Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS) 2705
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Michael Adams (ENG) 2742
½
           
Mariya Muzychuk (UKR) 2528
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Varuzhan Akobian (USA) 2635
½
           
Viktor Laznicka (CZE) 2676
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Federico Perez Ponsa (ARG) 2563
1
           
Leiner Dominguez Perez (CUB) 2732
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Gata Kamsky (USA) 2691
0
           
Hrant Melkumyan (ARM) 2622
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Alexander Grischuk (RUS) 2771
½
           
Yusup Atabayev (TKM) 2448
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Vladimir Fedoseev (RUS) 2674
½
           
B. Adhiban (IND) 2659
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Rinat Jumabayev (KAZ) 2606
0
           
Pavel Eljanov (UKR) 2717
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ivan Cheparinov (BUL) 2681
½
           
Alexander Ipatov (TUR) 2625
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ilia Iljiushenok (RUS) 2749
½
           
Dmitry Jakovenko (RUS) 2491
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Ivan Saric (CRO) 2678
0
           
Amin Bassem (EGY) 2636
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR) 2726
1
           
Ahmed Adly (EGY) 2596
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Eduardo Iturrizaga Bonelli (VEN)  
½
           
Maxim Rodshtein (ISR)  
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Fabiano Caruana (USA) 2808
1
           
Amir Zaibi (TUN) 2303
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Rauf Mamedov (AZE) 2657
1
           
Evgeniy Najer (RUS) 2658
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Sandro Mareco (ARG) 2599
1
           
Hua Ni (CHN) 2704
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Rustam Kasimdzhanov (UZB) 2704
½
           
Anton Kovalyov (CAN) 2616
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Max Illingworth (AUS)) 2517
0
           
P. Harikrishna 2737
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Sanan Sjugirov (RUS) 2664
0
           
S.P. Sethuraman (IND) 2640
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) 2736
1
           
Pouya Idani (IRI) 2569
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Rafael Leitao (BRA) 2671
½
           
Hou Yifan (CHN) 2632
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Deysi Cori T. (PER) 2419
0
           
Vladimir Kramnik (RUS) 2777
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Lazaro Batista Bruzon (CUB) 2659
½
           
Santosh Gujrathi Vidit (IND) 2651
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Dmitry Andreikin (RUS) 2720
1
           
Jianchao Zhou (CHN) 2606
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Dragan Solak (TUR) 2631
0
           
Anton Korobov (UKR) 2700
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Sergey Karjakin (RUS) 2762
1
           
Ermes Espinosa Veloz (CUB) 2495
0
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Andrei Volokitin (UKR) 2639
½
           
Alexander Onischuk (USA) 2662
½
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Viorel Iordachescu (MDA) 2583
0
           
Yu Yangyi (CHN) 2721
1
           
Player Rtg
G1
G2
G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 Pts
Igor Lysyj (RUS) 2671
½
           
Constantin Lupulescu (ROU) 2626
½
           

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The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 


Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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raki-baki raki-baki 9/12/2015 01:06
vishyvishy?? The game Rosbon/Vovk is clearly the best game of this round.
vishyvishy vishyvishy 9/12/2015 07:03
Harikrishna's Game was really game of the day!
ff2017 ff2017 9/11/2015 08:30
Hoy Yifan to the second round!
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