Aryan Tari wins Norwegian Championship

by Holger Blauhut
7/16/2015 – Early July the Norwegian Championships were played in Oslo as part of the "Landsturneringen". Magnus Carlsen, Jon Ludvig Hammer, and Simen Agdestein did not try for the title, giving young talents a chance to shine. 16-year old Aryan Tari won and became the third youngest Norwegian Champion of all time. Magnus Carlsen won gold in an unusual team event.

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The Norwegian Championship was played from 4. to 11. Juli in Oslo as part of the "Landsturneringen", in which 671 chessplayers started in various groups. The "Elite Group" played for the title of Norwegian Champion. It was no big surprise that Norway's number one, World Champion Magnus Carlsen, did not play, but Jon Ludvig Hammer and Simen Agdestein, Norway's number two and three, were also missing. A good opportunity for the teenagers to take over.

Aryan Tari (right, with Black).

The 16-year old Aryan Tari won ahead of 18-year old Johan Salomon, and 17-year old Kristian Stuvik Holm. With this success Aryan Tari became the third youngest Norwegian Champion of all time. Simen Agdestein and Magnus Carlsen were 15 when winning the title. But in the final round things could have taken a different turn. In the last round Tari decided to play it safe and agreed to a quick draw with Holm, which gave Johan Salomon a big opportunity:

The new champion

With a last-round-win Salomon would have won the title and secured a GM norm.

45.Ra6! would have sealed the deal for Salomon but he failed to find this move and in the end came only second.

Final standings

Pl Navn Kl n-Elo i-Elo Klubb Poeng Med.Buchh
IM Aryan Tari Eli Vålerenga
7,0
35,5
IM Johan Salomon Eli Nordstrand
6,5
37,0
IM Kristian Stuvik Holm Eli Vålerenga
6,0
35,0
IM Frode Olav Olsen Urkedal Eli 1911
5,5
38,0
IM Frode Elsness Eli 1911
5,5
37,0
GM Berge Østenstad Eli Asker
5,5
33,0
FM Johan-Sebastian Christiansen Eli Vålerenga
5,5
32,0
GM Rune Djurhuus Eli Nordstrand
5,0
37,0
GM Einar J Gausel Eli OSS
5,0
37,0
10 
IM Nicolai Getz Eli OSS
5,0
29,0
11 
Erlend Mikalsen Eli Alta
4,5
34,0
12 
FM Ørnulf Stubberud Eli OSS
4,5
29,0
13 
FM Petter Fossan Eli Stavanger
4,0
34,0
14 
IM Øystein Hole Mes Akademisk
4,0
31,5
15 
IM Erik Fossan Eli Stavanger
4,0
29,0
16 
IM Magne Sagafos Eli Vålerenga
4,0
28,5
17 
FM Joachim B. Nilsen Eli Bergens
4,0
25,5
18 
IM Atle Grønn Eli OSS
4,0
25,0
19 
Eivind X Djurhuus Eli Nordstrand
3,5
30,5
20 
IM Andreas G.R. Moen Eli OSS
3,5
26,0
21 
Jon Kr. Røyset Eli Tromsø
3,5
24,0
22 
CM Inge Sandstad Skrondal Mes Stavanger
3,0
29,5
23 
Pål Røyset Eli Tromsø
3,0
27,5
24 
FM Bjørnar Byklum Eli SOSS
2,0
27,5

Part of the "Landsturneringen" was the Norwegian Blitz Championship. This tournament was played in four groups, in which 415 started. In the Master Group 38 players fought for the title of Norwegian Blitz Champion. The final was won by Leif Erlend Johannessen ahead of Sebastian Mihajlov, the Norwegian Junior Champion, and Simen Agdestein.

Other events were soccer tournaments, team blitz, and „Pratelagsjakk“, an idea of Hans Olav Lahlum. This is a kind of „Team Talk Tournament“, in which each team plays on six boards with a time limit of twelve minutes per game and board. However, each team only consists of two to four players. But these players can change places and are allowed to talk with each other. A junior team that was made a bit stronger by Magnus Carlsen, won the tournament.

World Champion Magnus Carlsen in acton at „Pratelagsjakk“.
You can see Hans Olav Lahlum, the inventor of this form of chess, with
a pink jacket at the left-hand corner of the picture. (Photo: Erling Tenold)

Carlsen also took part in another side-event: The time-handicap blitz for teams of three, where a total time of ten minutes is divided between the two teams based on their relative average rating. For Carlsen's team, this meant that they had to play most games with half a minute versus nine and a half, or one minute against nine, and even though Carlsen had no particular problems with this, the rest of the team did not cope so well with the time odds, and so the team finished with a modest placing.

Suddenly you play against the World Champion...

...and he plays against you.

In team tournaments good back-up can be crucial.

Photos: Bjørn Berg Johansen  

Links

Tournament page...

Results, tables...

Impressions at Sjakk.net...

Norwegian Chess Federation...

 



Author, publisher and office worker. Holger Blauhut lives in Fredrikstad in Norway.
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