2016 Baku Rd9: US and Ukraine lead, Russia third

by Albert Silver
9/12/2016 – Once more it was a great round, chock full of exciting matches and dramatic games. The US against Norway match held the spotlight, if only because of the top-board encounter between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana, though the Americans won 3-1. The Ukraine defeated India to join the lead, while Russia thumped Azerbaijan. The surprise of the day was Iran's youthful team tied with England. In the Women's event, the Chinese beat the US to take sole lead. Full report with photos, videos, and analysis by GM Fabiano Caruana!

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2016 Baku Olympiad

All games start at 3 p.m. local time = 1 p.m. in Europe (CEST), one hour earlier in Britain, and 2 p.m. in Moscow. You can find the starting time at your location here.

Watch it live on Playchess!

Round nine

If the competition were to be described as a race around a track, then the ninth round could be seen as the final curve before the sprint to the finish line. Although the highest profile encounter of the day was the United States versus Norway, it was mostly by virtue of the board one encounter between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana, both over 2800, and quite likely the only game between two 2800 players that will take place at Baku.

On paper the Americans had a significant advantage overall. The World Champion could undoubtedly score a point for his team, but that was unlikely to offset the depth of the US team’s other boards.

Once more the media and photographers gathered around the point of greatest interest, and there was little denying the attraction of the match between the two young elite players. (photo by E. Kublashvili)

Earlier this year, Fabiano Caruana had led the Candidates Tournament going into the last round and might easily have been Carlsen's challenger. Although he missed his chance this time, he did win the US Championship, arguably with the strongest field ever. (photo by Pascal Simon)

It was a rather curious choice of openings as Magnus Carlsen decided to whip out the Scandinavian Defense (1.e4 d5) with black for the second time against Caruana. He had previously done so in a classical game in Tromso 2014. Hikaru Nakamura's face shows exactly what he thinks of this choice. (photo by E. Kublashvili)

Fabiano Caruana analyzes his game with Magnus Carlsen

Although it ended in a very interesting draw, the strength of the US team made itself felt on other boards as Hikaru Nakamura and Sam Shankland both won their respective games to win the match 3-1.

The highest profile match overall, at least inasmuch as the standings were concerned, was between Ukraine and India, both of whom shared the lead with the US entering the round.

It was a tough, high quality match that was ultimately decided on the fourth board between S.P. Sethuraman and Anton Korobov. The Ukrainian nursed an endgame advantage with the utmost seriousness and was ultimately able to convert it and decide the match. With this result, Ukraine ties the US for first-second. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Alexander Grischuk started slow, but has now scored two important wins in the last two rounds (photo by David Llada)

The Russian team faced a tough challenge with the very strong Azeri team, but ended up winning it 3-1 with wins by Kramnik and Grischuk (above) over Radjabov and Naiditsch respectively. This also helped keep Russia's medal ambitions alive as they are in clear third, just behind the US and Ukraine. We bring you detailed annotations by GM Elshan Moradiabadi on Kramnik's victory.

Vladimir Kramnik - Teimour Radjabov (annotated by GM Elshan Moradiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.11"] [Round "9.14"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2808"] [BlackElo "2722"] [Annotator "Elshan Moradiabdi"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "team-tourn"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Azerbaijan"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "AZE"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] {The match between the host, Azerbaijani team, and Russia was a do-or-die one. The winner will take a big step toward the podium while the loser is left with mere chances of clinching any medal. In this 'close encounter' the Russians managed to hold their nerves better and win the match 3-1. Kramnik's quick victory in this game made a great contribution to the team's morale and the final result.} 1. e4 {(00:00)} e5 {(00:30) It will remain a mystery what Kramnik would have done against Radjabov's Sveshnikov.} 2. Nf3 {(00:00)} Nc6 {(00:02)} 3. Bc4 {(00:00) Kramnik plays the Italian against 1...e5 exclusively these days.} Bc5 {(01:45)} 4. O-O $5 { ( 00:20) Is Kramnik going for the Max Lange attack? Ahh, who is Max Lange? You can google or read Edward Winter's great article for ChessBase. Search fror Max Lange in the site's Search.} Nf6 {(00:38)} 5. d3 {(00:06) No! Kramnik declines the invitation and does not play d4 to enter the Max Lange.} d6 {(02:31)} 6. c3 {(00:13)} a6 {(00:02) The position has transposed into what is unofficially known as the 'Giuoco Pianissimo'. This is when White does not opt for an early d4 in the game.} 7. Re1 {(01:21)} (7. a4 Ba7 8. Na3 Ne7 9. Nc2 Ng6 10. Be3 O-O 11. Bxa7 Rxa7 12. Ne3 Ng4 13. Qd2 a5 14. d4 Ra8 15. dxe5 N4xe5 16. Nxe5 Nxe5 17. Bb3 Nd7 18. Bc2 Re8 19. f3 b6 20. Rfd1 Nc5 21. b4 Nd7 22. Bb3 Nf6 23. Qd4 Qe7 24. Nd5 Nxd5 25. Bxd5 Ra7 26. b5 Bb7 27. c4 Qe5 28. Rac1 Qxd4+ 29. Rxd4 Kf8 30. Kf2 Ke7 31. f4 f6 32. Rc3 Kd7 33. Rh3 h6 34. Rg3 Re7 35. Rg6 Bxd5 36. cxd5 Ra8 37. Kf3 Rae8 38. Kg4 Rxe4 39. Rxg7+ Kc8 40. Rd2 Kb8 41. Rc2 Rc8 42. Ra2 Rd4 43. Kf5 Rxd5+ 44. Kxf6 Rf8+ 45. Rf7 Rxf7+ 46. Kxf7 Rf5+ 47. Kg6 Rxf4 48. g3 Rc4 49. Kxh6 d5 50. Kh5 d4 51. g4 d3 52. h4 Rd4 53. Rd2 Kc8 54. g5 Kd7 55. Kg6 Rxh4 56. Rxd3+ Ke8 57. Ra3 Rc4 58. Kg7 Kd7 59. g6 c6 60. Kf6 cxb5 61. g7 Rg4 62. axb5 Rg1 63. Rd3+ Ke8 64. Re3+ Kd7 65. Re5 Rxg7 66. Rd5+ { 1-0 (66) Anand,V (2762)-Aronian,L (2786) Moscow 2016}) 7... Ba7 {(05:34)} 8. a4 $5 {(00:34) This move became popular thanks to Anand's two victories at the Candidates against Aronian} O-O {(01:42)} 9. h3 {(00:44)} Ne7 {(06:35)} 10. Nbd2 {(00:31)} Ng6 {(01:34)} 11. d4 $1 {( 00:25) Any other move would be a waste of time. Furthermore, White now has the choice of placing his bishop on f1 to counter Black's possible activity on the kingside.} (11. Nf1 c6 12. Bb3 d5 13. exd5 Nxd5 14. d4 exd4 15. Nxd4 Be6 16. Bc2 Qf6 17. Ng3 Bxd4 18. cxd4 Ngf4 19. Ra3 Qd8 20. Ne4 Bf5 21. Rf3 Bxe4 22. Bxe4 Ng6 23. g3 Qd7 24. h4 Rfe8 25. h5 Nf8 26. h6 g6 27. a5 Re6 28. Bc2 Rxe1+ 29. Qxe1 Re8 30. Qd1 Qg4 31. Kg2 Ne6 32. Be3 Rd8 33. Qd2 Nxe3+ 34. Qxe3 Ng5 35. Rf6 Qh3+ 36. Kg1 Qxh6 37. f4 Ne6 38. Rxe6 fxe6 39. Qxe6+ Kf8 40. Qf6+ Ke8 41. Qe6+ Kf8 42. Qf6+ Ke8 {1/2-1/2 (42) Caruana,F (2795)-So,W (2773) Saint Louis 2016}) (11. Bb3 Re8 12. d4 h6 13. Bc2 c6 14. Nf1 d5 15. Nxe5 Nxe5 16. dxe5 Nxe4 17. Bxe4 dxe4 18. Qxd8 Rxd8 19. Ng3 Bb8 20. Be3 Bxe5 21. Nxe4 Bc7 22. a5 Bf5 23. Nc5 Rab8 24. g4 Bc2 25. Rac1 Bg6 26. b4 Bd6 27. Na4 f6 28. Ba7 Ra8 29. Bc5 Be5 30. Nb6 Rab8 31. Nc4 Bf4 32. Be3 Bxe3 33. Rxe3 b5 34. axb6 Bf7 {1/2-1/2 (34) Anand,V (2770)-Aronian,L (2792) Saint Louis 2016}) 11... h6 {(04:56)} 12. Bf1 $146 {(07:09) This is a novelty in a calm position.} Re8 {(02:31)} 13. a5 {(07:48) A typical and natural reaction after an early a4. White gains some space on the queenside.} Bd7 {(10:08) } 14. b4 {(11:12)} Bc6 $6 {( 19:15) A known provocative move with the intention of opening up the a7-f2 diagonal for the bishop. However, it seems that Radjabov overestimated his play after d5 in this particular position.} ( 14... d5 $1 15. exd5 $6 (15. dxe5 Nxe4 16. Nxe4 dxe4 17. Rxe4 Bc6 18. Re1 Qxd1 19. Rxd1 Bxf3 20. gxf3 Nxe5 21. Kg2 (21. Be2 Ng4 $1) (21. Bg2 Ng6 22. f4 c6 { Diagram [#]}) 21... Ng6 22. Kg3 Ne7 23. f4 Nf5+ 24. Kf3 Nh4+ 25. Kg3 (25. Kg4 $2 Bxf2) 25... Nf5+ $11) 15... e4 16. Nh2 Nxd5 17. Qb3 (17. Nxe4 $2 Rxe4 { wins for Black}) 17... Bf5 18. Nc4 c6 {And Black will reroute his bishop via b8.}) 15. d5 {(07:09)} Bd7 {(00:22)} 16. c4 {(03:24)} Nf4 {(02:14) Black has active pieces but White has a lot of space to manouver his pieces and pushes his pawns.} 17. c5 $5 {(15:08)} g5 $2 {(10:16) Too optimistic to be true!} ( 17... dxc5 18. bxc5 Bxc5 19. Rb1 (19. Bb2 Ng6 20. Nc4 Bb4 21. Re3 Bc5 22. Re1 Bb4 {Looks like a draw.}) 19... b5 (19... Bb5 20. Qc2 Ba7 21. Bxb5 axb5 22. Rxb5 Qc8 23. Nf1 $14) 20. axb6 cxb6 21. Nc4 Ng6 {and White has enough compensation but not more than that.}) 18. Nc4 {(02:18)} Qe7 {(01:30)} 19. Be3 {(05:37)} Bb5 {(03:43) Radjabov tries to get rid of the knight.} (19... Nxe4 20. cxd6 Nxd6 21. Bxf4 gxf4 22. Ncxe5 {Is Kramnik's intention.}) 20. Rc1 { (03:19)} Nxe4 {(18:43) It is hard to suggest anything better. Maybe Radjabov had to play Qf8 and stay tight and hope for the best.} 21. cxd6 {(05:09)} Nxd6 { (00:04)} 22. Bxf4 {(02:35)} gxf4 {(00:56)} 23. Ncxe5 {(02:38)} Bxf1 {(02:59)} 24. Kxf1 {(00:10)} Nb5 {( 01:38) It is easy to blame Radjabov for this move but it is impossible for a human to handle a position with so many weaknesses. This game was decided when Radjabov made the strategic mistake of g5. The kingside's weaknesses are overwhelmingly difficult to defend.} 25. Qd2 { (01:32)} Qf6 {(00:48)} 26. Re4 {(02:15) f4 falls, so does Black's position.} Qg7 {(01:31)} 27. Rxf4 {(00:39)} Rxe5 {(00:04)} 28. Rg4 {(00:14)} Rh5 {(00:41)} 29. Rxg7+ {(01:47)} Kxg7 {( 00:02)} 30. g4 {(00:11) Kramnik craves some more material.} Rxh3 {(00:16)} 31. Kg2 {(00:07)} Rxf3 {(00:04)} 32. Kxf3 {(00:03)} Rd8 {(00:05)} 33. g5 {(01:52) And now checkmating Black's king!} Rd6 {(01:44)} 34. gxh6+ {(02:14) A rather easy game for Kramnik. Radjabov underestimated White's pawn avalanche on the queenside and his own pseudo-attack on the kingside. Once things went the way Kramnik hoped, he never gave any chance to Radjabov for a comeback.} 1-0

Daniel King's on-site report of round nine

 

The biggest upset of the day was the match between England and Iran. Iran came as the heavy underdog with a very modest 2518 average on their top four boards, compared to England's elite 2685 average. It is true that Iran had already surprised many with its team of extremely talented players, all of whom are teenagers with the exception of board one, Ehsan Maghami, but even so, experience and proven ability have to count for something, right?

If it does, it did not come out in this match as both top boards drew fairly easily, but the next boards were where the match was decided. On board four, untitled 13-year-old Alireza Firouzja (2463) lost to Gawain Jones, after missing a decisive tactic:

Gawain Jones - Alireza Firouzja

Whether oversight or simply overwhelmed, Black missed this shot. White to play and win.

This happened fairly early in the match and Firouzja did his best to try and hold, though the situation was clear. Luke McShane, who has not been having a good event at all, went down on board three to the 17-year-old IM Shahin Lorparizangeneh in a tactical conclusion. The Iranian is now assured of a GM norm.

Shahin Lorparizangeneh - Luke McShane

The young Iranians are not the only players making waves at Baku though. 15-year-old IM Anton Smirnov from Australia, rated 2482, has been having a phenomenal tournament with a fantastic 7.0/8 and 2755 performance. His performance is such that all he has to do is appear at the board in round 10 to earn a GM norm.

 

Susan Polgar has a quick interview with Anton Smirnov at the Baku Olympiad. Bear in mind this was recorded almost a week ago, before his incredible run had reached such proportions.

Think all that talk of teenagers on the rise is impressive, then take a look at 64-year-old Eugenio Torre, Asia's first grandmaster, also playing his record breaking 23rd Olympiad. Is it to talk about his desire to still play, and so on? No, it is to describe his own staggering performance, making him a favorite for a gold medal on board three! The senior citizen (ok, ok, he has a couple of months to go still) has played in every round, and has scored 8.0/9 with an amazing 2804 performance. Just amazing.

Eugenio Torre, 64 years old, is on track for a gold medal on board three! (photo by David Llada)

Still, let's not forget about the astonishing Baadur Jobava, whose results have single-handedly kept Georgia in contention for a place on the podium. He continues his winning ways, and in round nine played Richard Rapport from Hungary, whom he defeated in a long endame squeeze. His 7.0/8 is now good for a 3013 performance! (photo by David Llada)

Some of the ChessBase crew at the stand at Baku (photo by David Llada)

Women's Event

The Women's competition was dominated by the key match between the US and China. Whoever left victorious would be a favorite for gold in the end.

 

GM Robert Hess, talking to Daniel King, is the coach of the US Women's team, and he describes the spirit and preparations of the team

Each of these matches seems to be decided by one key game, and a key player of the day. In this round and match that player was Ju Wenjun. Ju Wenjun has not always shown her best at Baku, but for this crucial round she shone when her team needed her the most, as all others had drawn, and won a key victory against Nazi Paikidze to give China the win. China is now in the clear lead. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Harika Dronavalli - Peng Zhaoqin

White finishes off her opponent in style. White to play and win.

 

A quick chat with Canadian talent, 16-year old FM Qiyu Zhou

Russia is still alive in the tournament, though gold seems like a stretch now short of a series of mriacle results. They are tied for third in a group of four and defeated Vietnam in round nine. Their win was signed once again by Valentina Gunina, who is also the highest performer in the Women's event with 7.0/8 and a 2707 performance.

Valentina Gunina - Hoang Thi Bao Tram

Black finds a way to exploit some of the tactical possibilities. Black to play and win material.

Anna Rudolf visits one of the many stalls at the Baku Olyumpiad, this one is purely of handmade chocolates with a chess theme. Chess boards in chocolate, pieces, and more. Yum!

Solutions to positions:

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Round nine games (with times per move)

Select games from the list below the board

Open standings after nine rounds

Rk
SNo
Team
Team
Gms
+
=
-
 TB1   TB2 
1
2
USA
9
7
2
0
16
284,0
2
5
UKR
9
8
0
1
16
267,0
3
1
RUS
9
7
1
1
15
290,0
4
20
GEO
9
6
2
1
14
235,5
5
17
CZE
9
6
2
1
14
235,5
6
9
IND
9
7
0
2
14
234,0
7
25
CAN
9
6
1
2
13
247,5
8
4
AZE
9
6
1
2
13
235,0
9
46
IRI
9
5
3
1
13
229,0
10
6
ENG
9
6
1
2
13
224,5
11
21
LAT
9
6
1
2
13
218,5
12
35
MDA
9
6
1
2
13
218,0
13
32
VIE
9
6
1
2
13
214,5
14
27
GRE
9
4
5
0
13
211,5
15
29
SLO
9
5
3
1
13
210,5

Click to view complete standings

Women's standings after nine rounds

Rk
SNo
Team
Team
Gms
 TB1   TB2 
1
1
CHN
9
7
2
0
16
261,0
2
7
POL
9
7
1
1
15
277,5
3
2
UKR
9
6
2
1
14
268,5
4
3
RUS
9
6
2
1
14
256,0
5
5
IND
9
6
2
1
14
232,5
6
6
USA
9
7
0
2
14
231,0
7
4
GEO
9
6
1
2
13
251,5
8
8
HUN
9
5
3
1
13
230,0
9
10
GER
9
5
3
1
13
219,0
10
15
MGL
9
6
1
2
13
215,5
11
23
FRA
9
6
1
2
13
206,0
12
9
BUL
9
5
3
1
13
206,0
13
18
ISR
9
6
1
2
13
192,0
14
29
LAT
9
5
2
2
12
218,0
15
13
IRI
9
6
0
3
12
216,0

Click to view complete standings

Open section (top pairings)

Bo.
5
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
-
9
India (IND)
Rtg
2½:1½
1.1
GM
Eljanov, Pavel
2739
-
GM
Harikrishna, P.
2752
½-½
1.2
GM
Ponomariov, Ruslan
2709
-
GM
Adhiban, B.
2671
½-½
1.3
GM
Kryvoruchko, Yuriy
2693
-
GM
Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi
2669
½-½
1.4
GM
Korobov, Anton
2675
-
GM
Sethuraman, S.P.
2640
1-0
Bo.
2
United States (USA)
Rtg
-
12
Norway (NOR)
Rtg
3:1
2.1
GM
Caruana, Fabiano
2808
-
GM
Carlsen, Magnus
2857
½-½
2.2
GM
Nakamura, Hikaru
2789
-
GM
Hammer, Jon Ludvig
2651
1-0
2.3
GM
So, Wesley
2782
-
GM
Tari, Aryan
2570
½-½
2.4
GM
Shankland, Samuel L
2679
-
GM
Urkedal, Frode
2537
1-0
Bo.
46
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
-
6
England (ENG)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
GM
Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan
2566
-
GM
Adams, Michael
2738
½-½
3.2
 
Maghsoodloo, Parham
2566
-
GM
Howell, David W L
2665
½-½
3.3
IM
Lorparizangeneh, Shahin
2478
-
GM
McShane, Luke J
2671
1-0
3.4
 
Firouzja, Alireza
2463
-
GM
Jones, Gawain C B
2635
0-1
Bo.
4
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
-
1
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
1:3
4.1
GM
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
2761
-
GM
Karjakin, Sergey
2769
½-½
4.2
GM
Radjabov, Teimour
2722
-
GM
Kramnik, Vladimir
2808
0-1
4.3
GM
Mamedov, Rauf
2666
-
GM
Tomashevsky, Evgeny
2731
½-½
4.4
GM
Naiditsch, Arkadij
2696
-
GM
Grischuk, Alexander
2754
0-1
Bo.
21
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
-
29
Slovenia (SLO)
Rtg
2:2
5.1
GM
Shirov, Alexei
2673
-
GM
Beliavsky, Alexander G
2602
1-0
5.2
GM
Kovalenko, Igor
2651
-
GM
Lenic, Luka
2622
½-½
5.3
GM
Neiksans, Arturs
2628
-
GM
Borisek, Jure
2558
½-½
5.4
IM
Meskovs, Nikita
2476
-
GM
Sebenik, Matej
2526
0-1
Bo.
11
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
-
17
Czech Republic (CZE)
Rtg
1½:2½
6.1
GM
Giri, Anish
2755
-
GM
Navara, David
2742
½-½
6.2
GM
L'Ami, Erwin
2611
-
GM
Laznicka, Viktor
2651
0-1
6.3
GM
Van Wely, Loek
2674
-
GM
Hracek, Zbynek
2591
½-½
6.4
GM
Van Kampen, Robin
2640
-
IM
Plat, Vojtech
2519
½-½
Bo.
10
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
20
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
1½:2½
7.1
GM
Rapport, Richard
2752
-
GM
Jobava, Baadur
2665
0-1
7.2
GM
Berkes, Ferenc
2640
-
GM
Mchedlishvili, Mikheil
2609
0-1
7.3
GM
Almasi, Zoltan
2684
-
GM
Gelashvili, Tamaz
2575
1-0
7.4
GM
Balogh, Csaba
2614
-
GM
Sanikidze, Tornike
2497
½-½
Bo.
36
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
-
47
Chile (CHI)
Rtg
2:2
8.1
GM
Vocaturo, Daniele
2583
-
GM
Morovic Fernandez, Ivan
2554
1-0
8.2
GM
Rombaldoni, Axel
2567
-
GM
Vasquez Schroeder, Rodrigo
2546
0-1
8.3
GM
Brunello, Sabino
2568
-
IM
Henriquez Villagra, Cristobal
2508
½-½
8.4
FM
Moroni, Luca Jr
2459
-
IM
Valenzuela Fuentealba, Luis
2439
½-½
Bo.
27
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
-
19
Turkey (TUR)
Rtg
2:2
9.1
GM
Papaioannou, Ioannis
2631
-
GM
Solak, Dragan
2635
½-½
9.2
GM
Banikas, Hristos
2571
-
GM
Ipatov, Alexander
2652
½-½
9.3
GM
Mastrovasilis, Athanasios
2555
-
GM
Yilmaz, Mustafa
2616
½-½
9.4
GM
Halkias, Stelios
2565
-
GM
Can, Emre
2565
½-½
Bo.
25
Canada (CAN)
Rtg
-
42
Denmark (DEN)
Rtg
3½: ½
10.1
GM
Bareev, Evgeny
2675
-
GM
Hansen, Sune Berg
2595
½-½
10.2
GM
Kovalyov, Anton
2617
-
GM
Andersen, Mads
2535
1-0
10.3
GM
Hansen, Eric
2582
-
GM
Glud, Jakob Vang
2526
1-0
10.4
IM
Krnan, Tomas
2430
-
GM
Schandorff, Lars
2515
1-0
Bo.
32
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
-
28
Azerbaijan 2 (AZE2)
Rtg
2½:1½
11.1
GM
Le, Quang Liem
2723
-
GM
Durarbayli, Vasif
2612
1-0
11.2
GM
Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son
2633
-
GM
Abasov, Nijat
2552
½-½
11.3
FM
Nguyen, Anh Khoi
2448
-
GM
Guseinov, Gadir
2625
½-½
11.4
GM
Dao, Thien Hai
2486
-
GM
Guliyev, Namig
2577
½-½
Bo.
35
Moldova (MDA)
Rtg
-
24
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
3:1
12.1
GM
Bologan, Victor
2648
-
GM
Ivanisevic, Ivan
2650
½-½
12.2
GM
Iordachescu, Viorel
2584
-
GM
Markus, Robert
2662
½-½
12.3
GM
Svetushkin, Dmitry
2543
-
GM
Indjic, Aleksandar
2548
1-0
12.4
IM
Hamitevici, Vladimir
2489
-
GM
Markovic, Miroslav
2459
1-0

Women's section (top pairings)

Bo.
6
United States (USA)
Rtg
-
1
China (CHN)
Rtg
1½:2½
1.1
GM
Krush, Irina
2444
-
GM
Hou, Yifan
2658
½-½
1.2
IM
Paikidze, Nazi
2366
-
GM
Ju, Wenjun
2583
0-1
1.3
IM
Zatonskih, Anna
2449
-
WGM
Tan, Zhongyi
2475
½-½
1.4
WGM
Nemcova, Katerina
2365
-
IM
Guo, Qi
2417
½-½
Bo.
18
Israel (ISR)
Rtg
-
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
½ :3½
2.1
WIM
Shvayger, Yuliya
2408
-
GM
Socko, Monika
2437
0-1
2.2
WIM
Efroimski, Marsel
2322
-
WGM
Zawadzka, Jolanta
2429
0-1
2.3
IM
Klinova, Masha
2290
-
WGM
Kulon, Klaudia
2346
½-½
2.4
WIM
Gutmakher, Olga
2216
-
WIM
Wozniak, Mariola
2246
0-1
Bo.
19
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
-
3
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
1½:2½
3.1
IM
Pham, Le Thao Nguyen
2338
-
GM
Kosteniuk, Alexandra
2538
½-½
3.2
WGM
Hoang, Thi Bao Tram
2325
-
GM
Gunina, Valentina
2520
0-1
3.3
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung
2316
-
WGM
Goryachkina, Aleksandra
2475
½-½
3.4
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Thanh An
2249
-
WGM
Pogonina, Natalija
2484
½-½
Bo.
2
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
-
16
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
3½: ½
4.1
GM
Muzychuk, Anna
2550
-
WGM
Mamedjarova, Zeinab
2295
1-0
4.2
GM
Muzychuk, Mariya
2539
-
WGM
Mammadzada, Gunay
2361
1-0
4.3
GM
Ushenina, Anna
2457
-
WGM
Mammadova, Gulnar
2304
½-½
4.4
IM
Gaponenko, Inna
2416
-
WFM
Hojjatova, Aydan
2339
1-0
Bo.
5
India (IND)
Rtg
-
21
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
3:1
5.1
GM
Harika, Dronavalli
2542
-
GM
Peng, Zhaoqin
2368
1-0
5.2
IM
Padmini, Rout
2408
-
WGM
Haast, Anne
2306
0-1
5.3
IM
Tania, Sachdev
2402
-
FM
Kazarian, Anna-Maja
2231
1-0
5.4
WGM
Soumya, Swaminathan
2379
-
 
Keetman, Maaike
2221
1-0
Bo.
8
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
9
Bulgaria (BUL)
Rtg
2:2
6.1
GM
Hoang, Thanh Trang
2467
-
GM
Stefanova, Antoaneta
2515
½-½
6.2
IM
Lazarne Vajda, Szidonia
2372
-
WGM
Nikolova, Adriana
2358
½-½
6.3
WGM
Papp, Petra
2336
-
WIM
Raeva, Elitsa
2232
½-½
6.4
IM
Gara, Anita
2355
-
WGM
Voiska, Margarita
2290
½-½
Bo.
4
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
52
Turkmenistan (TKM)
Rtg
3:1
7.1
GM
Dzagnidze, Nana
2522
-
WGM
Geldiyeva, Mahri
2285
½-½
7.2
IM
Javakhishvili, Lela
2486
-
WFM
Ovezdurdiyeva, Jemal
2031
½-½
7.3
GM
Khotenashvili, Bela
2463
-
WFM
Atabayeva, Gozel
2021
1-0
7.4
IM
Batsiashvili, Nino
2474
-
WFM
Hallaeva, Bahar
2103
1-0
Bo.
27
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
-
10
Germany (GER)
Rtg
1:3
8.1
WGM
Rapport, Jovana
2318
-
IM
Paehtz, Elisabeth
2474
½-½
8.2
 
Velikic, Adela
2260
-
WGM
Michna, Marta
2383
0-1
8.3
WIM
Eric, Jovana
2161
-
WGM
Levushkina, Elena
2342
½-½
8.4
WIM
Drljevic, Ljilja
2207
-
WIM
Fuchs, Judith
2287
0-1
Bo.
15
Mongolia (MGL)
Rtg
-
46
Philippines (PHI)
Rtg
2½:1½
9.1
IM
Nomin-Erdene, Davaademberel
2422
-
WIM
Frayna, Janelle Mae
2281
½-½
9.2
IM
Batchimeg, Tuvshintugs
2391
-
WIM
Fronda, Jan Jodilyn
2128
1-0
9.3
WGM
Enkhtuul, Altan-Ulzii
2288
-
WIM
Secopito, Catherine
2119
½-½
9.4
WIM
Lkhamsuren, Uuganbayar
2147
-
WFM
Mendoza, Shania Mae
1965
½-½
Bo.
23
France (FRA)
Rtg
-
28
Azerbaijan 2 (AZE2)
Rtg
3:1
10.1
IM
Milliet, Sophie
2362
-
WGM
Mamedjarova, Turkan
2304
1-0
10.2
IM
Collas, Silvia
2301
-
WIM
Khalafova, Narmin
2219
½-½
10.3
WGM
Maisuradze, Nino
2256
-
WIM
Fataliyeva, Ulviyya
2234
½-½
10.4
WIM
Navrotescu, Andreea-Cristiana
2235
-
WGM
Umudova, Nargiz
2247
1-0
Bo.
13
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
-
20
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
2½:1½
11.1
IM
Khademalsharieh, Sarasadat
2429
-
IM
Zimina, Olga
2389
½-½
11.2
WGM
Pourkashiyan, Atousa
2335
-
FM
Brunello, Marina
2376
½-½
11.3
WGM
Hejazipour, Mitra
2314
-
WFM
Movileanu, Daniela
2268
1-0
11.4
WIM
Hakimifard, Ghazal
2308
-
WFM
Di Benedetto, Desiree
2183
½-½
Bo.
24
Cuba (CUB)
Rtg
-
11
Romania (ROU)
Rtg
2:2
12.1
WGM
Arribas Robaina, Maritza
2315
-
IM
Peptan, Corina-Isabela
2394
½-½
12.2
WGM
Linares Napoles, Oleiny
2276
-
WGM
Cosma, Elena-Luminita
2331
½-½
12.3
WIM
Llaudy Pupo, Lisandra
2269
-
IM
Bulmaga, Irina
2395
0-1
12.4
WIM
Hernandez Moya, Yuleisy
2264
-
WIM
Dragomirescu, Angela
2227
1-0

Olympiad schedule

Date Time Event, function
11 September 15:00 Round 9
12 September 15:00 Round 10
13 September 11:00/19:30 Round 11/Closing Ceremony
14 September All day Departure day

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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kyle therrell kyle therrell 9/13/2016 07:21
Regarding the opening of Kramnik-Radjabov: 5. d4 wouldn't quite "enter the Max Lange" -- that would require 5...ed, but there is also the major/traditional possibility of 5...Bxd4.

(I "admit" to being someone whose basic opening learning took place before GM Moradiabadi was born ...)
Karbuncle Karbuncle 9/13/2016 05:06
@ Sivakumar: Of the top 3, only GM So is not home-grown. But to be honest, the only reason you'd make such a snide remark is because you're jelly.
sivakumar R sivakumar R 9/13/2016 04:58
US Motto: if you can't do, immigrate unto you, those who can...
malfa malfa 9/12/2016 04:54
@hserusk, that Carlsen may not have serious contenders for a long time to go is an entirely different question, which has nothing to do with the olympic title. However, restraining myself to Caruana as a possibile challenger, personally I do not see him as a creditable challenger yet.
hserusk hserusk 9/12/2016 04:10
@Malfa and KevinC, Perhaps. (though aiming to do good and playing for a win -not recklessly mind you but with the attitude to be willing to score and not just survive I bet does make a good team player. It's called scoring for the team.)
But that a player ranked 4th in the world having that attitude going into a game -well now that just means that Carlsen will stay the world champion for a long while ;-)
KevinC KevinC 9/12/2016 01:33
@hserusk, The cardinal rule in a team event is DO NOT LOSE. A draw is acceptable, especially on board one versus a strong player, but when you lose, especially by playing some "extreme", you put the team behind the ball.
weerogue weerogue 9/12/2016 12:28
Brilliant coverage, thanks very much for this. I'm especially enjoying the focus on highlighting some of the special performances away from the very top tables, and of course the tactics puzzles!
malfa malfa 9/12/2016 12:17
@hserusk, so it is well known that Bobby played exclusively for himself, which is the last thing to be desired from a team member. Could it be that precisely for this reason never did Fischer contribute to a gold medal for the USA, while Caruana already has a chance? ;-)
hserusk hserusk 9/12/2016 10:05
@Anthe, So? (You reckon their fellow countryman Fischer would think that way?)
Anthe Anthe 9/12/2016 09:23
@hserusk It s a team event...
hserusk hserusk 9/12/2016 08:44
Caruana, (with white pieces) "I didn't wanna do anything too extreme" (Translation : I don't wanna play for a win even with white pieces)
Well folks, there we have it.
It's not computers affecting game preparation these days, not about competition at the highest level being closely matched, it's just the attitude and the approach going into the game itself.
Looks like other top players (ratings-wise) are genuinely afraid of Carlsen.
Kind of reminds us of Vishy and Garry back in the day while Kramnik always maintained that Vishy is not a lesser player than Garry -it's psychology at play instead.
jsaldea12 jsaldea12 9/12/2016 01:10
Flash news: Legendary ageless grand master Eugene Torre of the Philippines won his 9th game against Flores of Argentina. He has total points of 8 out of 9 games, no loss, two draws. GM Torre is PLAYING FOR GOLD this Chess Olympiad 2016. Filipino-born Super GM So satisfied himself, draw this 9th round after his USA teammates had already finished, winning, their games. He is playing for GOLD , not for himself, but ensure gold for USA team who is leading this tourney.
Super GM So met the Philippine team, especially, the legendary GM Eugene Torre. It was a happy reunion, makes no difference that GM So is playing for USA, he is still a filipino by birth
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