2016 Baku Rd8: USA versus Russia

by Albert Silver
9/11/2016 – They were without a doubt the matches on everyone's mind. In both the Open and the Women's events, Russia faced the USA, and the promise of thrilling top-notch fights did not disappoint. In the Open section, the USA came within a whisker of defeating the top-rated Russian team, with a key win by Welsey So over Nepomniachtchi, balanced by a tragic last-minute blunder by Ray Robson against Grischuk. As to the Women, the Americans beat Russia after a big win by Krush over Kosteniuk. Full report with analysis by GM Wesley So and more!

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2016 Baku Olympiad

All games start at 3 p.m. local time = 1 p.m. in Europe (CEST), one hour earlier in Britain, and 2 p.m. in Moscow. You can find the starting time at your location here.

Watch it live on Playchess!

Round eight

What a fascinating round, with both the Open and Women competition sharing a massive Russia vs USA match at the summit. Although these were hardly the only newsworthy matches, they certainly hogged the attention of spectators by and large.

The number one match was understandably in the Open section as both teams shared a near identical average rating on the top four boards with a history that stretches back… forever. Or so it seems. Who can forget the 1986 Dubai Olympiad, 30 years ago, when the Soviet Union, with a rating average in excess of 100 Elo over the United States, was taken down in an epic match in which GM Yasser Seirawan defeated reigning World Champion Garry Kasparov on board one, to clinch it?

The match score in round eight in Dubai 1986

The author of that historic win was none other than Yasser Seirawan, captain of the US WOmen's team (see below for more on their result) and author of the wonderful DVD "My Best Games" (photo by David Llada)

Granted there were no Cold War metaphors this time round, but there is always something special about a match between the two nations.

Both teams came with their hottest players, though the US chose to replace Shankland with Robson, since although Shankland had somehow prevailed in his game the previous round by some miracle, it might be asking too much to hope lightning will strike twice.

Guess where the press was focused? (photo by E. Kublashvili)

The top board was of course Fabiano Caruana against Sergey Karjakin, and although the American did sweat a bit in the game (and US fans), he ultimately held and drew. Hikaru Nakamura’s game against Vladimir Kramnik was also a ho-hum affair, and though both came with a willingness to fight, it resulted in a dry rook endgame with no water to squeeze out of.

Wesley So has been the brightest star of the US team as far as performances go, and while every team win is a team effort, his personal contribution to their results has been 7.0/8 and a massive 2926 performance. (photo by E. Kublashvili)

The real action took place on the last boards. In fact, it was the third board that held the promise of a US victory, as Wesley So, facing a hitherto imperious Ian Nepomniachtchi, obtained a near decisive advantage in the opening, which he never let go.

Wesley So analyzes his win over Ian Nepomniachtchi

 

The last game seemed to scream draw throughout, as Ray Robson and Alexander Grischuk played out a dead equal endgame. There was little to say until move 35, when White suddenly no longer seemed content with the draw. Things degenerated quickly from there and to the Russians’ relief, Grischuk won and tied the match.

GMs Alejandro Ramirez and Daniel King provided video commentary on Playchess in their typically dynamic and entertaining style. (photo by Paul Truong)

This was hardly the only noteworthy match, as England and India squared off in a very tough encounter that was ultimately decided by a win by GM Sethuraman against Nigel Short on board four, giving the Indians an important victory. This put them in a tie with the United States for first.

Ahmed Adly - Edgardo Ortiz

Black had taken on e4 with his knight and White recaptured with Bxe4. Black was planning on Rxe4 until he realized what he had done. What had he missed after ...Rxe4 that caused him to resign instead?

If much has been made of the 100% score by Nepomniachtchi, a run that ended in round eight, it is time to mention the current top scoring player of all on board one: the Georgian player Baadur Jobava.

Jobava’s fantastic 6.0/7 score has been good for an amazing 2976 performance until now, and even in round eight, facing the powerful Ukrainian team, he managed to defeat Ruslan Ponomariov in just 21 moves. (photo by Paul Truong)

Baadur Jobava - Ruslan Ponomariov

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.10"] [Round "8.5"] [White "Jobava, Baadur"] [Black "Ponomariov, Ruslan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A45"] [WhiteElo "2665"] [BlackElo "2709"] [PlyCount "41"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "team-tourn"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Georgia"] [BlackTeam "Ukraine"] [WhiteTeamCountry "GEO"] [BlackTeamCountry "UKR"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. d4 {(00:00)} Nf6 {(00:00)} 2. Nc3 {(00:00)} d5 {(00:00)} 3. Bf4 {(00:00)} c5 {(00:39)} 4. e3 {(00:00)} cxd4 {(00:40)} 5. exd4 {(00:00)} a6 {(00:12)} 6. Bd3 {(00:04)} Nc6 {(00:28)} 7. Nge2 {(00:04)} e6 {(00:58)} 8. Qd2 {(05:00)} b5 { (04:02)} 9. O-O {(01:10)} Be7 {(02:00)} 10. a3 {(07:20)} Bd7 {(04:29)} 11. h3 { ( 00:08)} O-O {(01:13)} 12. Rfe1 {(04:53)} Na5 {(09:56)} 13. Rad1 {(07:37)} Qb6 {(06:05)} 14. Ng3 {(06:29)} Rfc8 {(06:56)} 15. Nf5 {(18:47) At first sight this looks a bit risky. Consider the continuation:} exf5 {(03:08)} 16. Rxe7 { (00:03)} Be6 {[#] (00:08) The rook looks trapped doesn't it? The only way out would seem to be by giving up the exchange, and Ponomariov quite possibly spent time evaluating such a sacrifice, but Jobava has other ideas in mind.} 17. Bh6 $3 {(01:15) Absolutely stellar.} gxh6 {(27:39)} ({For example,} 17... Kf8 {fails to} 18. Bxg7+ Kxe7 19. Bxf6+ {and if Black takes the bishop...} Kxf6 20. Nxd5+ $1 Bxd5 21. Qh6+) ({and} 17... Kh8 18. Bxg7+ Kxg7 19. Qg5+ Kf8 20. Qxf6 {transposes to the game.}) 18. Qxh6 {(00:05)} Rxc3 {(00:08)} 19. Qg5+ { (01:15)} Kf8 {(00:28)} 20. Qxf6 {(00:04)} Rxd3 {(18:35)} 21. cxd3 {(01:04)} 1-0

Unfortunately for him, his team still lost 3-1. For the Ukrainians, this means they are the third team to share first with the US and India.

The young overperforming Iranians mentioned in the previous report continued their good run by tying Italy 2-2 (photo by M. Emelianova)

It should be pointed out that they came very close to winning as their talented second board Parham Maghsoodloo, untitled and rated 2566, had a significant advantage in his game, but was unable to convert it. This success sets them up for a very intriguing match against England, who outrate them by some 200 Elo on average.

Yusup Ayabayev - Stef Soors

Black just played Nb8 to cover the check, but this is not the end to the back rank threats. White to play and win.

Whatever hopes the Chinese had still harbored for a miracle comeback were dashed as they went down to the Hungarian team 1.5-2.5. This also means Hungary is in 10th place, and can still dream of a medal, if the stars align just right. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Magnus Carlsen started slow, but has gradually helped Norway time climb to the top. (photo by David Llada)

One unexpected twist has been Norway’s stead rise. Their start had really been nothing to write home about it is true, and Magnus Carlsen had seemed uninspired. He wasn’t losing, it is true, but nor was he winning as one might hope. With four wins and one draw in the last five matches, they have climbed the ladder, and are now parked in the group just behind the leaders. This has set up a match many had begun to think would not happen: in round nine, Norway will face the USA.

Team Canada has been sticking to the script, losing to the higher rated teams, and beating the weaker ones. This isn’t to say their results have been uninteresting. Board two, Anton Kovalyov (2617), has had a superb run so far, scoring 5.5/7 and a 2822 performance. (photo by M. Emelianova)

 

His teammate Eric Hansen (2582) has also played well for his team, with 6.0/8 and a 2646 performance. He has also been posting a vlog (video log) on his YouTube channel with comments and feedback from Baku.

Perparim Makolli - Mohammed Al-Sayed

With all his pieces pointed in the right direction, and the White king in the center, there must be something right? Black to play and win.

Round 9 report by Daniel king direct from Baku

 

In the Women’s section, the big match was also Russia against the US, but here things were far more dramatic with swings to leave anyone watching with unsightly hand after all the nailbiting.

This is the board where it was all decided (photo by Paul Truong)

Board four was the quickest to end as American player Katerina Nemcova defeated Olga Girya very quickly, while Natalija Pogonina and Anna Zatonskih seemed to make little progress and drew. Girya’s loss seemed to be easily balanced by a crushing win by Valentina Gunina, Russia’s ‘secret weapon’, against Nazi Paikidze. This left the longest and least clear game: Alexandra Kosteniuk against Irina Krush on board one, analyzed here by GM Elshan Moradiabadi.

Alexandra Kosteniuk - Irina Krush (annotated by GM Elshan Moradiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Women"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.10"] [Round "8.1"] [White "Kosteniuk, Alexandra"] [Black "Krush, Irina"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B42"] [WhiteElo "2538"] [BlackElo "2444"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "134"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "team-tourn"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "United States"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "USA"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] {Today saw an epic victory for the undergunned US women's team against Russia, the incumbent champions. In this topsy-turvy match, Katerina Nemcova first put the US team in the lead only to see Valentina Gunina equalize by beating Nazi Paikidze. With Zatonskih and Pogonina ending in a draw, it all came down to the mighty first board clash on board one, where ex-world champion GM Alexandra Kosteniuk faced multiple US women's champion GM Irina Krush.} 1. e4 {(0s)} c5 {(0s)} 2. Nf3 {(0s)} e6 {(2s)} 3. d4 { (0s)} cxd4 {(6s)} 4. Nxd4 {(0s)} a6 {(16s) Krush plays the "Kan-Paulsen" system, whose disappearance from top-level competition might lead one to think it is considered "risky'. Nevertheless, in such a crucial match, only those who have the guts and eagerness to take such risks can hope for victory.} 5. Bd3 { (24s)} Nf6 {(35s)} 6. O-O {(88s)} Qc7 {(30s)} 7. Qe2 {(268s)} d6 {(28s)} 8. a4 {(93s)} (8. c4 {is the mainline.}) 8... b6 {(439s) otherwise a5 would have fixed Black's queenside.} 9. f4 {(249s) Already an uncommon way of handling this opening.} Nbd7 {(176s)} 10. b4 $5 $146 {(503s) An interesting novelty by Kosteniuk. The bishop will go to b2 while the c5 square is taken away from Black. A very creative idea by Kosteniuk.} d5 $2 {(1357s) Krush's reaction is very human but rather overly optimistic. She gives away more space when her king is still in the center.} (10... e5 11. Nf5 Bb7 {was probably a better choice and what Kosteniuk had probably prepared for.}) 11. e5 {(284s)} Ne4 { (18s) White cannot win a pawn on e4 because her pawn on b4 is en prise. Nevertheless, I assure you that White does not want that pawn at the cost of her light squared bishop which would give Black a lot of compensation along the a8-h1 diagonal and c and d files.} 12. Ba3 {( 564s)} a5 {(413s)} (12... Bb7 13. c4 {looks close to lost for Black. Irina Krush is in deep trouble.}) 13. Nb5 { (412s)} Qc6 {(193s)} 14. bxa5 {(191s)} Bc5+ {(1092s)} (14... Bxa3 15. N1xa3 O-O 16. c4 Ndc5 {Looks bad but playable for Black.}) 15. Bxc5 {(54s)} Ndxc5 $6 { (23s) Irina misses a nasty tactic.} 16. Na7 $1 {(607s) Kosteniuk has played superbly so far. The knight on a7 is 'untouchable'} Qc7 {(99s)} (16... Rxa7 $4 17. Bb5 {and the pin costs Black a queen.}) 17. axb6 {(77s)} Qxb6 {(30s)} 18. Nxc8 {(8s)} Rxc8 {(70 s)} 19. Bb5+ {(37s)} Nd7+ {(363s)} 20. Kh1 {(5s)} Qa7 { (19s)} 21. Bd3 {(481s)} Ndc5 {(541s)} (21... O-O 22. Bxe4 dxe4 23. Qxe4 Nb6 24. Nd2 Rfd8 25. Rfd1 Qa5 {surprisingly gives Black good chances to fight for a draw.}) 22. Qe3 {(138s)} Rc7 $6 {(51s) This again loses a tempo.} (22... Ra8 {was necessary and Black should hope to hold a middlgame a pawn down.}) 23. Na3 { (223s)} Qa5 {(395s)} 24. Nb5 {(218s)} Rc8 {(8s)} 25. Nd4 $6 {(132s) This lets go off some of White's advantage.} (25. Bxe4 Nxe4 26. Qa3 {followed by f5 looks very nasty.}) 25... O-O {(36s)} 26. Bb5 {(167s)} Ra8 {(81s)} 27. Rf3 $6 { (269s) An inappropriate square for the rook.} (27. Rfe1 {with the idea of c4 or f5 to undermine Black's strong centralized knights.}) 27... Qb4 {(261s)} 28. Bc6 {(597s)} Ra6 $6 {(145s)} (28... Rac8 29. f5 Qb8 {was probably better.}) 29. f5 {(27s)} Rc8 {(296s)} 30. Bb5 {(40s)} Raa8 {(15s)} 31. c3 $6 {(244s)} (31. Rd1 {is a strong prophylactic move which prevents Black's attempt to exchange queens.}) 31... Qb2 {(21s)} 32. Raf1 $6 {(24 s)} (32. Rd1 {This is still better.} Nxa4 $2 33. fxe6 fxe6 34. Bd7 {with a winning attack.}) 32... Qd2 {(55s) } 33. fxe6 {(62s)} fxe6 {(2s)} 34. Nc6 $6 {(217s)} Rc7 {(53s)} 35. Qd4 { (58s) Most of White's advantage has fizzled out.} h6 $1 {(20s) A necessary vent for Black's king when neither side has much to improve.} 36. Qb4 {(36s)} Qg5 {(51s) Ok, but a bit counter-intuitive.} (36... Rb7 {forces} 37. a5 { and now} Kh7 $1 {with a difficult position for... White!} 38. Nd4 {for instance runs into} Qa2) 37. g3 {(71s)} Qd2 {(31s)} 38. Nd4 {(32s)} Qg5 {(28s)} 39. Nc6 {(15s)} Qd2 {(16s)} 40. Nd4 {(0s)} Qg5 {(0s)} 41. Bc6 {(889s)} Rac8 {(221s)} 42. c4 {(123s)} Qd2 {(848s)} 43. Qxd2 $6 {(524s)} (43. Rf8+ {is a beautiful trick but it is in vain. Nevertheless, it was better than exchanging queens.} Kh7 (43... Rxf8 $4 44. Rxf8+ Kxf8 45. Qb8+ Ke7 46. Qe8#)) 43... Nxd2 {(9s)} 44. cxd5 {(1s)} Nxf3 {(69s)} 45. Rxf3 {(4s)} exd5 {(25s) Krush's stubborn play paid off. She is back in the game with full control. With all these open files in this position, Black's rooks would 'rule' the board and White's extra pawns for the exchange are 'weak' compensation. Nevertheless, White should be able to hold with accurate play.} 46. Bxd5+ {(30s)} Kh7 {(143s)} 47. Rf4 $2 {(398s) I do not understand this move. White needed some active play with e6.} (47. e6 $1 Nxa4 48. Re3 Nb6 49. Bc6 Nc4 50. Re1 Rxc6 51. Nxc6 Rxc6 52. e7 Nd6 53. e8=Q Nxe8 54. Rxe8 $11) 47... Rd7 {(284s)} 48. Bc4 {(2s)} g5 $1 { (64s) Now we have the proof of why Rf4 was wrong.} 49. e6 {(8s)} gxf4 {(294 s)} 50. exd7 {(1s)} Nxd7 {(11s)} 51. Bd3+ {(26s)} Kh8 {(24s)} 52. Bf5 {(68s)} Rc1+ {(45s)} 53. Kg2 {(3s)} Nc5 {(43s)} 54. gxf4 {(94s) White parts with her pawns, but she really does not have any choice.} (54. Ne2 f3+ $1 55. Kxf3 Rf1+ 56. Kg4 Rf2) 54... Nxa4 {(23s)} 55. Kg3 {(27s)} Nc5 {(38s)} 56. Ne6 {(88s)} Nd7 {( 121s)} 57. Nd4 {(61s)} Nf6 {(16s)} 58. Nf3 {(8s)} Rc3 {(26s) White's f4 pawn will collapse soon.} 59. h3 {(66s)} Kg7 {(47s)} 60. Bb1 {(9 s)} Rc4 {(65s) } 61. Ne5 {(31s)} Rb4 {(7s)} 62. Bg6 {(14s)} Nd5 {(26s)} 63. Bf5 {(68s)} Nxf4 { (56s) Now Black should be technically winning.} 64. Ng4 {(22s)} Ne2+ {(55s)} 65. Kh4 {(19s)} Nd4 {(38s)} 66. Be4 {(29s)} Ne6 {(10s)} 67. Bg2 {(44s)} h5 $1 { (14s) An elegant finish for a well-fought battle. Kosteniuk won the first half of the match but Krush won the second half and unfortunately for Kosteniuk, Irina Krush only made the 'penultimate' mistake in this game!} (67... h5 68. Kxh5 Nf4+) 0-1

A fantastic win with blood and guts throughout, pushing the American women to the top of the leaderboard.

However, this was not the end of it, as top-seed China trampled Azerbaijan by 3.5-0.5 and join the US in first. This sets up an epic match for Sunday, not to be missed: China versus USA!

Hou Yifan - Zeinab Mamedjarova

The Women World Champion finds a little tactic that wins a pawn. White to play and win.

Solutions to the puzzles

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Round eight games (with times per move)

Select games from the list below the board

Open standings after eight rounds

Rk
SNo
Team
Team
Gms
 TB1   TB2 
1
2
USA
8
6
2
0
14
222,0
2
9
IND
8
7
0
1
14
196,0
3
5
UKR
8
7
0
1
14
196,0
4
1
RUS
8
6
1
1
13
215,0
5
4
AZE
8
6
1
1
13
201,5
6
12
NOR
8
6
1
1
13
168,0
7
6
ENG
8
6
0
2
12
189,5
8
21
LAT
8
6
0
2
12
188,0
9
11
NED
8
6
0
2
12
187,0
10
10
HUN
8
6
0
2
12
184,5
11
46
IRI
8
5
2
1
12
183,5
12
17
CZE
8
5
2
1
12
182,5
13
20
GEO
8
5
2
1
12
181,5
14
27
GRE
8
4
4
0
12
178,0
15
29
SLO
8
5
2
1
12
168,5

Click to view complete standings

Women's standings after eight rounds

Rk
SNo
Team
Team
Gms
 TB1   TB2 
1
1
CHN
8
6
2
0
14
206,0
2
6
USA
8
7
0
1
14
187,5
3
7
POL
8
6
1
1
13
212,0
4
18
ISR
8
6
1
1
13
168,0
5
2
UKR
8
5
2
1
12
210,5
6
3
RUS
8
5
2
1
12
207,0
7
5
IND
8
5
2
1
12
186,5
8
8
HUN
8
5
2
1
12
178,0
9
9
BUL
8
5
2
1
12
170,0
10
16
AZE
8
5
2
1
12
169,5
11
19
VIE
8
5
2
1
12
169,0
12
21
NED
8
6
0
2
12
164,0
13
4
GEO
8
5
1
2
11
194,5
14
10
GER
8
4
3
1
11
167,0
15
27
SRB
8
5
1
2
11
166,0

Click to view complete standings

Open section (top pairings)

Bo.
1
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
-
2
United States (USA)
Rtg
2:2
1.1
GM
Karjakin, Sergey
2769
-
GM
Caruana, Fabiano
2808
½-½
1.2
GM
Kramnik, Vladimir
2808
-
GM
Nakamura, Hikaru
2789
½-½
1.3
GM
Nepomniachtchi, Ian
2740
-
GM
So, Wesley
2782
0-1
1.4
GM
Grischuk, Alexander
2754
-
GM
Robson, Ray
2674
1-0
Bo.
20
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
5
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
1:3
2.1
GM
Jobava, Baadur
2665
-
GM
Ponomariov, Ruslan
2709
1-0
2.2
GM
Mchedlishvili, Mikheil
2609
-
GM
Kryvoruchko, Yuriy
2693
0-1
2.3
GM
Pantsulaia, Levan
2601
-
GM
Korobov, Anton
2675
0-1
2.4
GM
Gelashvili, Tamaz
2575
-
GM
Volokitin, Andrei
2647
0-1
Bo.
6
England (ENG)
Rtg
-
9
India (IND)
Rtg
1½:2½
3.1
GM
Adams, Michael
2738
-
GM
Harikrishna, P.
2752
½-½
3.2
GM
Howell, David W L
2665
-
GM
Adhiban, B.
2671
½-½
3.3
GM
Jones, Gawain C B
2635
-
GM
Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi
2669
½-½
3.4
GM
Short, Nigel D
2666
-
GM
Sethuraman, S.P.
2640
0-1
Bo.
4
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
-
21
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
2½:1½
4.1
GM
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
2761
-
GM
Shirov, Alexei
2673
½-½
4.2
GM
Radjabov, Teimour
2722
-
GM
Kovalenko, Igor
2651
½-½
4.3
GM
Mamedov, Rauf
2666
-
GM
Neiksans, Arturs
2628
½-½
4.4
GM
Safarli, Eltaj
2688
-
IM
Meskovs, Nikita
2476
1-0
Bo.
36
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
-
46
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
2:2
5.1
GM
Vocaturo, Daniele
2583
-
GM
Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan
2566
½-½
5.2
GM
Dvirnyy, Danyyil
2543
-
 
Maghsoodloo, Parham
2566
½-½
5.3
GM
Brunello, Sabino
2568
-
IM
Lorparizangeneh, Shahin
2478
½-½
5.4
FM
Moroni, Luca Jr
2459
-
 
Firouzja, Alireza
2463
½-½
Bo.
27
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
-
29
Slovenia (SLO)
Rtg
2:2
6.1
GM
Papaioannou, Ioannis
2631
-
GM
Beliavsky, Alexander G
2602
1-0
6.2
GM
Mastrovasilis, Dimitrios
2601
-
GM
Lenic, Luka
2622
0-1
6.3
GM
Mastrovasilis, Athanasios
2555
-
GM
Borisek, Jure
2558
0-1
6.4
GM
Halkias, Stelios
2565
-
GM
Skoberne, Jure
2562
1-0
Bo.
12
Norway (NOR)
Rtg
-
34
Peru (PER)
Rtg
3:1
7.1
GM
Carlsen, Magnus
2857
-
GM
Cordova, Emilio
2638
1-0
7.2
GM
Hammer, Jon Ludvig
2651
-
GM
Cori, Jorge
2609
0-1
7.3
GM
Tari, Aryan
2570
-
IM
Vera Siguenas, Deivy
2499
1-0
7.4
GM
Urkedal, Frode
2537
-
GM
Cruz, Cristhian
2519
1-0
Bo.
25
Canada (CAN)
Rtg
-
32
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
2:2
8.1
GM
Bareev, Evgeny
2675
-
GM
Le, Quang Liem
2723
½-½
8.2
GM
Kovalyov, Anton
2617
-
GM
Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son
2633
½-½
8.3
GM
Lesiege, Alexandre
2512
-
GM
Nguyen, Huynh Minh Huy
2435
½-½
8.4
GM
Hansen, Eric
2582
-
FM
Nguyen, Anh Khoi
2448
½-½
Bo.
11
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
-
15
Cuba (CUB)
Rtg
2½:1½
9.1
GM
Giri, Anish
2755
-
GM
Dominguez Perez, Leinier
2720
½-½
9.2
GM
L'Ami, Erwin
2611
-
GM
Bruzon Batista, Lazaro
2623
1-0
9.3
GM
Van Kampen, Robin
2640
-
GM
Quesada Perez, Yuniesky
2636
1-0
9.4
GM
Bok, Benjamin
2592
-
GM
Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo
2581
0-1
Bo.
3
China (CHN)
Rtg
-
10
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
1½:2½
10.1
GM
Ding, Liren
2753
-
GM
Rapport, Richard
2752
½-½
10.2
GM
Yu, Yangyi
2725
-
GM
Berkes, Ferenc
2640
½-½
10.3
GM
Li, Chao b
2746
-
GM
Almasi, Zoltan
2684
0-1
10.4
GM
Wei, Yi
2717
-
IM
Gledura, Benjamin
2585
½-½
Bo.
17
Czech Republic (CZE)
Rtg
-
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
2½:1½
11.1
GM
Navara, David
2742
-
GM
Wojtaszek, Radoslaw
2736
½-½
11.2
GM
Laznicka, Viktor
2651
-
GM
Duda, Jan-Krzysztof
2675
1-0
11.3
GM
Babula, Vlastimil
2540
-
GM
Bartel, Mateusz
2646
½-½
11.4
IM
Plat, Vojtech
2519
-
GM
Piorun, Kacper
2681
½-½
Bo.
47
Chile (CHI)
Rtg
-
59
Singapore (SIN)
Rtg
3:1
12.1
GM
Morovic Fernandez, Ivan
2554
-
GM
Zhang, Zhong
2637
0-1
12.2
GM
Vasquez Schroeder, Rodrigo
2546
-
IM
Goh, Wei Ming Kevin
2444
1-0
12.3
IM
Henriquez Villagra, Cristobal
2508
-
IM
Tin, Jingyao
2439
1-0
12.4
FM
Perez Gormaz, Matias
2444
-
 
Foo, Zhi Rong Benjamin
2233
1-0

Women's section (top pairings)

Bo.
3
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
-
6
United States (USA)
Rtg
1½:2½
1.1
GM
Kosteniuk, Alexandra
2538
-
GM
Krush, Irina
2444
0-1
1.2
GM
Gunina, Valentina
2520
-
IM
Paikidze, Nazi
2366
1-0
1.3
WGM
Pogonina, Natalija
2484
-
IM
Zatonskih, Anna
2449
½-½
1.4
WGM
Girya, Olga
2452
-
WGM
Nemcova, Katerina
2365
0-1
Bo.
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
-
21
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
2½:1½
2.1
GM
Socko, Monika
2437
-
WGM
Haast, Anne
2306
0-1
2.2
WGM
Szczepkowska-Horowska, Karina
2409
-
IM
Lanchava, Tea
2258
½-½
2.3
WGM
Kulon, Klaudia
2346
-
FM
Kazarian, Anna-Maja
2231
1-0
2.4
WIM
Wozniak, Mariola
2246
-
 
Keetman, Maaike
2221
1-0
Bo.
8
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
2
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
GM
Hoang, Thanh Trang
2467
-
GM
Muzychuk, Anna
2550
½-½
3.2
IM
Lazarne Vajda, Szidonia
2372
-
GM
Muzychuk, Mariya
2539
1-0
3.3
WGM
Papp, Petra
2336
-
GM
Zhukova, Natalia
2475
½-½
3.4
WGM
Gara, Ticia
2379
-
IM
Gaponenko, Inna
2416
0-1
Bo.
1
China (CHN)
Rtg
-
16
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
3½: ½
4.1
GM
Hou, Yifan
2658
-
WGM
Mamedjarova, Zeinab
2295
1-0
4.2
GM
Ju, Wenjun
2583
-
WGM
Mammadzada, Gunay
2361
1-0
4.3
GM
Zhao, Xue
2522
-
WGM
Mammadova, Gulnar
2304
½-½
4.4
WGM
Tan, Zhongyi
2475
-
WGM
Kazimova, Narmin
2302
1-0
Bo.
52
Turkmenistan (TKM)
Rtg
-
18
Israel (ISR)
Rtg
1½:2½
5.1
WGM
Geldiyeva, Mahri
2285
-
WIM
Shvayger, Yuliya
2408
0-1
5.2
WFM
Ovezdurdiyeva, Jemal
2031
-
WIM
Efroimski, Marsel
2322
0-1
5.3
WFM
Atabayeva, Gozel
2021
-
IM
Klinova, Masha
2290
½-½
5.4
WFM
Hallaeva, Bahar
2103
-
WIM
Gutmakher, Olga
2216
1-0
Bo.
11
Romania (ROU)
Rtg
-
19
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
1:3
6.1
IM
Peptan, Corina-Isabela
2394
-
IM
Pham, Le Thao Nguyen
2338
½-½
6.2
IM
Foisor, Cristina-Adela
2353
-
WGM
Hoang, Thi Bao Tram
2325
0-1
6.3
WGM
Cosma, Elena-Luminita
2331
-
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung
2316
0-1
6.4
WIM
Dragomirescu, Angela
2227
-
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Thanh An
2249
½-½
Bo.
10
Germany (GER)
Rtg
-
15
Mongolia (MGL)
Rtg
2:2
7.1
WGM
Michna, Marta
2383
-
IM
Nomin-Erdene, Davaademberel
2422
½-½
7.2
WGM
Levushkina, Elena
2342
-
WIM
Uuriintuya, Uurtsaikh
2228
1-0
7.3
WGM
Lubbe, Melanie
2324
-
WGM
Enkhtuul, Altan-Ulzii
2288
0-1
7.4
WIM
Fuchs, Judith
2287
-
WIM
Lkhamsuren, Uuganbayar
2147
½-½
Bo.
22
Uzbekistan (UZB)
Rtg
-
5
India (IND)
Rtg
1½:2½
8.1
WGM
Muminova, Nafisa
2324
-
GM
Harika, Dronavalli
2542
0-1
8.2
WIM
Tokhirjonova, Gulrukhbegim
2289
-
IM
Padmini, Rout
2408
½-½
8.3
WIM
Kurbonboeva, Sarvinoz
2223
-
WGM
Soumya, Swaminathan
2379
½-½
8.4
 
Nadirjanova, Nodira
2126
-
WIM
Pratyusha, Bodda
2287
½-½
Bo.
9
Bulgaria (BUL)
Rtg
-
45
Ecuador (ECU)
Rtg
2½:1½
9.1
GM
Stefanova, Antoaneta
2515
-
IM
Fierro Baquero, Martha L.
2369
1-0
9.2
IM
Videnova, Iva
2386
-
WGM
Heredia Serrano, Carla
2075
0-1
9.3
WGM
Nikolova, Adriana
2358
-
WIM
Moncayo Romero, Evelyn
2046
1-0
9.4
WIM
Raeva, Elitsa
2232
-
WFM
Bosch Garcia, Jacqueline
2011
½-½
Bo.
4
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
26
Argentina (ARG)
Rtg
3:1
10.1
GM
Dzagnidze, Nana
2522
-
IM
Lujan, Carolina
2378
½-½
10.2
IM
Javakhishvili, Lela
2486
-
WIM
Zuriel, Marisa
2272
½-½
10.3
GM
Khotenashvili, Bela
2463
-
WIM
Fernandez, Maria Florencia
2189
1-0
10.4
IM
Batsiashvili, Nino
2474
-
WIM
Martinez, Ayelen
2219
1-0
Bo.
29
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
-
57
Mexico (MEX)
Rtg
2:2
11.1
WGM
Reizniece-Ozola, Dana
2243
-
WIM
Real Pereyra, Diana Carime
2136
1-0
11.2
WGM
Berzina, Ilze
2241
-
WIM
Fuentes Godoy, Lilia Ivonne
2142
0-1
11.3
WGM
Erneste, Inguna
2178
-
WFM
Parkhurst Casas, Miriam
1993
½-½
11.4
 
Otikova, Elina
2051
-
WIM
Garcia Morales, Ivette Ale
2006
½-½
Bo.
27
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
-
40
Canada (CAN)
Rtg
3:1
12.1
WGM
Rapport, Jovana
2318
-
FM
Zhou, Qiyu
2367
1-0
12.2
WGM
Chelushkina, Irina
2221
-
WIM
Yuan, Yuanling
2205
0-1
12.3
WIM
Eric, Jovana
2161
-
 
Agbabishvili, Lali
2064
1-0
12.4
WIM
Drljevic, Ljilja
2207
-
WCM
Ouellet, Maili-Jade
1992
1-0

Olympiad schedule

Date Time Event, function
9 September 15:00 Round 7
10 September 15:00 Round 8
11 September 15:00 Round 9
12 September 15:00 Round 10
13 September 11:00/19:30 Round 11/Closing Ceremony
14 September All day Departure day

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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valu831 valu831 9/12/2016 12:01
Too bad USA cannot get any quality domestic players, USA born. Just wangling from outside already established GM.
jsaldea12 jsaldea12 9/11/2016 12:44
Congrats to GM So, your star is rising.
vladivaclav vladivaclav 9/11/2016 12:27
china, especially play by wei yi, big disappointment on this olympiad
jsaldea12 jsaldea12 9/11/2016 11:56
What is not in the limelight but quietly in the forerunners is the the legendary, ageless grand of grandmaster, Eugene Torre, Philippines,he has notched his win in 8th round, now has a total wins of 6, no loss, 2 draws. We, the Capiz Chess Club is behind you..
hserusk hserusk 9/11/2016 08:50
Horius,
What's happening? I will have to go ahead and sort of agree with you.
I don't quite see his red stapler. It'd be great if Nepo took it away and paid the price.
Thaenkssss.
ulyssesganesh ulyssesganesh 9/11/2016 07:19
great comeback by India .....go india....go towards the medal within your reach!
geraldsky geraldsky 9/11/2016 06:46
The U.S. should not be affected by the loss of Robson, then they will win for the rest of the rounds...
Malcom Malcom 9/11/2016 02:23
To the weird "groupies", My god can you not respect there is more important things in this world than your little self taking a picture with Wesley So!? Are you so self-absorbed that you can't wait 5 minutes until the broadcast is done....is the word respect not in the filippino dictionnary!?!? I find our top notch host handled it great; I would have booted their ugly rear ends out of the way! :-)
horius horius 9/10/2016 11:45
LOL Wesley So sounds exactly like Milton Waddams from Office Space
ChiliBean ChiliBean 9/10/2016 11:43
Thanks. I don't remember the last time both USA teams won the gold. ;) Maybe this is the year!
Denix Denix 9/10/2016 11:16
Nice wins by Wesley and Alexander!
Avenar Avenar 9/10/2016 09:49
@ChiliBean:
2004, Calvià, Spain: Silver
2008, Dresden, Germany: Bronze
ChiliBean ChiliBean 9/10/2016 09:09
I will be impressed with the USA women's team gets a medal. I don't remember the last time they did.
1