2016 Baku Rd4: Russia succumbs to Ukraine

by Albert Silver
9/5/2016 – Round four was the first true clash of the titans, as Russia squared off against Ukraine. The match was more than just a sports confrontation as the two nations have been bumping heads in no uncertain terms these last years. After an opening loss, Ukraine rallied back and took it 2.5-1.5 in a spectacular comeback. No less impressive was Hou Yifan getting trampled over-the-board by Dana Reizniece-Ozola, Latvia’s Minister of Finance! Here is the report with photos, videos, and GM commentary.

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2016 Baku Olympiad

All games start at 3 p.m. local time = 1 p.m. in Europe (CEST), one hour earlier in Britain, and 2 p.m. in Moscow. You can find the starting time at your location here.

Watch it live on Playchess!

Round four

The colorful figures in the Expo Zone show they know how to strike a pose (photo by David Llada)

What a dramatic round it was! Until now, we had mostly been trying to drum up the excitement based on some cool moves, the occasional minor upset (granted Georgia’s loss to Philipinnes was not ‘minor’), but really we were holding our breaths until the big boys began to bump horns. Today was that day, and my-oh-my was the wait worth it.

There is no point beating around the bush, it was all about top-seed Russia facing off against Ukraine. The reasons this was enough to hands rubbed in anticipation are manifold, and all worthy ones. The geopolitical tensions between the two nations recently are far beyond mere diplomatic spats, and what is more: the two countries are crazy about chess, with enormous national pride invested in the game, so you can be sure, the audience in their respective homes was huge.

Always cordial, always smiling... before the unsheathe their blades (photo by David Llada)

Russia’s stake is curiously a bit bigger since they have not won a gold medal in 14 years in spite of being the outright Elo favorites each and every time. For a country that boasts more grandmasters than any nation, a deeper culture and infrastructure around the game, it does strike one as slightly curious. Especially since the event does take place every two years, so it isn’t for lack of opportunities. In fact, with the absence of Armenia, one of the top rivals, and a debilitated Israel, this should be a golden chance, even if the US and China are obviously heavy-hitting contenders.

The match certainly started well for the Russians as Ian Nepomniachtchi drew first blood with a fairly painless win over Anton Korobov, but this was soon negated when Andrei Volotikin beat Alexander Grischuk on board four when the latter lost the thread of his game and went down in flames.

Caught napping, the Russian team went down (photo by David Llada)

This left two games: Pavel Eljanov who had some very small chances against Vladimir Kramnik but would require a small miracle to really break him down, and Ruslan Ponomariov against Evgeny Tomashevsky. In spite of being the lowest-rated of the four Russians playing, the decision to put him on board two, hoping to face Ponomariov must have seemed a clever one in view of the 7-3 score the Russian had against Ruslan (blitz games included).

Evgeny Tomashevksy - Ruslan Ponomariov (analyzed by GM Elshan Morodiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.05"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Tomashevsky, Evgeny"] [Black "Ponomariov, Ruslan"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E18"] [WhiteElo "2731"] [BlackElo "2709"] [Annotator "Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "116"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Ukraine"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "UKR"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] {Round four was under the spell of the Ukraine-Russia match! Two of the top guns in the Olympiad since the fall of the Soviet Union and the two countries in political conflict! That would be enough tension to win most of the attention of the fourth round at the Baku Chess Olympiad. In a 'black' day in this match, ex-FIDE world champion, Ruslan Ponomariov, delivered one of the two victories for the Ukrainian team to let his teammates edge Russia 2.5-1.5} 1. d4 {(0s)} Nf6 {(0s)} 2. c4 {(0s)} e6 {(0s)} 3. Nf3 {(0s)} b6 {(9s)} 4. g3 {(54s)} Bb7 {(17s) Ponomariov adopts this classical system in the QID over 4...Ba6} 5. Bg2 {(42s)} Be7 {(12s)} 6. O-O {(75s)} O-O {(17s)} 7. Nc3 {(76s)} (7. Re1 {is another common move in this opening.}) 7... Ne4 {(44s)} 8. Bd2 {(9s)} Bf6 {(80s)} (8... f5 { is considered the main line. Ponomariov goes for a less theoretical, yet more passive continuation.}) 9. Rc1 {(606s) Surprised by Pono's choice, Tomashevsky goes for the mainline after thinking for a while.} Nxd2 {(202s)} 10. Qxd2 {(35s)} d6 {(29s)} 11. d5 {(871s)} e5 {(78s)} 12. e4 {(112s) Here comes the typical position arising after Bf6. White has given up on his pair of bishops but he manages to have more space and Black's bishop pair is not doing much in this position. To sum it up in one sentence: Black does not have any weaknesses but he is passive and has less space.} Nd7 {(220s)} 13. h4 {(153s)} (13. b4 a5 14. a3 g6 15. h4 Bg7 16. Bh3 Nf6 {could have been an alternative continuation here. There are not so many games in this line in the database.}) 13... a5 {(282s) This stops White's play on the queenside but now White has enough time to shut down any Black activity on the kingside and plan a long-term campaign thanks to his space advantage.} 14. Bh3 {(98s)} Nc5 {(437s)} 15. Kg2 {(135s)} Bc8 {(282s)} 16. Bxc8 {(1037s)} Qxc8 {(71s)} 17. Qe2 {(124s) A quick evaluation: White has a small edge thanks to Black's passive bishop on f6. The case of White losing this game is almost unthinkable.} Be7 {(571s)} 18. Nd2 {(275s)} Nd7 {(1020s)} (18... f5 19. exf5 Qxf5 20. Nde4 {would only give away the beautiful e4 square to White's knights.}) (18... g6 19. h5 { and White is faster to mobalize his pieces on the h-file.}) 19. Rh1 {(599s) White prepares an assault on the kingside. Black's position is very unpleasant. He does not have any counterplay and White is gradually grinding his advantage with no risk.} Nf6 {(100s)} 20. Nf1 {(196s) This knight is going to land on e3. This is too typical to earn an exclamation mark!} h5 {(703s)} 21. Ne3 {(165s)} g6 {(8s)} 22. Rcg1 $1 {(319s) Now we know what Tomashevsky's long-term plan is. He is preparing a king-march to the queenside in order to keep his king safe before the final attack. This concept was first introduced by the 9th world chess champion Tigran Petrosian.} Kg7 {(169s)} 23. Kf1 {(166s)} Rh8 $1 { (33s) Ponomariov is ready to face g4.} 24. Ke1 {(108s)} Qd7 {(213s)} 25. Kd1 { (50s)} Kg8 {(240s)} 26. f3 {(144s)} Bf8 $1 {(103s) QID position has transformed into a KID position. Now Black's King's Indian bishop finds a nice spot: the bishop goes to g7 or h6 to cover his mighty king.} 27. g4 { (47s) Tomashevsky starts his attack.} Rh7 {(64s)} 28. Kc2 {(100s)} Be7 {(140s) } 29. Rg2 {(62 s)} (29. g5 Ne8 30. Kb1 Bf8 31. Rf1 Bg7 32. Nb5 Rh8 33. f4 { I wonder how Black is going to defend f7.} exf4 34. Rxf4 Be5 35. Rf3 Kg7 36. Rhf1 Rf8 37. Qf2 Kg8 38. Nc2 Ng7 39. Ncd4 Rae8 40. Nc6 Qg4 41. Qc2 $1 {Black seems to be completely out of any useful move.} Qd7 (41... Qxh4 42. Nxc7) 42. Qd3 Qc8 43. Nxe5 Rxe5 44. Nd4 a4 45. Nc6 Ree8 46. Rf4 Qd7 47. Qf3 $18) 29... Qd8 {(46s)} 30. Kb1 {(166s)} Kh8 {(104s)} 31. Nf1 {(226s)} (31. g5 {[#] should be considered a strong alternative.}) 31... Nd7 {(140s)} 32. Rgh2 { (20s)} Kg7 {( 141s)} 33. Rh3 $4 {(46s) I do not understand... Doesn't this just lose a pawn?!} hxg4 {(142s)} 34. fxg4 {(65s)} Rxh4 {(6s) Ponomariov grabs the pawn!} 35. Rxh4 {(98s)} Bxh4 {(4s)} 36. Qh2 {(37s)} Bg5 $1 {(24s) Ponomariov keeps his head cool, the bishop goes to f4 and covers everything including the f-file. Black is much better now.} 37. Qh7+ {(113s)} Kf8 {(50s)} 38. Nh2 {(34s)} Qf6 {(457s)} 39. Rf1 {(50s)} Bf4 {(171s)} 40. Nf3 { (0s)} Ke7 {(0s) Tomashevsky has managed to transform his position from much better to slightly better and five moves later he is totally lost!} 41. Rh1 {(617s)} Bg3 { (222s)} 42. Nd2 {(547s)} Qf4 {(296s)} 43. Qh3 {(484s)} Nf6 {(193s) Mercilessly, Pono grabs the second pawn. The game is practically over.} 44. Qg2 {(166s)} Qxg4 {(157s)} 45. Ne2 {(127s)} Bf4 {(66s)} 46. Nxf4 {(11s)} exf4 { (49s)} 47. Qf1 {(44s)} Nh5 {(61s)} 48. Qd3 {(32s)} Kf8 {(179s)} 49. a3 {(59s)} Re8 {(91s)} 50. Ka2 {(4s)} Kg7 {(34s)} 51. Nf3 {(18s)} Nf6 {(48s)} 52. Re1 { (43s)} Nd7 {(70s) The final phase: Black trades the knights and he will gradually push his extra pawns.} 53. Qc3+ {(71s)} Ne5 {(66s)} 54. Rf1 {(5s)} Qh3 {(157s)} 55. Qc1 {(14s)} Nxf3 {(102s)} 56. Qc3+ {(2s)} f6 {(51s)} 57. Rxf3 {(5s)} Qg4 {(4s)} 58. Qd3 {(111s)} Rh8 {(15s) Tomashevsky had enough. Ponomariov was well rewarded for his passive 'waiting' strategy. What can I say about Tomashevsky's blunder? Well, when the tension is high we can all make mistakes. After all, we are human!} 0-1

As soon as the Ukrainian won, Eljanov quit his attempts to keep the game against Kramnik going and quickly agreed to a draw. Their victory was secured. After the game, whether out of a psychological jab, or cold analysis, Ponomariov said he thought it a strange choice as he thought Tomashevsky was a poor pressure player. A wonderful result for the Ukrainians no doubt, but it bears remembering this was but the 4th round of eleven, and the entire tournament still lies ahead. Round five promises fireworks once more as they will take on China!

The American Steamroller was stymied by the Czech Stonewall (photo by Paul Truong)

The United States faced the Czech Republic, a strong team with David Navara on board one, but otherwise outclassed by the Americans, at least on paper. Paper was all it was though as Fabiano Caruana was placed on board one against Navara, and while this might seem normal in view of his higher rating, his overall score against the Czech is actually worse, compared to Nakamura’s significant positive tally. Hindsight is always 20/20 it is true, but as it were the result of the match was four draws and the US’s unblemished record was broken.

India faced a very strong Cuban lineup with players of nearly identical ability, and it was young GM Vidit Gujrathi, who recently won Lake Sevan, who continued his superb run. The Indian is 4.0/4 so far and has already faced three grandmasters. Fantastic. (photo by Paul Truong)

Speaking of sizzling form: the Azerbaijani team continues to stomp and trample as they defeated Romania 3-1 including a fourth win in four games by… you guessed it: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, crushing Lupulescu with black. In the fifth round they will face the very strong Indian team.

Maxime Vachier-Lagrave has been unable to shine so far, much like his Norwegian colleague in the Top 10, and has played three draw so far. (photo by David Llada)

The reigning gold medalists from the 2014 Olympiad in Tromso also had no trouble. China beat Italy with relative ease, thoroughly dominating affairs on all boards and finishing with 3-1. Wang Yue on board one defeated his third grandmaster in three games in his usual display of positional class. (photo by Paul Truong)

Wang Yue - Danyyl Dvirnyy (annotated by GM Elshan Moradiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.05"] [Round "4.17"] [White "Wang, Yue"] [Black "Dvirnyy, Danyyil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D11"] [WhiteElo "2737"] [BlackElo "2543"] [Annotator "Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "China"] [BlackTeam "Italy"] [WhiteTeamCountry "CHN"] [BlackTeamCountry "ITA"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. Nf3 {(0s) The Chinese have been like a machine in this event. In round four they dismantled the young and talented Italian team 3-1.} d5 {(0s)} 2. d4 {(0s)} Nf6 {(0s)} 3. c4 {(0s)} c6 {(0s)} 4. e3 {(47s)} Bg4 {(26s)} 5. h3 {(50s)} Bh5 {(7s) } (5... Bxf3 6. Qxf3 e6 {used to be considered the safest continuation but recent results in 2015 and 2016 favor White. That may have been the reason behind the Italian GM's opening choice or he may have considered other matters that are unknown to your commentator!}) 6. g4 {(33s)} Bg6 {(7s)} 7. Ne5 {(3s)} e6 {(95s)} 8. Nxg6 {(9s)} hxg6 {(6s)} 9. Bg2 {(7s) Wang Yue is a very classical player. I have always considered his positional understanding as one of the best of players of my generation. The way he handles Dvirnyy's opening choice is no exception to his style: "I get two bishops and I start grinding!"} Nbd7 { (102s)} 10. Qd3 {(84s)} g5 {(440s)} 11. Nc3 {(156s)} Bb4 {(149s)} 12. Bd2 { (82s)} Qe7 {( 1705s)} 13. a3 {(257s)} Bxc3 {(1081s)} 14. Bxc3 {(227s)} Nf8 { (141s)} 15. cxd5 {(1769s)} exd5 {( 99s) The position is closed and White needs to do something before his pair of bishops become useless.} 16. Qf5 { (362s)} Ne4 $6 {(839s) This move is not a blunder or even a positional mistake but this changes the game's character from a tough complicated battle into a technical calm position which is more in line with Wang Yue's strengths. In that sense, the Italian GM puts himself into an unfavorable situation by entering into his opponent's area of expertise.} 17. Bxe4 {(670s)} Qxe4 {(38s)} 18. Qxe4+ {(5s)} dxe4 {(4s)} 19. d5 {(21s)} cxd5 {(146s)} 20. Rd1 {(41s)} O-O-O $2 {(314s) But this almost throws away the game.} (20... Ne6 21. Rxd5 f6 {looks very drawish to me.}) 21. Bxg7 {(38s)} Rg8 {(6s)} 22. Bf6 {(366s)} Rd7 {(5s)} 23. f4 $1 { (313s) This is exactly what I was talking about Wang Yue's great understanding of technical positions.} exf3 {(99s)} (23... gxf4 24. exf4 Ne6 25. Kf2 b6 (25... Nxf4 26. Rc1+ {loses the knight!}) 26. Ke3 {with close to a decisive advantage}) 24. Rf1 {(105s)} ({I prefer} 24. O-O Nh7 25. Bd4 b6 26. Rxf3) 24... Ne6 {(223s)} 25. Rxf3 {(22s)} Kc7 {(280s)} 26. Rf5 {(245s)} Kc6 { (83s)} 27. Rc1+ {(176s)} Kb6 {(93s)} 28. Ke2 {(5s)} Rg6 {(100s)} 29. Rcf1 { ( 53s)} Rh6 {(53s)} 30. R1f3 {(42s)} Kc6 $2 {(5s) played so fast and what is worse: loses a pawn on the spot! I cannot say more other than blundering a pawn was a contagious epidemic in the fourth round of Baku Olympiad!} (30... Rg6 31. Be5 Nd8 {is very bad but not over!}) 31. Bxg5 {(88s)} Nxg5 {(135s)} 32. Rxg5 {(4s)} d4 {(41 s)} 33. e4 {(109s)} d3+ {(6s)} 34. Kd2 {(3s)} Re6 {(46s)} 35. e5 {(75s)} Rd5 {(44s) } 36. Rxf7 {(67s) An easy victory for Wang Yue. Dvirnyy had a draw in his pocket but he made way too many mistakes!} 1-0

If much was made of the upset by Ukraine over Russia, a similarly surprising result took place between 6th seed England against 11th seed Netherlands. It isn’t that the Dutch are somehow significant weaker than the English in any way, as they are not, but who could have predicted the slaughter that took place with the Dutch taking it by 3.5-0.5!

Genna Sosonko chatting with Nigel Short, who had been given a day off, and could not believe what he was seeing. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Benjamin Bok - Gawain Jones

 

In spite of the interest in watching the top players and top matches, what makes the Olympiad so special is the way it brings together players from all corners on the planet. Here is Hashim Darwish, who has scored 1.5/4 for Bahrain. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Rani Hamid is in traditional attire from Bangladesh (photo by E. Kublashvili)

And let's not forget the fans who also come such as these Bermuda supporters! (photo by M. Emelianova)

Meet Fiorina Berezovsky who just turned nine and plays for Monaco (photo by David Llada)

 

Fiorina Berezovsky, interviewed here by Susan Polgar, speaks five languages: English, German, French, Russian, and a bit of Ukrainian!

In the Women’s competition there were plenty of surprises, some big, some small, but none that overshadowed the jawdropping defeat of world no.1 Hou Yifan, rated 2658 (a low), to WGM Dana Reizniece-Ozola who came in over 400 Elo less at 2243 FIDE. It wasn’t simply that the Latvian won, since blunders happen to the best of us, but that it was not due to a simple blunder. No, the World Champion was quite simply smashed by the Latvian, whose CV does not describe her as “professional chess player” it reads (seriously) “Latvian Minister of Finance”. Absolutely incredible!

Hou Yifan probably could not believe what was happening (photo by E. Kublashvili)

Video highlights of round four by GM Daniel King

 

In the video, you will see notes on the Russian games, Magnus Carlsen, and Hou Yifan's defeat

WGM Dana Reizniece-Ozola has a curriculum that is even more jaw dropping than her win over Hou. See her Bio at her Wikipedia page. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Luckily for the Chinese, they still claimed the match by 2.5-1.5, but one thing is certain: the dreams of invulnerability on the top board were subject to the coldest of showers in round four.

The highest profile match in the Women again involved the Russians, this time against Hungary, and though they won, it must be said it was a close affair. While Pogonina won on board four, boards two and three were draws and top-board Alexandra Kosteniuk was in serious trouble against GM Thanh Trang Hoang (originally from Vietnam, but long based in Hungary). Eventually she managed to defend, and this allowed Russia to stay unbeaten.

The team from Kazakhstan started 31st in the ranks, but is tied for first with a perfect score so far. From left to right: Zhansaya Abdumalik, Gulmira Dauletova, Sholpan Zhylkaidarova, and Aisezym Mukhit. (photo by David Llada)

Second seed Ukraine defeated the French team by an impressive 3.5-0.5, though it should be noted that France is missing their top two players, GM Marie Sebag and IM Almira Skripchenko. IM Sophie Millet was given a day off, but it is doubtful that would have swung the balance of power.

India on the other hand, fifth seed and going strong, was unexpectedly held to a 2-2 draw by the Israeli team.

It is all in the family when it comes to Sweden. GM Juan Bellon is the captain of the Women's team, as well as spouse to GM Pia Cramling, playing on board one, and Anna Carmling Bellon, their daughter, who is playing on fourth board. (photo by Davida Llada)

 

Video impressions of round four by Vijay Kumar with an interview of Tania Sachdev (see 11:40)

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Round four games (with times per move)

Select games from the list below the board

Open section (top pairings)

Bo.
5
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
-
1
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
2½:1½
1.1
GM
Eljanov, Pavel
2739
-
GM
Kramnik, Vladimir
2808
½-½
1.2
GM
Ponomariov, Ruslan
2709
-
GM
Tomashevsky, Evgeny
2731
1-0
1.3
GM
Korobov, Anton
2675
-
GM
Nepomniachtchi, Ian
2740
0-1
1.4
GM
Volokitin, Andrei
2647
-
GM
Grischuk, Alexander
2754
1-0
Bo.
9
India (IND)
Rtg
-
15
Cuba (CUB)
Rtg
2½:1½
2.1
GM
Harikrishna, P.
2752
-
GM
Dominguez Perez, Leinier
2720
½-½
2.2
GM
Adhiban, B.
2671
-
GM
Bruzon Batista, Lazaro
2623
½-½
2.3
GM
Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi
2669
-
GM
Quesada Perez, Yuniesky
2636
1-0
2.4
GM
Sethuraman, S.P.
2640
-
GM
Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo
2581
½-½
Bo.
2
United States of America (USA)
Rtg
-
17
Czech Republic (CZE)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
GM
Caruana, Fabiano
2808
-
GM
Navara, David
2742
½-½
3.2
GM
Nakamura, Hikaru
2789
-
GM
Laznicka, Viktor
2651
½-½
3.3
GM
So, Wesley
2782
-
GM
Hracek, Zbynek
2591
½-½
3.4
GM
Shankland, Samuel L
2679
-
IM
Plat, Vojtech
2519
½-½
Bo.
30
Romania (ROU)
Rtg
-
4
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
1:3
4.1
GM
Lupulescu, Constantin
2618
-
GM
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
2761
0-1
4.2
IM
Deac, Bogdan-Daniel
2524
-
GM
Radjabov, Teimour
2722
½-½
4.3
GM
Marin, Mihail
2572
-
GM
Mamedov, Rauf
2666
½-½
4.4
GM
Jianu, Vlad-Cristian
2554
-
GM
Naiditsch, Arkadij
2696
0-1
Bo.
3
China (CHN)
Rtg
-
36
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
3:1
5.1
GM
Wang, Yue
2737
-
GM
Dvirnyy, Danyyil
2543
1-0
5.2
GM
Ding, Liren
2753
-
GM
Rombaldoni, Axel
2567
1-0
5.3
GM
Yu, Yangyi
2725
-
GM
Brunello, Sabino
2568
½-½
5.4
GM
Wei, Yi
2717
-
FM
Moroni, Luca Jr
2459
½-½
Bo.
6
England (ENG)
Rtg
-
11
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
½:3½
6.1
GM
Adams, Michael
2738
-
GM
Giri, Anish
2755
½-½
6.2
GM
Howell, David W L
2665
-
GM
L'Ami, Erwin
2611
0-1
6.3
GM
McShane, Luke J
2671
-
GM
Van Wely, Loek
2674
0-1
6.4
GM
Jones, Gawain C B
2635
-
GM
Bok, Benjamin
2592
0-1
Bo.
23
Belarus (BLR)
Rtg
-
21
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
2½:1½
7.1
GM
Zhigalko, Sergei
2652
-
GM
Shirov, Alexei
2673
1-0
7.2
GM
Kovalev, Vladislav
2599
-
GM
Kovalenko, Igor
2651
½-½
7.3
GM
Zhigalko, Andrey
2591
-
GM
Neiksans, Arturs
2628
½-½
7.4
GM
Stupak, Kirill
2561
-
IM
Meskovs, Nikita
2476
½-½
Bo.
24
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
-
29
Slovenia (SLO)
Rtg
2:2
8.1
GM
Ivanisevic, Ivan
2650
-
GM
Beliavsky, Alexander G
2602
½-½
8.2
GM
Markus, Robert
2662
-
GM
Lenic, Luka
2622
0-1
8.3
GM
Indjic, Aleksandar
2548
-
GM
Skoberne, Jure
2562
1-0
8.4
GM
Markovic, Miroslav
2459
-
GM
Sebenik, Matej
2526
½-½
Bo.
27
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
-
8
France (FRA)
Rtg
2:2
9.1
GM
Papaioannou, Ioannis
2631
-
GM
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime
2813
½-½
9.2
GM
Mastrovasilis, Dimitrios
2601
-
GM
Maze, Sebastien
2617
½-½
9.3
GM
Banikas, Hristos
2571
-
GM
Fressinet, Laurent
2664
½-½
9.4
GM
Mastrovasilis, Athanasios
2555
-
GM
Bauer, Christian
2623
½-½
Bo.
14
Spain (ESP)
Rtg
-
34
Peru (PER)
Rtg
3½:½
10.1
GM
Vallejo Pons, Francisco
2716
-
GM
Cordova, Emilio
2638
1-0
10.2
GM
Salgado Lopez, Ivan
2662
-
GM
Cori, Jorge
2609
1-0
10.3
GM
Anton Guijarro, David
2630
-
IM
Vera Siguenas, Deivy
2499
1-0
10.4
GM
Vazquez Igarza, Renier
2580
-
GM
Cruz, Cristhian
2519
½-½
Bo.
18
Croatia (CRO)
Rtg
-
57
Mongolia (MGL)
Rtg
1½:2½
11.1
GM
Saric, Ivan
2668
-
IM
Munkhgal, Gombosuren
2446
½-½
11.2
GM
Palac, Mladen
2623
-
GM
Gundavaa, Bayarsaikhan
2492
½-½
11.3
GM
Kozul, Zdenko
2622
-
GM
Batchuluun, Tsegmed
2513
0-1
11.4
GM
Brkic, Ante
2584
-
FM
Bilguun, Sumiya
2444
½-½
Bo.
37
Kazakhstan (KAZ)
Rtg
-
61
Estonia (EST)
Rtg
2:2
12.1
GM
Jumabayev, Rinat
2604
-
GM
Volodin, Aleksandr
2473
1-0
12.2
 
Utegaliyev, Azamat
2513
-
IM
Ladva, Ottomar
2501
½-½
12.3
GM
Kazhgaleyev, Murtas
2594
-
FM
Shishkov, Andrei
2368
0-1
12.4
GM
Kostenko, Petr
2476
-
FM
Jezov, Roman
2283
½-½
Bo.
20
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
22
Bulgaria (BUL)
Rtg
3:1
13.1
GM
Jobava, Baadur
2665
-
GM
Topalov, Veselin
2768
1-0
13.2
GM
Mchedlishvili, Mikheil
2609
-
GM
Nikolov, Momchil
2585
1-0
13.3
GM
Pantsulaia, Levan
2601
-
GM
Iotov, Valentin
2518
½-½
13.4
GM
Sanikidze, Tornike
2497
-
GM
Rusev, Krasimir
2548
½-½
Bo.
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
-
50
Montenegro (MNE)
Rtg
3:1
14.1
GM
Duda, Jan-Krzysztof
2675
-
GM
Djukic, Nikola
2534
1-0
14.2
GM
Bartel, Mateusz
2646
-
GM
Blagojevic, Dragisa
2482
½-½
14.3
GM
Piorun, Kacper
2681
-
IM
Draskovic, Luka
2448
1-0
14.4
GM
Swiercz, Dariusz
2639
-
IM
Kalezic, Blazo
2457
½-½
Bo.
19
Turkey (TUR)
Rtg
-
63
Scotland (SCO)
Rtg
4:0
15.1
GM
Solak, Dragan
2635
-
IM
Greet, Andrew N
2455
1-0
15.2
GM
Ipatov, Alexander
2652
-
GM
Shaw, John
2454
1-0
15.3
GM
Yilmaz, Mustafa
2616
-
GM
McNab, Colin A
2434
1-0
15.4
GM
Esen, Baris
2524
-
FM
Berry, Neil
2315
1-0
Bo.
69
Ireland (IRL)
Rtg
-
32
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
1:3
16.1
FM
Jessel, Stephen
2367
-
GM
Le, Quang Liem
2723
0-1
16.2
IM
Heidenfeld, Mark
2366
-
GM
Nguyen, Huynh Minh Huy
2435
0-1
16.3
FM
O`Donnell, Conor
2343
-
FM
Nguyen, Anh Khoi
2448
½-½
16.4
FM
Daly, Colm
2328
-
GM
Dao, Thien Hai
2486
½-½
Bo.
25
Canada (CAN)
Rtg
-
67
Indonesia (INA)
Rtg
4:0
17.1
GM
Bareev, Evgeny
2675
-
IM
Ali, Muhammad Lutfi
2411
1-0
17.2
GM
Kovalyov, Anton
2617
-
 
Taher, Yoseph Theolifus
2321
1-0
17.3
GM
Hansen, Eric
2582
-
IM
Sadikin The, Irwanto
2327
1-0
17.4
IM
Krnan, Tomas
2430
-
FM
Pasaribu, Ivan Maxmillian Putra
1860
1-0
Bo.
10
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
102
Nicaragua (NCA)
Rtg
4:0
18.1
GM
Rapport, Richard
2752
-
FM
Ampie, Mauro
2348
1-0
18.2
GM
Berkes, Ferenc
2640
-
FM
Pineda, Juan Jose
2175
1-0
18.3
GM
Balogh, Csaba
2614
-
FM
Alfaro, William
2188
1-0
18.4
IM
Gledura, Benjamin
2585
-
FM
Bravo, William
2194
1-0
Bo.
85
Luxembourg (LUX)
Rtg
-
60
Portugal (POR)
Rtg
2:2
19.1
IM
Wiedenkeller, Michael
2458
-
IM
Ferreira, Jorge Viterbo
2511
1-0
19.2
IM
Berend, Fred
2328
-
GM
Galego, Luis
2458
0-1
19.3
 
Linster, Philippe
2233
-
IM
Damaso, Rui
2444
1-0
19.4
 
Mertens, Marc
2181
-
GM
Fernandes, Antonio
2413
0-1

Women's section (top pairings)

Bo.
8
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
3
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
1½:2½
1.1
GM
Hoang, Thanh Trang
2467
-
GM
Kosteniuk, Alexandra
2538
½-½
1.2
IM
Lazarne Vajda, Szidonia
2372
-
GM
Gunina, Valentina
2520
½-½
1.3
WGM
Papp, Petra
2336
-
WGM
Goryachkina, Aleksandra
2475
½-½
1.4
IM
Gara, Anita
2355
-
WGM
Pogonina, Natalija
2484
0-1
Bo.
2
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
-
23
France (FRA)
Rtg
3½:½
2.1
GM
Muzychuk, Anna
2550
-
IM
Collas, Silvia
2301
1-0
2.2
GM
Muzychuk, Mariya
2539
-
WGM
Maisuradze, Nino
2256
1-0
2.3
GM
Zhukova, Natalia
2475
-
WIM
Congiu, Mathilde
2232
1-0
2.4
IM
Gaponenko, Inna
2416
-
WIM
Navrotescu, Andreea-Cristiana
2235
½-½
Bo.
5
India (IND)
Rtg
-
18
Israel (ISR)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
GM
Harika, Dronavalli
2542
-
WIM
Shvayger, Yuliya
2408
½-½
3.2
IM
Padmini, Rout
2408
-
WIM
Efroimski, Marsel
2322
0-1
3.3
IM
Tania, Sachdev
2402
-
IM
Klinova, Masha
2290
1-0
3.4
WGM
Soumya, Swaminathan
2379
-
WIM
Gutmakher, Olga
2216
½-½
Bo.
16
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
-
11
Romania (ROU)
Rtg
2:2
4.1
WGM
Mamedjarova, Zeinab
2295
-
IM
Peptan, Corina-Isabela
2394
1-0
4.2
WGM
Mammadzada, Gunay
2361
-
IM
Foisor, Cristina-Adela
2353
0-1
4.3
WGM
Mammadova, Gulnar
2304
-
WGM
Cosma, Elena-Luminita
2331
½-½
4.4
WGM
Kazimova, Narmin
2302
-
IM
Bulmaga, Irina
2395
½-½
Bo.
12
Lithuania (LTU)
Rtg
-
31
Kazakhstan (KAZ)
Rtg
1½:2½
5.1
IM
Daulyte, Deimante
2421
-
WGM
Abdumalik, Zhansaya
2389
1-0
5.2
WIM
Zaksaite, Salomeja
2298
-
WIM
Dauletova, Gulmira
2275
0-1
5.3
WFM
Batyte, Daiva
2189
-
WFM
Zhylkaidarova, Sholpan
2162
0-1
5.4
WFM
Domarkaite, Laima
2161
-
 
Mukhit, Aisezym
2065
½-½
Bo.
43
Sweden (SWE)
Rtg
-
27
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
1:3
6.1
GM
Cramling, Pia
2444
-
WGM
Rapport, Jovana
2318
1-0
6.2
WIM
Agrest, Inna
2222
-
WGM
Chelushkina, Irina
2221
0-1
6.3
 
Bengtsson, Jessica
2005
-
 
Velikic, Adela
2260
0-1
6.4
 
Cramling Bellon, Anna
1913
-
WIM
Eric, Jovana
2161
0-1
Bo.
29
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
-
1
China (CHN)
Rtg
1½:2½
7.1
WGM
Reizniece-Ozola, Dana
2243
-
GM
Hou, Yifan
2658
1-0
7.2
WGM
Rogule, Laura
2306
-
GM
Ju, Wenjun
2583
0-1
7.3
WGM
Berzina, Ilze
2241
-
WGM
Tan, Zhongyi
2475
½-½
7.4
 
Otikova, Elina
2051
-
IM
Guo, Qi
2417
0-1
Bo.
20
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
-
28
Azerbaijan 2 (AZE2)
Rtg
2½:1½
8.1
IM
Zimina, Olga
2389
-
WGM
Mamedjarova, Turkan
2304
1-0
8.2
FM
Brunello, Marina
2376
-
WGM
Abdulla, Khayala
2214
1-0
8.3
WFM
Di Benedetto, Desiree
2183
-
WIM
Khalafova, Narmin
2219
½-½
8.4
WFM
Santeramo, Alessia
2001
-
WGM
Umudova, Nargiz
2247
0-1
Bo.
19
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
-
14
Spain (ESP)
Rtg
2½:1½
9.1
IM
Pham, Le Thao Nguyen
2338
-
WGM
Calzetta Ruiz, Monica
2249
1-0
9.2
WGM
Hoang, Thi Bao Tram
2325
-
IM
Vega Gutierrez, Sabrina
2411
0-1
9.3
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung
2316
-
IM
Matnadze, Ana
2383
½-½
9.4
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Thanh An
2249
-
WIM
Aranaz Murillo, Amalia
2279
1-0
Bo.
10
Germany (GER)
Rtg
-
26
Argentina (ARG)
Rtg
3:1
10.1
IM
Paehtz, Elisabeth
2474
-
IM
Lujan, Carolina
2378
½-½
10.2
WGM
Michna, Marta
2383
-
WIM
Zuriel, Marisa
2272
1-0
10.3
WGM
Levushkina, Elena
2342
-
WIM
Fernandez, Maria Florencia
2189
½-½
10.4
WIM
Fuchs, Judith
2287
-
WIM
Carraro, Denise
2120
1-0
Bo.
54
Australia (AUS)
Rtg
-
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
0:4
11.1
WIM
Richards, Heather S
2199
-
GM
Socko, Monika
2437
0-1
11.2
WFM
Nguyen, Thu Giang
2119
-
WGM
Zawadzka, Jolanta
2429
0-1
11.3
WIM
Guo, Emma
2035
-
WGM
Kulon, Klaudia
2346
0-1
11.4
WIM
Jule, Alexandra
2000
-
WIM
Wozniak, Mariola
2246
0-1
Bo.
65
Jordan (JOR)
Rtg
-
36
Belarus (BLR)
Rtg
0:4
12.1
CM
Aseel, Odeh
1547
-
IM
Ziaziulkina, Nastassia
2382
0-1
12.2
WFM
Alattar, Ghayda M.
1964
-
FM
Stetsko, Lanita
2170
0-1
12.3
WFM
Boshra, Alshaeby
1983
-
WFM
Bogdan, Ekaterina
2120
0-1
12.4
WIM
Fuad Kamel Jamaliah, Natalie
2064
-
 
Revo, Tatiana
2087
0-1
Bo.
39
Switzerland (SUI)
Rtg
-
30
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
1½:2½
13.1
WGM
Mueller-Seps, Monika
2276
-
WGM
Tsolakidou, Stavroula
2355
½-½
13.2
WFM
Georgescu, Lena
2164
-
WIM
Pavlidou, Ekaterini
2140
0-1
13.3
WFM
De Seroux, Camille
2101
-
WFM
Avramidou, Anastasia
2273
½-½
13.4
WFM
Stoeri, Laura
2084
-
WGM
Kouvatsou, Maria
2085
½-½
Bo.
112
Indonesia (INA)
Rtg
-
13
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
½:3½
14.1
WIM
Sihite, Chelsie Monica Ignesias
2199
-
IM
Khademalsharieh, Sarasadat
2429
0-1
14.2
WFM
Faruq, Afifa Ayyun
1667
-
WGM
Pourkashiyan, Atousa
2335
0-1
14.3
 
Putri, Regita Desyari
1623
-
WGM
Hejazipour, Mitra
2314
½-½
14.4
 
Walukow, Theodora Paulina
0
-
 
Alavi, Homa
1997
0-1
Bo.
49
Bosnia & Herzegovina (BIH)
Rtg
-
6
United States of America (USA)
Rtg
1½:2½
15.1
WGM
Dimitrijevic, Aleksandra
2254
-
GM
Krush, Irina
2444
½-½
15.2
WFM
Dengler, Dijana
2047
-
IM
Paikidze, Nazi
2366
1-0
15.3
WFM
Jacimovic, Sara
1992
-
IM
Zatonskih, Anna
2449
0-1
15.4
 
Mahmutbegovic, Nadina
1908
-
WGM
Foisor, Sabina-Francesca
2279
0-1
Bo.
98
Sri Lanka (SRI)
Rtg
-
59
Bolivia (BOL)
Rtg
2:2
16.1
 
Tharushi, T H D Niklesha
1584
-
WIM
Monroy G., Nataly A.
2105
1-0
16.2
WFM
Wickramasinghe, Dilhara Ishini
1750
-
WIM
Cordero, Daniela
1954
0-1
16.3
WCM
Mendis, Dasuni Hansika
1699
-
WIM
Estrada, Lucia
1941
1-0
16.4
 
Saumy, Zainab
1688
-
 
Molina, Jessica
1883
0-1
Bo.
37
Slovakia (SVK)
Rtg
-
48
Norway (NOR)
Rtg
2:2
17.1
IM
Repkova, Eva
2332
-
WGM
Dolzhikova, Olga
2167
1-0
17.2
WIM
Maslikova, Veronika
2247
-
WIM
Hagesather, Ellen
2139
½-½
17.3
WFM
Vrbova, Niki
2186
-
 
Machlik, Edit
2056
½-½
17.4
WFM
Sucikova, Svetlana
2112
-
 
Machlik, Monika
2060
0-1
Bo.
33
Colombia (COL)
Rtg
-
24
Cuba (CUB)
Rtg
1½:2½
18.1
IM
Rodriguez Rueda, Paula Andrea
2326
-
WGM
Arribas Robaina, Maritza
2315
½-½
18.2
WGM
Franco Valencia, Beatriz Irene
2183
-
WGM
Marrero Lopez, Yaniet
2281
0-1
18.3
WIM
Rivera, Ingris
2201
-
WGM
Linares Napoles, Oleiny
2276
½-½
18.4
WIM
Castrillon Gomez, Melissa
2194
-
WIM
Hernandez Moya, Yuleisy
2264
½-½
Bo.
4
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
53
Egypt (EGY)
Rtg
4:0
19.1
GM
Dzagnidze, Nana
2522
-
WGM
Mona, Khaled
2175
1-0
19.2
IM
Javakhishvili, Lela
2486
-
WGM
Wafa, Shrook
2106
1-0
19.3
GM
Khotenashvili, Bela
2463
-
WIM
Sherif, Amina
2028
1-0
19.4
IM
Batsiashvili, Nino
2474
-
WIM
Elansary, Eman
1949
1-0

Olympiad schedule

Date Time Event, function
1 September 18:30/20:30 Arrival, Opening, Captains meeting
2 September 10:00/15:00 Arbiters meeting/Round 1
3 September 15:00 Round 2
4 September 15:00 Round 3
5 September 15:00 Round 4
6 September 15:00/22:00 Round 5/Bermuda Party
7 September   Day Off
8 September 15:00 Round 6
9 September 15:00 Round 7
10 September 15:00 Round 8
11 September 15:00 Round 9
12 September 15:00 Round 10
13 September 11:00/19:30 Round 11/Closing Ceremony
14 September All day Departure day

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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lajosarpad lajosarpad 9/6/2016 11:16
Congratulations for the Russian Women's team, they displayed their class, but I am proud that Hungary made sure they face tough resistance.
Pionki Pionki 9/6/2016 10:55
WGM Dana Reizniece-Ozola must be over the moon. Nothing compares to winning a chess game and to do it in style against the best player in the world is anyone's dream. I would retire after that!
X iLeon aka DMG X iLeon aka DMG 9/6/2016 07:35
I think it's distasteful that the article draws attention to the politics between Ukraine and Russia. Any of us with a modicum of interest in world affairs (which should be everyone really) knows the situation. So people who visit chessic websites do so for the chess! Lets keep it chessic and not deteriorate into the ugly world of politics and propaganda!
Bertman Bertman 9/6/2016 07:15
Giri has scored 3.5/4
ARK_ANGEL ARK_ANGEL 9/6/2016 06:42
It's funny. For GIRI what ever the tournament whether it's candidate, super tournament, league or Olympiad irrespective of team or individual results is always a draw. What a coincident. :D. He carries legacy of Draw Master title . I wish FIDE should invent a title like that. "DM". It should grant based on the draw count. :XD
sranj sranj 9/6/2016 05:16
Anish draws his game
geraldsky geraldsky 9/6/2016 03:07
Team tournaments are the most enjoyable in chess events, but most of the time there are blaming for those who lost.
1