2016 Baku Rd10: China to face Russia to decide Women's

by Albert Silver
9/13/2016 – The penultimate round saw few changes if any in the leaderboards. The USA played Georgia and won, with the only hiccup being Nakamura's loss to Mchedlishvili. Ukraine also defeated the Czech, while their Volokitin soars at a 2994 performance. Russia only drew India, though they still remain clear third. Remarkably, Canada is in 4th place on tiebreak. The Women's saw China barely overcome Poland, while Ukraine drew India. Russia won against Georgia and will face China for the gold. Large illustrated report with videos and GM analysis.

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2016 Baku Olympiad

All games start at 3 p.m. local time = 1 p.m. in Europe (CEST), one hour earlier in Britain, and 2 p.m. in Moscow. You can find the starting time at your location here.

Watch it live on Playchess!

Round ten

At this point of the competition, the leaders in the Open section are well-established, but that is not to say the podium is all spoken for. Accidents happen, as will be seen, but barring such mishaps, gold and silver will be determined by the USA and Ukraine.

The US team continues to pursue the dream of gold, a dream that was only last fulfilled in 1976 in Haifa, Israel, which was precisely the only Olympiad since 1952 that did not have the USSR, or numerous eastern countries participating. Having faced all its nearest rivals, with the same going for Ukraine, it is more a question of continuing to stamp their authority and avoiding any tragic upsets.

The opponent of the day was Georgia, and once more, eyes were riveted to the first board. If Caruana would naturally be considered the outright favorite under normal circumstances, this is without taking into consideration Baadur Jobava's fantastic performance that had been in excess of 3000 going into this round. That was the kind of form he had shown. (photo by David Llada)

There was no lack of interested players to come and watch. Russian GM Alexander Grischuk came to see whether the Georgian would continue his miracle run. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Here one can see both Carlsen and Nakamura following the game. In the end, Fabiano was more than up to the task, though neither made any headway, and a draw was agreed. (photo by David Llada)

Sam Shankland, brought back to board four, was one of the key winners in the round, defeating GM Sanikidze. In spite of close calls and escapes that would make Houdini proud, Shankland continues to be undefeated in the Olympiad with 5.5/7 and a 2742 performance. (photo by David Llada)

It wasn't all smooth sailing though, as Hikaru Nakamura, sporting a runny nose and nasty cough, was clearly the worse for shape, which cost him as he lost to GM Mchedlishvili. Luckily, Wesley So was still in red hot form and helped clinch it for the Americans. (photo by David Llada)

Ukraine's lineup might seem weakened by the absence of Vassily Ivanchuk, but other players have managed to shine so brightly that they still are in prime position for a gold. Board four's Andrei Voloktin is the brightest of these comets with a fantastic 7.5/8 and 2994 performance. Enjoy some of his handiwork below. (photo by David Llada)

Andrei Volokitin - Vlastimil Babula (Annotated by GM Elshan Moradiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.12"] [Round "10.8"] [White "Volokitin, Andrei"] [Black "Babula, Vlastimil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B45"] [WhiteElo "2647"] [BlackElo "2540"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "117"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "team-tourn"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Ukraine"] [BlackTeam "Czech Republic"] [WhiteTeamCountry "UKR"] [BlackTeamCountry "CZE"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] {Ukraine has had a great performance so far without Ivanchuk. Andrei Volokitin's score of 7.5/8 on board 4 (he is actually the team's alternate) has been their greatest asset for their great showing so far. In this match, he once more shows how valuable he has been to his team so far.} 1. e4 {(00:00)} c5 {(00:00)} 2. Nf3 { (00:00)} e6 {( 00:00)} 3. d4 {(00:00)} cxd4 {(00:00)} 4. Nxd4 {(00:00)} Nc6 { (00:15)} 5. Nc3 {(00:07)} d6 {(00:21) GM Babula transposes the game from Taimanov to Scheveningen. The setback here is that White has the alternative of castling on the queenside.} 6. Be3 {(06:00)} Nf6 {(02:01)} 7. Qd2 {(00:39)} Be7 {(00:58)} 8. f3 {(02:25)} O-O {(00:51)} 9. O-O-O {(00:05)} a6 {(00:59)} 10. g4 {(01:04)} Nd7 {(00:55) This is one of the oldest lines in the English attack.} 11. h4 {( 01:21)} Nxd4 {(00:48)} 12. Bxd4 {(01:45)} b5 {(00:52)} 13. g5 { (02:09)} Qc7 {(05:36)} 14. Kb1 {(37:15) players are following the most popular continuation.} b4 {( 04:57)} (14... Bb7 15. g6 b4 {leads to a complicated and probably well-probed position.} (15... hxg6 16. h5 {is almost equvalent to checkmate.})) 15. Na4 {(03:15)} Bb7 {(01:05) Now Bc6 is a threat. } 16. Qxb4 {(00:47) This is not new to Babula, and he played all this last year against well-prepared Dutch GM Robin Van Kampen.} (16. b3 {is another possibility. Volokitin himself was a victim of this move from black's side against Bologan.} d5 17. g6 fxg6 18. Bh3 e5 19. Bxd7 Qxd7 20. Bc5 d4 21. Nb6 Qc7 22. Bxe7 Qxb6 23. Bxf8 Rxf8 24. Qg5 Qe6 25. Rhf1 h6 26. Qd2 a5 27. f4 Bxe4 28. Qe2 Qc6 29. Rde1 Bf5 30. fxe5 Rc8 31. Rf2 Qc3 32. Rxf5 gxf5 33. e6 Re8 34. e7 Kh8 35. Qe5 d3 36. Qxc3 bxc3 37. cxd3 Kg8 38. Re5 g6 39. h5 Kf7 40. d4 Kf6 41. hxg6 f4 42. g7 Kxg7 43. d5 Kf6 44. d6 f3 45. d7 f2 46. dxe8=Q f1=Q+ 47. Kc2 Qf2+ 48. Kxc3 Qg3+ 49. Kd2 Qf2+ 50. Kd3 Qf3+ 51. Re3 Qd5+ 52. Kc2 Qc5+ 53. Kb1 Qf5+ 54. Kb2 Qf2+ 55. Ka3 Qxe3 56. Qf8+ Kg5 57. e8=Q {1-0 (57) Bologan,V (2663)-Volokitin,A (2572) Istanbul 2003}) 16... Bc6 {(04:54)} 17. Nc3 {(01:13)} Rfc8 {(05:01) Babula deviates first! He probably found something fishy in his game against Van Kampen and he was not interested in discovering what Volokitin has prepared for him in that line!} (17... Rfb8 18. Qc4 Ne5 19. Qe2 Bb5 20. Nxb5 axb5 21. c3 Nc4 22. b3 e5 23. Bg1 Qa5 24. Rd3 b4 25. Rd5 Na3+ 26. Ka1 Qc7 27. c4 Nb5 28. Rxb5 Rxb5 29. a4 d5 30. Kb1 dxc4 31. Qxc4 Qd8 32. Qxb5 Qd1+ 33. Kb2 Qd2+ 34. Kb1 Qd1+ 35. Kb2 Qd2+ 36. Kb1 Rc8 37. Bc4 Qd1+ 38. Kb2 Qd2+ 39. Kb1 Qd1+ 40. Kb2 Qd2+ 41. Kb1 {1/2-1/2 (41) Van Kampen,R (2626)-Babula,V (2545) Jerusalem 2015}) 18. Qc4 {(12:36)} Rab8 {(01:36)} 19. b3 {(11:07)} Ne5 {(17:24) } 20. Qe2 {(00:43) Black has sacrificed a pawn but now he has both b and c file open against White's king. White's attack is still not dangerous and for the moment it is Black who has the initiative.} Ba8 {(00:37)} 21. Qg2 $6 { (11:50) too optimisitc. This leaves White's queenside a bit vulnerable.} Qa5 { (17:29)} 22. Rh3 {(03:24)} Ng6 {(10:17)} (22... Rxc3 $4 {does not work due to.} 23. Bxc3 Qxc3 24. f4) (22... Nc6 23. Qd2 e5 24. Be3 Nb4 {would have given Black a strong attack and initiative. Please consider that d5 is a strong breakthrough too!} 25. g6 (25. Be2 $4 d5 $1 26. exd5 Bxd5 $19) 25... hxg6 26. h5 g5 {And Black's attack is more dangerous.}) 23. h5 $6 {( 03:06) Another risky move! Now White is in serious danger.} Nf4 {(00:43)} 24. Qd2 {(00:04)} Nxh3 $2 {(02:51)} (24... Bxg5 $1 25. Rg3 h6 {Looks very bad for White!}) 25. Nd5 $1 {(00:18) I guess Babula missed this.} Qxd2 {(02:18)} 26. Nxe7+ {(00:03)} Kf8 {(00:06)} 27. Rxd2 {(00:05)} Kxe7 {(03:27)} 28. Bxh3 {(00:10)} Rb5 $6 { (03:29) wrong plan, Black had to open up the kingside.} (28... Rg8 $5 29. Bf1 a5 30. Bd3 h6 $1) 29. Rg2 {(00:24)} g6 {(01:45)} 30. h6 {(01:25)} Bc6 {(05:49)} 31. c4 {(00:29) two inactive move and now White dominates the game and dark squares. Black's rook have a hard time finding an open file and the position is extremely unpleasant for Black.} Rb7 {(02:36)} 32. Rd2 {(00:08)} Rd7 { (00:57)} 33. Bf6+ {(00:49)} Ke8 {(00:04)} 34. Kb2 {(00:20) Engines give 0.6 for White but in my opinion the game is stratigically over.} Rb8 {(00:32)} 35. Bc3 {(01:37)} Ke7 {(00:49)} 36. Bf6+ {(00:29)} Ke8 {(00:02)} 37. Kc3 {(00:14)} a5 {(00:41)} 38. Bf1 {(00:12)} Kf8 {(02:13)} 39. Bh3 {(00:50)} Ke8 {(00:22)} 40. Bf1 {(00:00)} Kf8 {(00:00)} 41. Rd4 {(10:21)} Ke8 {(09:49)} 42. Bh3 { (03:21)} Kf8 {(05:13)} 43. Bg4 {(00:58) Volokitin is in no rush. He takes his time to psychologically break Babula by proving that he is the only one with a plan to improve his pieces.} Kg8 {(05:29)} 44. f4 {(03:08)} Re8 { (00:16)} 45. a3 {(01:47)} Kf8 {(02:13)} 46. b4 {(00:30)} axb4+ {(00:06)} 47. axb4 {(00:02) Finally an open file for Black's rook, the problem is that it is too late to utilize it to Black's benefit.} Rc8 {(00:45)} 48. Kb3 {(02:39)} Ke8 {(07:09)} 49. b5 {(01:14)} Bb7 {(00:32)} 50. Kb4 {(05:22)} Rdc7 {(02:54)} 51. Be2 {(00:05)} d5 $2 {(01:29) desparation but what else?} 52. exd5 {(01:53) } exd5 {(00:05)} 53. cxd5 {(00:22)} Rc1 {(03:58)} 54. d6 {(00:44)} Rb1+ { (00:39)} 55. Ka5 {(00:15)} Ra8+ {(00:39)} 56. Kb6 {(00:04)} Bc8 {(00:09)} 57. Bf3 {(00:53)} Ra6+ {(00:35)} 58. Kc7 {(00:31)} Rxb5 {(00:17)} 59. Re4+ { (00:37) and mate follows in few moves. Babula started well and due to Volokitin's risky move got the upper hand. Had he not missed Bxg5 he might even have obtained a winning position. After falling for the Nd5 tactic, Volokitin played accurately and Babula remained passive. Once can conclude that Volokitin won because he better adjusted himself to the changes that happened to the characteristics of the resulting position after Nd5.} 1-0

David Navara - Pavel Eljanov

Volokitin was not the only winner for Ukraine as Pavel Eljanov capped his victory over David Navara with this tactic. Black to play and win.

1...Qxe6!! 2. dxe6 Ne2+ 3. Kf1 Nxd4 4. exf7 hxg4 0-1

Daniel King's video report on Round 10

 

Russia had been just one point behind the leaders in third place, and had hopes of a last-minute steal. These hopes of gold were dashed in their encounter with previous leaders, India. The first bad news came with Sergey Karjakin's loss to Pentala Harikrishna on board one. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Salvation for the Russians came in the form of Vladimir Kramnik who once again played an exemplary game to defeat Baskaran Adhiban. It should be noted that should the Russian win in round eleven he will finish the month with his highest rating ever, currently 2812 FIDE. (photo by L. Afandiyeva)

England played the very strong Azerbaijani team, and scored an important win. It's true that a medal may be a mathematical impossibility (the permutations are frankly too many for your author to know for sure), but the English fighting spirit has been exemplary. Third board Gawain Jones has definitely been one of the flagholders, scoring well, and fearless play. In round ten he defeated Arkadij Naiditsch. (photo by M. Emelianova)

 

Fourth board Nigel Short also won a fine game against Eltaj Safarli (2688) with black and has helped his team with solid results. Here he discusses his game, the event, and some of the controversies he has experienced such as the requested body search during a game that he refused.

Naturally, not all arbiters are alike. Here is arbiter Reem Hany Ballan from Qatar. (photo by David Llada)

China, who came as the third seed and with high hopes of defending their historic gold in Tromso 2014, have suffered a nasty slump in the second half. In round ten they drew against Belarus. Ding Liren is probably lost in thought wondering how things got so out of hand. (photo by David Llada)

One of the intriguing encounters was between Norway and the on-the-rise Iranian team. Whatever black magic the Iranians had at their disposal, fizzled in this encounter as they were thumped 3.5-0.5. Only untitled Parham Maghsoodloo (2566) drew Jon Hammer and has already earned another GM norm. Two in fact as norms at the Olympiad are worth double. (photo by Paul Truong)

Magnus Carlsen - Ehsan Ghaem Maghami

Magnus is Magnus, and when you are World Champion you scoff at triple isolate pawns. The rest of us cower and whimper at the idea. White to play and win.

25. Rxf7+! Kxf7 26. Nd6+ Ke7 27. Nxc8+ Kd7 28. Nxa7 Ba4 29. Nd3 1-0

Latvia had a very tough time of it against Canada, and in spite of a win by top-board Alexei Shirov over Evgeny Bareev, they lost 3-1. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Canadian GM Eric Hansen (2582) has played in every single round so far, and scored 8.0/10 with a 2696 performance! He is only beat by his teammate Anton Kovalyov on board two who has an amazing 2865 performance. (photo by David Llada)

15-year-old IM Anton Smirnov from Australia completed his (double) GM norm today and the title, making him Australia's youngest grandmaster ever. A hearty congratulations. (photo by Pascal Simon)

Markus Ragger analyzes his win over Sebastien Mazé

 

Although this was recorded after round nine, and discusses a fine game from round eight, it is a fine game with great insights you should not miss. We apologize for the delay, but with so much material to edit, upload, and share, it has been a struggle in getting it all to our readers.

Alexandr Fier analyzes his win over Yannick Pelletier (Portuguese)

 

At the initiative of the Brazilian Chess Federation, and their new YouTube channel, the players of the Open and Women's team have been presenting a video commented game each day of the Olympiad. In round four, it was board one GM Alexandr Fier who analyzed his game against Yannick Pelletier. It is in Portuguese, but is a fine game, and the effort is to be praised.

It needs to be pointed out that well after these two last videos with Markus Ragger and Alexandr Fier had been selected for inclusion in the report, it was not without irony to discover that the last-round pairing was... Austria vs Brazil. You can guess who is on board one for both teams.

Women's Event

If the top spots in the Open competition seem spoken for, the Women's event has been a nailbiter throughout with no shortage of surprises. In the penultimate round it was somewhat of a shock to see the leaderboard read: China 1st, Poland 2nd. If there was a team that had flown under the radar, it was the Polish women, yet numbers and results don't lie, and all credit needs to be given to them.

Great credit must be given to their lower-board players who have scored heavily and consistently for their team. On board three is WGM Karina Szczepkowska-Horowska, rated 2409 FIDE, but with 6.5/8 has a 2547 performance. (photo by M. Emelianova)

Also of note are Klaudia Kulon on board four, and the alternate on board four: Mariola Wozniak (above) who has scored a 'mere' 5.0/5. (photo by E. E. Kublashvili)

In view of this, it is less surprising, and as a result, one of the big matches was China against Poland. This was a wild match that could easily have gone wrong for China, and threatened to end in a draw. Karina Szczepkowska-Horowska was completely winning in her a game against Zhao Xue, but the full point eluded her and the Chinese took the day.

 

Daniel King has a quick chat with Brazilian player Thauane Ferreira de Medeiros

Gold is not in the pocket just yet as China must now face Russia in a "winner takes all" match. China needs only a draw to secure gold, but if Russia scores an upset, China will be denied once again. Remarkably, if China wins gold, it will be Hou Yifan's very first team gold. (photo by David Llada)

 

Alejandro Ramirez has a quick chat with IM Dorsa Derakhshani

Photographer Lana Afandiyeva (photo by David Llada)

David Llada is the official photographer of the Baku Olympiad and instrumental in the many beautiful portraits seen in the reports throughout

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Round ten games (with times per move)

Select games from the list below the board

Open standings after ten rounds

Rk
SNo
Team
Team
Gms
+
=
-
 TB1   TB2 
1
2
USA
10
8
2
0
18
344,5
2
5
UKR
10
9
0
1
18
328,0
3
1
RUS
10
7
2
1
16
345,0
4
25
CAN
10
7
1
2
15
312,5
5
9
IND
10
7
1
2
15
291,0
6
12
NOR
10
7
1
2
15
277,5
7
29
SLO
10
6
3
1
15
273,5
8
6
ENG
10
7
1
2
15
269,0
9
34
PER
10
7
1
2
15
251,5
10
36
ITA
10
6
3
1
15
247,0
11
20
GEO
10
6
2
2
14
291,0
12
10
HUN
10
7
0
3
14
279,5
13
19
TUR
10
6
2
2
14
278,5
14
17
CZE
10
6
2
2
14
275,0
15
8
FRA
10
5
4
1
14
267,0

Click to view complete standings

Women's standings after ten rounds

Rk
SNo
Team
Team
Gms
 TB1   TB2 
1
1
CHN
10
8
2
0
18
316,5
2
3
RUS
10
7
2
1
16
317,0
3
7
POL
10
7
1
2
15
333,0
4
2
UKR
10
6
3
1
15
332,0
5
5
IND
10
6
3
1
15
290,5
6
8
HUN
10
6
3
1
15
281,5
7
6
USA
10
7
1
2
15
274,5
8
9
BUL
10
6
3
1
15
261,5
9
19
VIE
10
6
2
2
14
268,0
10
15
MGL
10
6
2
2
14
262,5
11
16
AZE
10
6
2
2
14
243,5
12
21
NED
10
7
0
3
14
237,0
13
66
MAS
10
6
2
2
14
235,0
14
18
ISR
10
6
2
2
14
226,5
15
35
AUT
10
6
2
2
14
216,0

Click to view complete standings

Open section (top pairings)

Bo.
20
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
2
United States(USA)
Rtg
1½:2½
1.1
GM
Jobava, Baadur
2665
-
GM
Caruana, Fabiano
2808
½-½
1.2
GM
Mchedlishvili, Mikheil
2609
-
GM
Nakamura, Hikaru
2789
1-0
1.3
GM
Pantsulaia, Levan
2601
-
GM
So, Wesley
2782
0-1
1.4
GM
Sanikidze, Tornike
2497
-
GM
Shankland, Samuel L
2679
0-1
Bo.
17
Czech Republic (CZE)
Rtg
-
5
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
1:3
2.1
GM
Navara, David
2742
-
GM
Eljanov, Pavel
2739
0-1
2.2
GM
Laznicka, Viktor
2651
-
GM
Ponomariov, Ruslan
2709
½-½
2.3
GM
Hracek, Zbynek
2591
-
GM
Kryvoruchko, Yuriy
2693
½-½
2.4
GM
Babula, Vlastimil
2540
-
GM
Volokitin, Andrei
2647
0-1
Bo.
9
India (IND)
Rtg
-
1
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
GM
Harikrishna, P.
2752
-
GM
Karjakin, Sergey
2769
1-0
3.2
GM
Adhiban, B.
2671
-
GM
Kramnik, Vladimir
2808
0-1
3.3
GM
Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi
2669
-
GM
Nepomniachtchi, Ian
2740
½-½
3.4
GM
Sethuraman, S.P.
2640
-
GM
Grischuk, Alexander
2754
½-½
Bo.
6
England (ENG)
Rtg
-
4
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
2½:1½
4.1
GM
Adams, Michael
2738
-
GM
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
2761
½-½
4.2
GM
Howell, David W L
2665
-
GM
Mamedov, Rauf
2666
0-1
4.3
GM
Jones, Gawain C B
2635
-
GM
Naiditsch, Arkadij
2696
1-0
4.4
GM
Short, Nigel D
2666
-
GM
Safarli, Eltaj
2688
1-0
Bo.
21
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
-
25
Canada (CAN)
Rtg
1:3
5.1
GM
Shirov, Alexei
2673
-
GM
Bareev, Evgeny
2675
1-0
5.2
GM
Kovalenko, Igor
2651
-
GM
Kovalyov, Anton
2617
0-1
5.3
GM
Neiksans, Arturs
2628
-
GM
Lesiege, Alexandre
2512
0-1
5.4
IM
Sveshnikov, Vladimir
2404
-
GM
Hansen, Eric
2582
0-1
Bo.
12
Norway (NOR)
Rtg
-
46
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
3½: ½
6.1
GM
Carlsen, Magnus
2857
-
GM
Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan
2566
1-0
6.2
GM
Hammer, Jon Ludvig
2651
-
 
Maghsoodloo, Parham
2566
½-½
6.3
GM
Tari, Aryan
2570
-
IM
Lorparizangeneh, Shahin
2478
1-0
6.4
GM
Urkedal, Frode
2537
-
 
Firouzja, Alireza
2463
1-0
Bo.
35
Moldova (MDA)
Rtg
-
36
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
1½:2½
7.1
GM
Bologan, Victor
2648
-
GM
Vocaturo, Daniele
2583
0-1
7.2
GM
Iordachescu, Viorel
2584
-
GM
Dvirnyy, Danyyil
2543
½-½
7.3
GM
Svetushkin, Dmitry
2543
-
GM
Brunello, Sabino
2568
1-0
7.4
IM
Hamitevici, Vladimir
2489
-
FM
Moroni, Luca Jr
2459
0-1
Bo.
29
Slovenia (SLO)
Rtg
-
32
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
3:1
8.1
GM
Beliavsky, Alexander G
2602
-
GM
Le, Quang Liem
2723
½-½
8.2
GM
Lenic, Luka
2622
-
GM
Nguyen, Ngoc Truong Son
2633
½-½
8.3
GM
Borisek, Jure
2558
-
GM
Nguyen, Huynh Minh Huy
2435
1-0
8.4
GM
Sebenik, Matej
2526
-
FM
Nguyen, Anh Khoi
2448
1-0
Bo.
14
Spain (ESP)
Rtg
-
27
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
2:2
9.1
GM
Vallejo Pons, Francisco
2716
-
GM
Papaioannou, Ioannis
2631
1-0
9.2
GM
Salgado Lopez, Ivan
2662
-
GM
Mastrovasilis, Dimitrios
2601
½-½
9.3
GM
Anton Guijarro, David
2630
-
GM
Banikas, Hristos
2571
½-½
9.4
GM
Vazquez Igarza, Renier
2580
-
GM
Halkias, Stelios
2565
0-1
Bo.
47
Chile (CHI)
Rtg
-
34
Peru (PER)
Rtg
1½:2½
10.1
GM
Morovic Fernandez, Ivan
2554
-
GM
Cordova, Emilio
2638
½-½
10.2
GM
Vasquez Schroeder, Rodrigo
2546
-
GM
Cori, Jorge
2609
0-1
10.3
IM
Henriquez Villagra, Cristobal
2508
-
IM
Vera Siguenas, Deivy
2499
½-½
10.4
FM
Perez Gormaz, Matias
2444
-
GM
Cruz, Cristhian
2519
½-½
Bo.
3
China (CHN)
Rtg
-
23
Belarus (BLR)
Rtg
2:2
11.1
GM
Wang, Yue
2737
-
GM
Kovalev, Vladislav
2599
½-½
11.2
GM
Ding, Liren
2753
-
GM
Zhigalko, Andrey
2591
½-½
11.3
GM
Yu, Yangyi
2725
-
GM
Stupak, Kirill
2561
1-0
11.4
GM
Li, Chao b
2746
-
GM
Aleksandrov, Aleksej
2547
0-1
Bo.
10
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
11
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
2½:1½
12.1
GM
Berkes, Ferenc
2640
-
GM
Giri, Anish
2755
½-½
12.2
GM
Almasi, Zoltan
2684
-
GM
L'Ami, Erwin
2611
½-½
12.3
GM
Balogh, Csaba
2614
-
GM
Van Wely, Loek
2674
1-0
12.4
IM
Gledura, Benjamin
2585
-
GM
Van Kampen, Robin
2640
½-½

Women's section (top pairings)

Bo.
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
-
1
China (CHN)
Rtg
1½:2½
1.1
GM
Socko, Monika
2437
-
GM
Hou, Yifan
2658
0-1
1.2
WGM
Zawadzka, Jolanta
2429
-
GM
Ju, Wenjun
2583
1-0
1.3
WGM
Szczepkowska-Horowska, Karina
2409
-
GM
Zhao, Xue
2522
½-½
1.4
WGM
Kulon, Klaudia
2346
-
WGM
Tan, Zhongyi
2475
0-1
Bo.
5
India (IND)
Rtg
-
2
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
2:2
2.1
GM
Harika, Dronavalli
2542
-
GM
Muzychuk, Anna
2550
½-½
2.2
IM
Padmini, Rout
2408
-
GM
Muzychuk, Mariya
2539
½-½
2.3
IM
Tania, Sachdev
2402
-
GM
Zhukova, Natalia
2475
1-0
2.4
WGM
Soumya, Swaminathan
2379
-
GM
Ushenina, Anna
2457
0-1
Bo.
3
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
-
4
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
2½:1½
3.1
GM
Kosteniuk, Alexandra
2538
-
GM
Dzagnidze, Nana
2522
1-0
3.2
GM
Gunina, Valentina
2520
-
IM
Javakhishvili, Lela
2486
1-0
3.3
WGM
Goryachkina, Aleksandra
2475
-
GM
Khotenashvili, Bela
2463
½-½
3.4
WGM
Girya, Olga
2452
-
IM
Batsiashvili, Nino
2474
0-1
Bo.
16
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
-
33
Colombia (COL)
Rtg
3:1
4.1
WGM
Mammadzada, Gunay
2361
-
IM
Rodriguez Rueda, Paula Andrea
2326
1-0
4.2
WGM
Mammadova, Gulnar
2304
-
WIM
Chirivi C, Jenny Astrid
2209
1-0
4.3
WFM
Hojjatova, Aydan
2339
-
WIM
Rivera, Ingris
2201
0-1
4.4
WGM
Kazimova, Narmin
2302
-
WIM
Castrillon Gomez, Melissa
2194
1-0
Bo.
15
Mongolia (MGL)
Rtg
-
6
United States (USA)
Rtg
2:2
5.1
IM
Nomin-Erdene, Davaademberel
2422
-
GM
Krush, Irina
2444
1-0
5.2
IM
Batchimeg, Tuvshintugs
2391
-
IM
Zatonskih, Anna
2449
½-½
5.3
WIM
Uuriintuya, Uurtsaikh
2228
-
WGM
Nemcova, Katerina
2365
0-1
5.4
WGM
Enkhtuul, Altan-Ulzii
2288
-
WGM
Foisor, Sabina-Francesca
2279
½-½
Bo.
23
France (FRA)
Rtg
-
8
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
1½:2½
6.1
IM
Milliet, Sophie
2362
-
GM
Hoang, Thanh Trang
2467
½-½
6.2
IM
Collas, Silvia
2301
-
IM
Lazarne Vajda, Szidonia
2372
½-½
6.3
WGM
Maisuradze, Nino
2256
-
WGM
Gara, Ticia
2379
½-½
6.4
WIM
Navrotescu, Andreea-Cristiana
2235
-
IM
Gara, Anita
2355
0-1
Bo.
9
Bulgaria (BUL)
Rtg
-
10
Germany (GER)
Rtg
2½:1½
7.1
GM
Stefanova, Antoaneta
2515
-
IM
Paehtz, Elisabeth
2474
½-½
7.2
IM
Videnova, Iva
2386
-
WGM
Michna, Marta
2383
1-0
7.3
WGM
Nikolova, Adriana
2358
-
WGM
Levushkina, Elena
2342
0-1
7.4
WGM
Voiska, Margarita
2290
-
WIM
Fuchs, Judith
2287
1-0
Bo.
12
Lithuania (LTU)
Rtg
-
18
Israel (ISR)
Rtg
2:2
8.1
GM
Cmilyte, Viktorija
2536
-
WIM
Shvayger, Yuliya
2408
1-0
8.2
IM
Daulyte, Deimante
2421
-
WIM
Efroimski, Marsel
2322
½-½
8.3
WIM
Zaksaite, Salomeja
2298
-
WIM
Gutmakher, Olga
2216
0-1
8.4
WFM
Batyte, Daiva
2189
-
 
Lahav, Michal
2054
½-½
Bo.
35
Austria (AUT)
Rtg
-
29
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
2½:1½
9.1
WGM
Theissl Pokorna, Regina
2331
-
WGM
Reizniece-Ozola, Dana
2243
1-0
9.2
WIM
Newrkla, Katharina
2214
-
WGM
Rogule, Laura
2306
½-½
9.3
WFM
Exler, Veronika
2220
-
WGM
Berzina, Ilze
2241
½-½
9.4
WFM
Hapala, Elisabeth
2021
-
WGM
Erneste, Inguna
2178
½-½
Bo.
26
Argentina (ARG)
Rtg
-
13
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
2:2
10.1
IM
Lujan, Carolina
2378
-
IM
Khademalsharieh, Sarasadat
2429
½-½
10.2
WIM
Zuriel, Marisa
2272
-
WGM
Pourkashiyan, Atousa
2335
½-½
10.3
WIM
Fernandez, Maria Florencia
2189
-
WGM
Hejazipour, Mitra
2314
1-0
10.4
WIM
Martinez, Ayelen
2219
-
WIM
Hakimifard, Ghazal
2308
0-1
Bo.
56
Estonia (EST)
Rtg
-
19
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
1:3
11.1
WIM
Narva, Mai
2238
-
IM
Pham, Le Thao Nguyen
2338
0-1
11.2
WIM
Tsiganova, Monika
2095
-
WGM
Hoang, Thi Bao Tram
2325
½-½
11.3
 
Olde, Margareth
2003
-
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung
2316
0-1
11.4
WCM
Narva, Triin
2023
-
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Thanh An
2249
½-½
Bo.
21
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
-
22
Uzbekistan (UZB)
Rtg
2½:1½
12.1
GM
Peng, Zhaoqin
2368
-
WGM
Muminova, Nafisa
2324
1-0
12.2
WGM
Haast, Anne
2306
-
WIM
Gevorgyan, Irina
2324
½-½
12.3
IM
Lanchava, Tea
2258
-
WIM
Kurbonboeva, Sarvinoz
2223
½-½
12.4
FM
Kazarian, Anna-Maja
2231
-
 
Nadirjanova, Nodira
2126
½-½

Olympiad schedule

Date Time Event, function
11 September 15:00 Round 9
12 September 15:00 Round 10
13 September 11:00/19:30 Round 11/Closing Ceremony
14 September All day Departure day

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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fightingchess fightingchess 9/13/2016 10:50
@kevin Place So on board 3 and he will make the difference.
Amat0r Amat0r 9/13/2016 10:01
We need more "Mr. Sinquefield"s. Did you see, how pathetic the prizes are in US chess tournaments. It is often less than $100. Less than 1 night room in a hotel !!!
Lack of sponsors is very bad for chess, US and worldwide.
KevinC KevinC 9/13/2016 08:05
@michaelriber, You are a moron. Only ONE player was not a U.S. native, and that was So.
michaelriber michaelriber 9/13/2016 02:06
So it looks like you can actually buy yourself a gold medal. Congratulations, Mr. Sinquefield...
KevinC KevinC 9/13/2016 01:23
@sivakumar R, Caruana was born in the "nation of immigrants". He was a citizen at birth, as was Nakamura, although he was born in Japan to an American mother.
sivakumar R sivakumar R 9/13/2016 12:55
@ fightingchess - the answer to your question is very simple - Anand does not want to!

On many occasions press reporters have asked this to Anand who has consistently replied that the format of the game does not suit him - although everyone knows that he is versatile in all formats of the game. Reading between the lines, Anand is not "patriotic enough" to play for his country and instead prefers to play for records and recognition.

Of course, Anand is much better than Caruana or Wesley So who switched their nationalities presuming better career prospects in the "nation of immigrants"
fightingchess fightingchess 9/13/2016 10:36
why does anand refuse to participate in olympiads? somebody better ask him or his teammates.
Bertman Bertman 9/13/2016 05:55
@Malcolm

That's not quite accurate. Rd8 report has photo and comments on Kovalyov, as well as a video of Eric Hansen.
geraldsky geraldsky 9/13/2016 05:20
If the scoring system is the total actual scores (game points) , The Canadian team also lead with 29 points after 10 rounds!
Malcom Malcom 9/13/2016 04:36
Canad's performance deserves much more coverage! It has been simply remarkable, and had the very talented GM Eric Hansen seen the winning move just before the time control against the powerful Ukranians no less, Canada would be in second! Let's not forget this! The second board for Canada, has been performing incredibly and yet nothing has been said about this. So sorry he is not Indian and therefore can't sell more subscriptions over there but... okay India is special, yippi yay; let's talk a bit more about other nations overachieving big time!
pojose pojose 9/13/2016 02:59
Isn't only Anand missing here from top 10? Even as Indian I don't understand why he worries about ratings drop in Olympiads even now. With him India could have easily be in top 3 and with proper play from his side he could make sure his ratings wont drop.
I don't doubt a second his contributions to India chess, but I really doubt it in Olympiads where countries compete rather than individuals.
Chessspawnvt Chessspawnvt 9/13/2016 12:27
Interesting interview here with Nigel Short today.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldAYecXObPA
Truffaut Truffaut 9/12/2016 11:49
@ stephen brady

"Where can I find the standings for the individual board medals?"

http://chess-results.com/tnr232875.aspx?lan=1&art=73&flag=30&wi=821
stephen brady stephen brady 9/12/2016 09:41
Also, it looks like the USA and Ukraine are assured of medaling, since they are 3 points clear of the 4th place teams. Unless there's a major upset, it will be USA gold, Ukraine silver, and Russia a disappointing bronze.

Where can I find the standings for the individual board medals?
KevinC KevinC 9/12/2016 09:21
So it seems like all the US has to do to take its first gold since 1976 is to beat Canada.
ChiliBean ChiliBean 9/12/2016 09:16
U.S. women's team was reaching for gold then to what looks like not even getting a medal. :( Naka's loss with white's pieces against someone about 200 elo lower than him was surprising too but the men looking good for the gold medal. We'll see in the final round.
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