WYCC 2015 final: India! India! India!

by Albert Silver
11/7/2015 – What an amazing final result for the ever-evolving chess nation. It took not only five gold medals out of twelve, but also eleven in all. No other nation managed more than one gold. (Ed: Vishy, check the rear-view mirror, they are coming after you.) The final two rounds were full of drama as favorites fell, and new champions took gold. Final report with glorious pictures and results.

There can be no hyperbole in stating that Team India quite simply steamrolled the 2015 World Youth championship. With five gold medals, when no other nation managed more than one, three silver and three bronze, the eleven medal total was nearly triple the next two most successful medal winning nations: the USA and Russia, both with four (though no gold).

It wasn't about throwing vast numbers of young competitors either, since although India certainly had no fewer than 50 representatives, the United States had 129, Russia had 70, and even Canada had 56. China had 46 players, but left with only one medal.

Enjoy these final images by ChessBase correspondent Reint Dykema, and the stories accompanying the results.

Of all the snacks and goodies available, the Greek Frozen Yogurt was easily one of the
most popular

Chess dad and photographer Reint Dykema with his two sons Dirkho and Joshua, who played
under the South African flag

Enjoying a last swim in Porto Carras, Greece

A final sunset

All the female champions gather for a giant collective photo. A hearty congratulations to all.

Final standings

Untitled Iranian Masoud Mosadeghpour (2420) showed that the rise of Iranian chess is real,
notably in the males now, since the women had already made their mark more than once. After
Iranian Pouya Idani's surprise win in the 2013 World Youth Boys Under-18, Masoud is now the
nation's second gold just two years later. After a crushing 8.5/9 start, two draws secured gold.

The Boys Under-18 champions

Kirill Alekseenko, silver in the Boys Under-18, Andrey Esipenko, the silver in the Boys Under-14,
and Daniil Yuffa, bronze in the Boys under-18

World Youth Ch 2015 - Open under 18
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1     Mosadeghpour Masoud IRI 2420 9.5 0.0
2   GM Alekseenko Kirill RUS 2539 8.5 0.5
3   IM Yuffa Daniil RUS 2485 8.5 0.5
4   IM Sardana Rishi AUS 2385 8.0 0.0
5   IM Tan Justin AUS 2445 8.0 0.0

The final standings of the Boys Under-16 was certainly one the least expected of podiums.
German Roven Vogel (center) had been a contender in the last rounds, but with so many in
similar positions, it was hard to point him out as a probable Gold. In the end, he was Germany's
only medal, but gold is gold! Taking silver was Italy's... Luca Moroni (left)! Unexpected because
the pre-event favorite was his compatriot IM Francesco Rambaldi, with nearly 100 Elo more.

Throughout most of the event, Egyptian FM Adham Fawzy had led, but a collapse at the end
with three losses left him in 18th. A pity, but there can be no doubt a bright future awaits him.

World Youth Ch 2015 - Open under 16
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1     Vogel Roven GER 2417 9.0 0.0
2   FM Moroni Luca Jr ITA 2460 8.5 0.0
3   FM Martirosyan Haik M. ARM 2366 8.5 0.0
4   IM Kantor Gergely HUN 2403 8.5 0.0
5   IM Rambaldi Francesco ITA 2547 8.0 0.0

Untitled and ranked only 12th, Uzbek Shamsiddin Vokhidov was in the top from the very
beginning. As of round nine it was between him and FM Andrey Esipenko, but his tiebreak
won out in the end, and it was gold for the young man.

Iranian M.Amin Tabatabaei was the big favorite with a massive 2488 rating, but two losses
in the second half took the wind out of his sails and he finished in a disappointing 12th

It wasn't all bad news for Iran though, as their second big gun in the Boys Under-14, Aryan
Gholami (2400 FIDE) squeezed past his many rivals and took bronze, a great result

Russian FM Andrey Esipenko was also a dominant name throughout, and was only edged
out on tiebreak at the very end. His silver medal was nevertheless the fruit of a 2500+ TPR.

Team Iran

World Youth Ch 2015 - Open under 14
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1     Vokhidov Shamsiddin UZB 2336 9.0 0.5
2   FM Esipenko Andrey RUS 2384 9.0 0.5
3   FM Gholami Aryan IRI 2400 8.5 0.0
4   FM Gazik Viktor SVK 2431 8.5 0.0
5   FM Fakhrutdinov Timur RUS 2305 8.0 0.0

The Boys Under-12 had an exceptionally strong field and an equally unexpected podium.

The overwhelming top-seed was FM Nodribek Abdusattorov (2432). The prodigy from Uzebkhistan
had missed out on the gold in 2014, when he had also been the top seed, and this time seemed
hell bent on making sure history would not repeat itself. He was going fine until round nine, when
he lost to eventual silver winner Nihal Sarin (2096), which left him in fourth.

The second-seed was American FM Awonder Lliang (2365), gold winner in 2013, and hoping
to achieve great things, but round one already showed things were amiss when he drew
Liu Mingyang (1781). Two losses during the competition relegated him to a disappointing 5th.

It was his compatriot David Peng (2231) who brought home the bacon
for Team USA, finishing third after a crucial last round game against...

... Iranian Alireza Firouzja, the third seed with a very impressive 2364 FIDE,
who was one of the leaders after round nine. Unfortunately, a draw in round
ten, and a loss to Peng (in game above) in the last round meant a 6th place.

German fans were certainly worked up by articles touting him as the best thing since sliced
Lasker, but prodigy Vincent Keymer never seemed to really recover from the loss on time in
round five. Another very unfortunate loss, also on time, to Awonder in the final round sealed
his fate to 17th place. Asked what happened, he explained he was thinking intensely about
the position and forgot the clock. A costly lesson, but one he will certainly learn from.

Enough with the should've beens and could've beens, who won? Azeri CM Muradli Mahammad
was the gold medal of 2015, scoring very heavily with only one loss to the top-seed in round
seven. More important was not the loss, but how he reacted to the setback: a draw in round
eight, and three straight wins to the end were good for gold.

Tied for first with 9.0/11, is the quite remarkably talented player from India, Nihal Sarin (2096).
The Indian player was already gold in the Boys Under-10 in 2014, ahead of Abdusattorov. If he
put in 100% of his energy, who knows what he might achieve, since all this is achieved in spite
of his difficulty in staying seated.

In the last rounds to his silver medal, Nihal Sarin defeated successively the top two seeds
of his category: Awonder Lliang (2365) in round seven, and FM Nodribek Abdusattorov (2432)
in round eight. The photo above was taken during his round seven win over Awonder!

World Youth Ch 2015 - Open under 12
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   CM Muradli Mahammad AZE 2121 9.0 0.0
2   CM Nihal Sarin IND 2096 9.0 0.0
3   CM Peng David T USA 2231 9.0 0.0
4   FM Abdusattorov Nodirbek UZB 2432 8.5 0.0
5   FM Liang Awonder USA 2365 8.5 0.0

This was Praggnanandhaa's second gold medal. He was also the
gold medalist in the Boys Under-8 in 2013 with a perfect 11.0/11!

Ilya Makoveev from Russia came in second with 9.0/11, earning 68 Elo in the process. In 2014
he had eaarned gold in the Boys Under-8.

Justin Wang from the US was a strong competitor from end to end,
but a loss in round nine threatened to leave him off the podium. His
win in the last round (below) was what gave him the bronze.

Justin Wang - Stefan Tadic

How did White finish off his opponent? White to play and win.

World Youth Ch 2015 - Open under 10
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   FM Praggnanandhaa R IND 2077 9.0 0.5
2     Makoveev Ilya RUS 1982 9.0 0.5
3     Wang Justin USA 2046 8.5 0.0
4   CM Sadhwani Raunak IND 1981 8.5 0.0
5   CM Suleymanli Aydin AZE 1910 8.5 0.0

The winners of the Boys Under-8

World Youth Ch 2015 - Open under 08
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1     Bharath Subramaniyam H IND 1602 9.5 0.0
2   CM Dev Shah IND 1521 9.0 0.0
3     Fiszer Bartosz POL 1443 8.5 0.0
4     Murgescu Adi USA 0 8.5 0.0
5   CM Sindarov Islombek UZB 1567 8.0 0.0

Ranked 32nd with an incredibly modest 2019 rating, Mahalakshmi from India was without
a doubt the greatest Cinderella story in the World Youth in Greece. Ahead of players rated
nearly 350 Elo more, she crushed the field with a 9.0/10 start, effectively winning the Girls
Under-18 a round in advance. Needless to say, her 2399 performance will garner her 210 Elo.

Taking silver was India's V Varshini, who started a mere 23rd, but also
took sole second with 8.5/11

The only crack in the Indian hegemony was Tijana Blagojevic from
Montenegro who took bronze

World Youth Ch 2015 - Girls under 18
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   WFM Mahalakshmi M IND 2019 9.0 0.0
2   WFM Varshini V IND 2105 8.5 0.0
3   WIM Blagojevic Tijana MNE 2315 8.0 0.0
4     Uuriintuya Uurtsaikh MGL 2237 8.0 0.0
5     Heinemann Josefine GER 2253 8.0 0.0

Greece's brightest star in the World Youth, Stavrous Tsolakidou once
more showed her stellar fighting spirit by winning the Girls Under-16
after a fairly lukewarm start. She finished with five straight wins, for
gold in 2015, after winning silver in the Girls Under-16 in 2014, and
gold again in the Girls Under-14 in 2013. She does her nation proud.

Taking silver was Veronika Gazikova from Slovakia, and Agata Bykovtsev from the US with
bronze. Of the tales of could've beens was Germany's Fiona Sieber who was a leader going
into the last round, but lost to Gazikova.

World Youth Ch 2015 - Girls under 16
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   WIM Tsolakidou Stavroula GRE 2279 9.0 0.0
2   WFM Gazikova Veronika SVK 2190 8.5 0.0
3   WIM Bykovtsev Agata USA 2117 8.0 0.0
4   WFM Sieber Fiona GER 2180 8.0 0.0
5   WFM Kiolbasa Oliwia POL 2182 8.0 0.0

One could argue that as the overwhelming top-seed, R Vaishali was 'expected'
to win, but the truth of the matter is that out of the 12 different categories
she was only one of two top seeds to have succeeded in converting that
favoritism into a gold medal, leading from start to finish

Taking silver was Alicja Sliwicka from Poland, and in bronze was Agrawal
Vantika, also from India.

World Youth Ch 2015 - Girls under 14
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   WFM Vaishali R IND 2314 9.5 0.0
2   WFM Sliwicka Alicja POL 2129 8.5 0.0
3     Vantika Agrawal IND 2039 8.0 0.0
4   WFM Obolentseva Alexandra RUS 2084 8.0 0.0
5   WFM Shuvalova Polina RUS 2171 8.0 0.0

Top seed Nurgyul Salimova was the second top-rated player in her respective category to
succeed in winning gold. American Carissa Yip, ranked third, was silver, while Saina Salonika
from India took bronze.

The prize ceremony was a festival of photos

World Youth Ch 2015 - Girls under 12
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   WFM Salimova Nurgyul BUL 2144 9.5 1.0
2     Yip Carissa USA 2007 9.5 0.0
3   WCM Salonika Saina IND 1858 8.5 0.0
4   WCM Duran Esma Doga TUR 1876 8.0 0.0
5   WFM Tan Huynh Thanh Truc VIE 1676 8.0 0.0

The Girls Under-10 was a big success for India, with Ravi Rakshitta taking gold, and Deshmukh
Divya taking bronze. Yuxin Song, who took silver, was China's only medal

World Youth Ch 2015 - Girls under 10
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1     Rakshitta Ravi IND 1516 9.0 1.0
2     Song Yuxin CHN 1700 9.0 0.0
3   WFM Divya Deshmukh IND 1772 8.5 0.0
4   WCM Mungunzul Bat-Erdene MGL 1731 8.0 0.0
5   WCM Can Isil TUR 1795 8.0 0.0

The champions of the Girls Under-8

World Youth Ch 2015 - Girls under 08
Rk
 
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
TB
1   WCM Nguyen Le Cam Hien VIE 1299 9.0 0.0
2     Gaal Zsoka HUN 1534 9.0 0.0
3     Ivanova Dilyana BUL 1369 8.5 1.0
4     Wei Yaqing CHN 1478 8.5 0.0
5     Savitha Shri B IND 1294 8.0 1.0

India's players and coaches gather for a picture. It was a colossal success for the nation. Stay
tuned for an in-depth overview by Sagar Shah.

Final medal ranking

Rk
FED
gold
silver
bronze
Total
1
IND
5
3
3
11
2
IRI
1
0
1
2
 
BUL
1
0
1
2
4
AZE
1
0
0
1
 
GER
1
0
0
1
 
GRE
1
0
0
1
 
UZB
1
0
0
1
 
VIE
1
0
0
1
9
RUS
0
3
1
4
10
USA
0
1
3
4
11
POL
0
1
1
2
12
SVK
0
1
0
1
 
HUN
0
1
0
1
 
CHN
0
1
0
1
 
ITA
0
1
0
1
16
MNE
0
0
1
1
 
ARM
0
0
1
1

Solution: 1.Bd6! Qc8 (1...Qxd6 2.c7) 2.c7 Nf6 3.Ba6! 1-0

All photos by Reint Dykema

About the photographer

Reint Dykema is a passionate chess dad. Both his two sons Dirkho and Joshua compete this year in the World Youth championships.

This is the third World Youth that Dykema has the opportunity to take photos and work closely with ChessBase.

In last year's World Youth championship in Durban, Dykema was the official photographer.

Over weekends he is also a wedding photographer when he is not taking photos in the local tournaments in South Africa.


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 13 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
Feedback and mail to our news service Please use this account if you want to contribute to or comment on our news page service



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The_Tenant The_Tenant 11/8/2015 09:21
"Ed: Vishy, check the rear-view mirror, they are coming after you."

I think they're actually going after Carlsen. lol
daftarche daftarche 11/8/2015 10:12
poor vishy has enough top class rivals half his age.
Chornij Skorpion Chornij Skorpion 11/8/2015 10:57
Keymer resigned in this position VS. Liang which is in the .pgn on this page?????????????????????
Bertman Bertman 11/8/2015 01:45
@Chornij It may have been a loss on time. At this moment, the result is the only thing known.
hpaul hpaul 11/8/2015 05:54
Vishy Anand is of course the inspiration for the whole Indian chess revolution. I'm sure he is proud of that achievement and happy as a lark.

On the question of loss on time, I've long thought that pgn files should include a code - such as a "T" - after the final move to indicate loss on time. Otherwise the reader can think the score is incorrect when a player suddenly loses in what looks like a good position.
ulyssesganesh ulyssesganesh 11/9/2015 02:42
kudos to the indian team! these players should be further nurtured to remain as great players at adult level!
KandiRavi KandiRavi 11/9/2015 03:13
Excellent photos
scoobeedo scoobeedo 11/10/2015 09:45
"The overwhelming top-seed was FM Nodribek Abdusattorov (2432). The prodigy from Uzebkhistan
had missed out on the gold in 2014, when he had also been the top seed, and this time seemed
hell bent on making sure history would not repeat itself. He was going fine until round nine, when
he lost to eventual silver winner Nihal Sarin (2096), which left him in fourth."

Hey Nodribek,
if you read this here:

Dont be sad about it! Just go straight on. Analyze your lost games ... wait ... that is wrong, autopsy your lost games, in both ways, what was wrong in the game and what made you to get lured in this wrong ideas.

You will become a GM, which is for sure your target idea. But do not let infect your brain with it. You should play chess for one reason: Because it is fun to play.

Play our fantastic game not because you want to become GM, play it because it is cool and fun!

And ... it is the only sport where a 60 year old sportsman can any time in a "Chess Sport Tournament" play a 12 year old, and it does not look strange!

. . .

By the way, chess organizers:

I think that in the future should have ALL chess tournaments the wording "Chess Sport ..... and whatever Tournament etc.". It should be promoted that chess is a sport! SO, includealways the word "Sport".

When it become standard and everybody is used to it, it will improve the recognition of the chess sport around the world.
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