Tal 08: Gelfand still leads, Carlsen now second

6/22/2013 – Gelfand was held to a draw easily by Mamedyarov while Carlsen beat Nakamura and is now in second place. With the correct results tomorrow Carlsen might even win the tournament with a last minute streak. Caruana beat Morozevich in a complex game and ties for third alongside Mamedyarov, Nakamura and Andreikin. Report, standings and pictures

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The Eighth International Tal Memorial Chess Tournament is being held from June, 13 to 24, 2013, with a rest day on June 16. The rounds generally start at 15:00h (=3 p.m.) Moscow time, with the first round starting at 6 p.m. and the final round at 1 p.m. Accommodation is in the Ritz-Carlton, Moscow, Tverskaya str. 3, while the event takes place in the in New Technologies Center Digital October, Bersenevskaya Embankment 6, in Moscow. The tournament has ten invited players and is a round robin with time controls of one hour and 40 minutes for the first 40 moves, followed by 50 minutes for next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds for each move starting from move one. Full information on special rules, regulation, prize money, etc. can be found in our initial report.

Round eight express report

Round 08 – June 22 2013, 15:00h
Alexander Morozevich 2760
0-1
Fabiano Caruana 2774
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
½-½
Sergey Karjakin 2782
Vishy Anand 2786
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
Boris Gelfand 2755
½-½
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
Magnus Carlsen 2864
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura 2784

Anand, Vishy - Kramnik, Vladimir ½-½
This variation of the Nimzo has not given White good results in the recent past. Black has managed to find a few ways of creating complicated counterplay, though in occasions they also are able to eliminate White's play and transpose into drawish endgames. This was what happened today as Kramnik had no problem holding a double rook endgame in which he was down a pawn for a very brief amount of time.

A large crowd gathered to see the postmortem, where Kramnik explained how to neutralize the Nimzo.

Andreikin, Dmitry - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½
Andreikin's 16.b4!? was an interesting sacrifice that Karjakin did not dare accept. Had he accepted it he would've gained a pawn but his queenside would have been under enormous pressure. Instead, Karjakin decided to give a pawn up himself, with the idea of trying to hold on to the game by liquidating the queenside and exploiting White's crippled pawn structure. Karjakin was able to do this and even regain his pawn, after which neither side had winning chances.

Gelfand, Boris - Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar ½-½
Mamedyarov was able to equalize easily out of the opening, and in queenless middlegame that almost certainly was headed towards a draw the players decided to repeat moves and spare everyone the mandatory mass simplification that would have followed otherwise.

Caruana used his opponent's time pressure to full effect and was able trick Morozevich.

Morozevich, Alexander - Caruana, Fabiano 0-1
After obtaining some play against Fabiano's crippled pawns on the kingside, Morozevich decided that the best plan of action was to launch a direct assault on the monarch... despite the lack of queens on the board! Maybe this was inspired by Gelfand's mating net from yesterday's game against Nakamura. In any case Morozevich's attack was not as successful. He snatched a pawn thanks to it but his pieces were in awkward positions while his opponent's bishops dominated the board. Caruana played the tricky 37...c4!? in time pressure and Morozevich panicked. Taking the pawn would have given Black nothing more than a perpetual, but he let the c-pawn go without any piece being able to stop it. Caruana sacrificed a piece in a simple combination that forced the pawn to a queening square and Morozevich resigned.

Carlsen now has chances to win the tournament, for example if he wins tomorrow and Gelfand only draws.

Carlsen, Magnus - Nakamura, Hikaru 1-0
Nakamura's handling of the opening was not good. Carlsen obtained a nearly decisive positional advantage by placing strong pawns on d5 and e5 that were supported by a magnificent knight blockading on c4. Carlsen's technique was somewhat sloppy after that, as there was no reason to allow Black's exchange sacrifice on e5 which at least let him breathe by eliminating the strong central pawns. This sacrifice would have been even stronger if Nakamura played it earlier, on move 30, after which a large portion of White's advantage would have dissipated. As it was Carlsen's exchange was still a strong advantage, he played a good endgame and converted the full point.

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Schedule

Round 01 – June 13 2013, 15:00h
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
½-½
Alexander Morozevich 2760
Vishy Anand 2786
0-1
Fabiano Caruana 2774
Boris Gelfand 2755
½-½
Sergey Karjakin 2782
Magnus Carlsen 2864
1-0
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
0-1
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
Round 02 –June 14 2013, 15:00h
Alexander Morozevich 2760
½-½
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
Boris Gelfand 2755
0-1
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
Sergey Karjakin 2782
½-½
Magnus Carlsen 2864
Fabiano Caruana 2774
0-1
Boris Gelfand 2755
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
½-½
Vishy Anand 2786
Round 03 – June 15 2013, 15:00h
Vishy Anand 2786
1-0
Alexander Morozevich 2760
Boris Gelfand 2755
½-½
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
Magnus Carlsen 2864
0-1
Fabiano Caruana 2774
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
1-0
Sergey Karjakin 2782
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
Round 04 – June 17 2013, 15:00h
Alexander Morozevich 2760
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
Sergey Karjakin 2782
½-½
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
Fabiano Caruana 2774
0-1
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
½-½
Magnus Carlsen 2864
Vishy Anand 2786
½-½
Boris Gelfand 2755
Round 05 – June 18 2013, 15:00h
Boris Gelfand 2755
1-0
Alexander Morozevich 2760
Magnus Carlsen 2864
1-0
Vishy Anand 2786
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
½-½
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
½-½
Fabiano Caruana 2774
Vladimir Kramnik 2727
½-½
Sergey Karjakin 2782
Round 06 – June 19 2013, 15:00h
Alexander Morozevich 2760
½-½
Sergey Karjakin 2782
Fabiano Caruana 2774
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
½-½
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
Vishy Anand 2786
0-1
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
Boris Gelfand 2755
½-½
Magnus Carlsen 2864
Round 07 – June 21 2013, 15:00h
Magnus Carlsen 2864
½-½
Alexander Morozevich 2760
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
0-1
Boris Gelfand 2755
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
½-½
Vishy Anand 2786
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
0-1
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
Sergey Karjakin 2782
½-½
Fabiano Caruana 2774
Round 08 – June 22 2013, 15:00h
Alexander Morozevich 2760
0-1
Fabiano Caruana 2774
Dmitry Andreikin 2713
½-½
Sergey Karjakin 2782
Vishy Anand 2786
½-½
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
Boris Gelfand 2755
½-½
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
Magnus Carlsen 2864
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
Round 09 – June 23 2013, 13:00h
Hikaru Nakamura 2784
-
Alexander Morozevich 2760
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2753
-
Magnus Carlsen 2864
Vladimir Kramnik 2803
-
Boris Gelfand 2755
Sergey Karjakin 2782
-
Vishy Anand 2786
Fabiano Caruana 2774
-
Dmitry Andreikin 2713

All pictures by Etery Kublashvili

 


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Topics Tal Memorial
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