Blunder Check - Your quick and easy game analysis

by Albert Silver
9/30/2021 – Since the earliest days of Fritz, there have been automated ways to analyze games, and over time the sheer variety of tools and options has expanded to cover just about every choice, from the shallow blunder check to the deep full game analysis. But calling the blunder check shallow is to not do it justice, so see why it deserves to become your go-to tool for all your online games.

Fat Fritz 2 SE + Fritz Powerbook 2021 Fat Fritz 2 SE + Fritz Powerbook 2021

Fat Fritz 2.0 is the successor to the revolutionary Fat Fritz, which was based on the famous AlphaZero algorithms. This new version takes chess analysis to the next level and is a must for players of all skill levels.

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Inside any of the latest Fritz interfaces, from Fritz 17 to Fat Fritz 2 to Komodo Dragon 2, you enjoy a common core of tools that help maximize the ways to get the most from those engines. Perhaps the most traditional, yet useful ones are the automated game analysis, which provide super GM analysis in seconds, albeit without the deep crystalline thoughts those players enjoy. The least complex one, with the fewest options, is the Blunder Check, yet in many ways it is the most useful.

Fat Fritz 2

Fat Fritz 2.0 is the successor to the revolutionary Fat Fritz, which was based on the famous AlphaZero algorithms. This new version takes chess analysis to the next level and is a must for players of all skill levels.

What it is

Blunder Check is the simplest and most straightforward of the analysis tools. You can configure it as you choose, but at its core, it is designed to tell you simply where a mistake was made, and what the better move would have been. To an engine maybe all our moves will be cast in doubt, but simply knowing the most egregious moves can be incredibly helpful, sharpening our eye to the possibilities a position offered. If you are enjoying a series of blitz games online, taking the time to run them through every game or couple of games will help you leverage the most out of these sessions. Otherwise you might be condemned to repeat the same mistakes over and over if you are unaware they are mistakes.

Don't let this be your reaction after repeating the same mistake

How to use it

The first step is to have the interface open. You'll want to have a game in the notation to analyze. It doesn't matter which playing site you choose to play on, so long as you can save it as a PGN or copy the notation to the clipboard. If you have it saved as a PGN, you can open it by double-clicking, but if you simply have the game open you can copy it to the clipboard and paste it.

Komodo Dragon 2

Komodo Dragon 2 has both excellent positional play - thanks to the neural network - and tremendous tactical power and computing speed, thanks to the classic Alpha Beta engine.

Copying from Playchess

After a game is over, just use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl-C and the game will be copied to the clipboard.

Now go to the Fritz GUI and press Ctrl-V. It doesn't get any easier than that.

Once the game is there go to the top menu and choose Analysis, then press Blunder Check

A small pane with several options will open. For a quick run through, I suggest highlighting only the moves that saw swings of 100 centipawns, and at a depth of 16 plies. This is actually more than enough to catch the moves that slipped through the cracks, and still scan the entire game in a few seconds.

Does this cover all the subtle mistakes or options that deserved examining? No, but it does make sure that outstanding mistakes, AKA blunders, will be spotted so you can hopefully avoid them the next time.

A glimpse as it finishes in under five seconds on a laptop

You can purchase Fat Fritz 2 in the ChessBase Shop by clicking on this link.


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications, and the content creator of the YouTube channel, Chess & Tech.
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brownj brownj 9/30/2021 11:11
Thanks, interesting article. What is the difference between 'Tactical Analysis' in Chessbase and 'Blunder Check' in Fritz?
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