2010 Chess Olympiad: Ukraine crushes France; Russian women are gold

by Albert Silver
10/1/2010 – It was a round that pretty much illustrated the Olympiad: the Russian women swept Bulgaria for the gold, Ukraine clobbered France to maintain their lead going into the last round, and the top-rated players stumbled (again), while Ivanchuk and Shirov played masterpieces to the delight of chess fans. In the round ten report, we bring diagrams and pics galore. GM Karsten Müller comments.

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The 2010 Chess Olympiad takes place from September 21st to October 3rd in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. It is an 11-round Swiss System team event, in which each team has four players with one reserve.

Time control: 90 minutes/40 moves + 30 minutes + 30 seconds/move as of move one.

Game start: rounds 1-10 at 9 AM UTC (5 AM New York / 2 AM Pacific daylight), and round 11 at 5 AM UTC (1 AM New York / 10 PM Pacific daylight)

Rest day: September 26th (after round 5) and October 2nd (after round 10).

2010 Chess Olympiad Khanty-Mansiysk

Round 10

It was a round defined by both the terrible and the sublime. On the terrible side, some players played uncharacteristically poorly, such as both 2800+ players losing once again. We could give you a game, or a diagram, but frankly, there are diagrams galore to follow for the sublime. The top match was between Ukraine against France, and after Ivanchuk’s loss yesterday, one had to wonder how he and the team would respond in this crucial penultimate round. The answer was a merciless 3.5-0.5 route of the young French players, with wins by all three top boards. Although Ivanchuk’s win over 19-year-old prodigy Vachier-Lagrave was the longest by far, his endgame win was truly one of the sublime, with spectacular technique and a perfect marriage of strategy and tactics.


Superb Ukraine scored a crushing 3.5-0.5 against their French challengers.

Noted endgame expert GM Karsten Müller has generously included detailed comments, with GM John Nunn pitching in a few choice words of his own.

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2754) - Vachier-Lagrave,Maxime (2721) [A15]
39th Olympiad Men Khanty-Mansiysk RUS (10), 01.10.2010

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Qb3 Nb6 6.d4 Bg7 7.Bf4 Be6 8.Qa3 0-0 9.e3 N8d7 10.Rd1 a5 11.Ng5N 11.d5 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 Bxd5 13.c4 Bxf3 14.gxf3 e6 15.h4 Qf6 16.Be2 e5 17.Bg5 Qc6 18.h5 f6 19.Bh6 Rf7 20.Rg1 f5 21.f4 Re8 22.c5 Qxc5 23.Qxc5 Nxc5 24.hxg6 1-0 in 47 moves. Eljanov,P (2720)-Vachier Lagrave,M (2716)/Germany 2008/CBM 127 Extra (46) 11...Bd5 12.e4 Bc4 13.h4 Bxf1 14.Kxf1 Nf6 15.Qc5 c6 16.Nf3 e6 17.Qd6 Nc4 18.Qxd8 Rfxd8 19.b3 Na3 20.Be5 Ng4 21.Bxg7 Kxg7 22.Ke2 Though a more pleasant ending for white, Ivanchuk conducts it with beautiful technique, and great patience. 22...h5 23.Rd2 Nf6 24.Rc1 Ne8 25.Na4 Nd6 26.Ke3 Nab5 27.Ne5 Nc7 28.f3 Nce8 29.Nb6 Ra6 30.Nbd7!








White's first goal is to reposition his knights to their ideal squares, c5 and b6. 30...Raa8 30...f6? with the idea of attacking d7's defender, is not possible because of 31.Nc5! fxe5 32.Nxe6+ Kf6 33.Nxd8 31.Nc5 Nc7 32.Rcd1 Ra7 33.Rc1 Raa8 34.Ned3 Rab8 35.Nf4 Rh8 36.Rcc2 Nde8 37.Kf2 Nf6 38.Nfd3 Nfe8 39.Ne5 Nd6 40.Ned7 Rbd8 41.Nb6.








Mission accomplished. Now for the second part which is to prepare a break. 41...Rhe8 42.Ke3 Ncb5 43.a4 Nc7 44.Rb2 Re7.








45.b4! axb4 Ivanchuk's lovely point is that the attempt to win the exchange with 45...Na8 is met by 46.bxa5 Nxb6 47.axb6 Nc4+ 48.Kd3 Nxd2 49.Rxd2 and the passed queenside pawns rule. A sample continuation is 49...e5 50.Kc3 exd4+ 51.Rxd4 Rxd4 52.Kxd4 g5 53.a5 gxh4 54.Nxb7! 46.Rxb4 Na6 47.Rbb2 Nc7 48.Rdc2.








The Ukrainian grandmaster has created another strategical masterpiece: "Ivanchuk's Initiative" (Müller) 48...Kh6 The king is slightly misplaced here which will be felt in the following. The immediate 48...e5! 49.dxe5 Rxe5 gives Black more counterplay as 50.Nxb7? (50.Kf2 is called for.) 50...Nxb7 51.Nc4 Re7 52.Rxb7? Nd5+-+ (Müller) 49.Kf2!? A very strong prophylactic move. The direct 49.Nc4?! allows Black to reduce the pressure by 49...Nxc4+ 50.Rxc4 b5 (Müller) 49...Na8 Now it is too late for 49...e5? due to 50.dxe5 Rxe5 51.Nxb7! Nxb7 52.Nc4+- (Müller) 50.Nc4 Nxc4 51.Rxc4 b6 52.Nd3 c5.








53.a5!! A spectacular undermining shot. (Müller) 53...Rxd4 White has a very dangerous initiative, which Ivanchuk handles masterfully. (Müller) If black were to take with the pawn with 53...cxd4 then white pushes with 54.a6! (54.axb6?! Rb7 55.Rc6 Rdb8 56.Ne5 (56.Ra2!?) 56...Nxb6 57.Nxf7+ Rxf7 58.Rbxb6 Rxb6 59.Rxb6 and due to the large drawish tendency of rook endings Black still has hopes to survive. (Müller)) 54...Ra7 55.Nb4 d3 56.Ke1 (56.Ke3? would be a mistake after 56...d2 57.Rxd2 Rxd2 58.Kxd2 Nc7 with chances to hold.) 56...f5 57.e5 b5 58.Rc6 Nc7 59.Rd6 Rda8 (59...Rxd6 60.exd6 Nd5 61.Nxd5 exd5 62.Ra2 b4 63.d7 Rxd7 64.a7) 60.Ra2 and white's king will decide it.; 53...bxa5 54.Nxc5 and on top of white's far superior pieces, the a-pawn is doomed.


19-year-old Maxime Vachier-Lagrave facing Ivanchuk at his best.

54.Rxd4 cxd4 55.axb6 Rb7 It might seem as if black is about to get his house in order, but... 56.Ne5! Rxb6 56...f6?! 57.Nc4 Black's knight is imprisoned. (Müller) 57.Ra2! Ivanchuk does not exchange his active rook, which is an excellent practical decision. The technical endgame after 57.Nxf7+? Kg7 58.Rxb6 Nxb6 59.Ne5 is by no means easy to assess. (Müller) 57...Nc7.








58.Ra7! Activity is of the utmost importance in this type of endgame with rook and knight vs rook and knight as both pieces do not like to defend passively. The greedy 58.Nxf7+? violates the principle "Do not rush" and allows Black to continue the fight with 58...Kg7 59.Ne5 Rb7 60.Nc6 Kf6 61.Nxd4 e5 62.Nc2 Ne6 (Müller) 58...Rb2+ 58...Na6 also doesn't save after 59.Nxf7+ Kg7 60.Ne5+ Kg8 61.Kg3 Nc5 62.Ra5 Nb3 63.Ra8+ Kg7 64.Ra7+ Kg8 and here white wins with the spectacular king penetration:








65.Kf4! Rb5 66.Kg5!! Rxe5+ 67.Kxg6 Kf8 68.Kf6! Ra5 69.Rb7! Ke8 70.Rxb3 Kd7 71.g4!+- 59.Kg3 Rc2 60.Nxf7+ Kg7 61.Ne5 Kf6 62.Kf4 Ke7 63.g3 Rc5.








63...Kf6 does not help due to 64.Rb7 d3 65.Nxd3 e5+ 66.Ke3 (66.Nxe5? Ne6+) 66...Rc3 67.Kd2+- (Müller) 64.Rb7! A very nice move. Black is in a kind of zugzwang. (Nunn) 64...Kd6 65.Rb6+ Ke7 66.g4 hxg4 67.fxg4 g5+ 68.hxg5 Rb5 69.Rc6 Rb7 70.Rc4?! White could have won more easily by 70.g6! Kf6 71.g5+ Kg7 72.Rd6 but the move played is also sufficient. (Nunn) 70...Nb5 71.Rc8 Nc3 72.Rh8 Ne2+ 73.Kf3 Rb5 74.g6 Ng1+ 75.Kg2 Rxe5 Vachier-Lagrave gives the exchange as 75...Kf6? runs into 76.Rf8+ Kg7 (76...Kxe5 77.g7) 77.Rf7+ Kg8 78.Nd7+- (Müller) 76.g7 Rg5 77.g8Q Rxg8 78.Rxg8 d3 79.Ra8 d2 80.Ra1 Ne2 81.Rd1 Nc3 82.Rxd2 Nxe4 83.Re2 Ng5 84.Kg3 Kf6 85.Kh4 Kg6 86.Re3 Kh6 87.Ra3 Kg6 88.Ra8 Nf3+ 89.Kg3 Ne5 90.Ra6 Kg5 91.Ra5 after Kf6 92.g5+ Kf5 93.g6 Kf6 94.Rxe5 Kxe5 95.g7+- (Müller) 1-0 [Click to replay]

The Russians also kept their hopes for gold alive by beating the Chinese after Grischuk beat Wang Hao in the only decisive game of the match.


Wang Yue playing Vladimir Kramnik in the China-Russia 1 encounter.

The United States had also been in contention for a medal in a field with many, but lost to Israel 3-1. One of the games was a mixture of the terrible and sublime, as Kamsky suffered a nasty lapsus memoriae (memory lapse) and blundered a pawn in the opening, yet Sutovsky continued with an inspired attack.

Sutovsky,Emil (2665) - Kamsky,Gata (2705) [B43]
39th Olympiad Men Khanty-Mansiysk RUS (10), 01.10.2010

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.Nc3 a6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 b5 6.Bd3 Qb6 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.0-0 Nge7 9.Be3 Qc7?








Ouch. An ugly slip which just loses a pawn. Qb8 was the move. 10.Bxb5! Rb8 Really no choice. Taking with 10...axb5 is not an option. 11.Nxb5 Qb8 (11...Qd8? 12.Nd6#) 12.Nd6+ Kd8 13.Bf4 11.Bxc6 Nxc6 12.b3 Bb7.








13.Nd5! One has to like Sutovsky's energy. He is not interested in simply carrying his extra pawn to the endgame. 13...exd5 14.exd5 Nd8 15.Re1 Ne6 The only move. Among other moves 15...Be7 fails to 16.Ba7 Threatening d6 as well. 16.Qd2 Bb4 17.Qxb4 Bxd5 18.Qd2 Bxf3 19.Bf4! d6 20.gxf3 Rd8 21.Rad1 0-0 22.Bxd6 Qc8 23.f4?








This could have been a costly mistake. 23.c4! h6 24.c5 23...Nc5? 23...Ng5! could have really confused the issue. 24.Re3 (24.fxg5? Qg4+ is a draw.) 24...Qg4+ 25.Kf1 Nf3 24.Qc3 Rfe8 25.Rxe8+ Rxe8 26.f3 Rd8 27.Rd5 Qe6 28.Qxc5 Rc8 29.Qxc8+ Qxc8 30.Be7 1-0 [Click to replay]

It is worth mentioning that although both Ivanchuk and Karjakin are still at the very top of the Elo performance leaderboard, each with 7.5/9 and roughly 2900 performances, GM Emil Sutovsky is currently in the very top spot, with 6.0/7 and 2938.


Alexei Shirov played one of his vintage masterpieces against Baadur Jobava.

The tactical genius, Alexei Shirov, is almost always an entertaining player to watch, and upon occasion is capable of producing breathtaking games that leave a lasting impression. His game against Jobava, in Spain’s 3-1 victory over Georgia, was just such a game.

Shirov,Alexei (2749) - Jobava,Baadur (2710) [B12]
39th Olympiad Men Khanty-Mansiysk RUS (10), 01.10.2010

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.Be2 Ne7 6.0-0 Bg6 7.Nbd2 Nf5 This line has been played by Jobava a number of times. 8.g4 Ne7 9.Nh4 c5 10.c3 Nbc6 This move is actually a novelty. Previously played here was Nec6. 11.Nb3 c4 12.Nd2 h5 13.g5 Nf5 14.Ndf3 Be7 15.Kh1 b5 16.Nxf5 Bxf5 17.Nh4 Be4+ 18.f3 Bh7 19.Rg1 b4.








20.g6! Bxh4 21.gxh7 g6.








It is hard to believe that Black could have any real problems here, yet Shirov is able to stir things up to no end for his opponent. Jobava is assuredly a superb player, but he is unwise to play on Shirov's greatest strengths. 22.cxb4 Qb6 23.Be3 Nxe5 24.b3! Shirov's plan is quite clear: he plans to open lines for his pieces and take advantage of black's lack of coordination and open king in the center. 24...cxb3 25.axb3 Nd7 26.b5 Rxh7 27.Ra6 Qb7 28.Qc2 Nb8.








29.Rxg6!! Fire on the board! 29...fxg6 30.Rxe6+ Kd8 31.Qxg6.








31...Qf7 The alternative is 31...Re7 where white also continues with 32.Bg5! Bxg5 33.Qxg5 Qd7 34.Rxe7 Qxe7 35.Qxd5+ Kc7 36.Bc4! Black cannot protect the rook. 36...Qe1+ 37.Kg2 Quite simply, after the rook is taken and the dust settles, the endgame is an easy win. 37...Qh4 38.Qxa8 Qxd4 (38...Qg5+ 39.Kf1 Qc1+ 40.Ke2 Qb2+ 41.Ke3 and black quickly runs out of checks.) 39.Qd5 32.Bg5+! Bxg5 33.Qxg5+ Kc8 34.Qxd5 Rg7 35.Bc4 Qg8 36.Rc6+ Nxc6 37.Qxc6+ Kb8 38.Qd6+ Kc8 39.Bxg8 Rxg8 40.d5 h4 41.Qc6+ Kb8 42.d6 Rc8 43.Qd5 h3 44.Kg1 1-0 [Click to replay]

 


Alexei Shirov in good spirits after his game.

The Russian women took the gold with one round to spare in a crushing 4-0 defeat of Bulgaria, including a win by top-board GM Tatiana Kosintseva (2573) over GM Antoaneta Stefanova (2551). Though China is in sole second place, they are followed by no less than four teams a half-point behind, any of whom could take silver should China fail to beat their last round opponents, Ukraine. This group of four is Russia 2, Ukraine, Poland, and Georgia.


The Russia 1 team took the Olympic gold one round in advance with their 4-0 route
of the Bulgarian team.

In the women’s section, the top three performers are currently Ukraine’s Inna Gaponenko with 7.5/8 and a 2691 performance, followed by Nadezhda Kosintseva with 8.5/10 and a 2662 performance, and Tatiana Kosintseva with 6.5/9 and 2644. A special note should be made on Azerbaijani Zeinab Mamedjarova, the sister of top player Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, who is rated 2234, yet has 8.0/10 and a 2608 performance, including three games against GMs, which may well constitute a full GM norm already.

The last round, to be played on Sunday at 4 AM UTC (1 AM NY time – this time is Saturday after midnight to be clear), will feature Ukraine against Israel, who are currently sole third and a full point behind the leaders, as well as Russia 1, sole second and half a point behind Ukraine, versus Spain. Further matches with fights for medals are Poland against Hungary, and France against Armenia, though they are most certainly vying for bronze.

Men's team pairings for round 11
Women's team pairings for round 11

Photographs by FIDE, Turkish Chess Federation, and CNC.

Watching the games

It goes without saying that the options to watch the games live are wide and varied. You can watch them at no cost on Playchess, enjoying the software's new options to display multiple boards at the same time, and if you are a Premium member, live grandmaster commentary will be provided on Playchess for every round by GM Daniel King, author of the best-selling Power Play series, and GM Yasser Seirawan. If you miss the live games, you can always watch the commentary after the fact, or get an abridged tale via the Daily Roundup show also hosted on Playchess at 6 PM UTC (2 PM New York). Again, if you miss the show, it remains available on the server at your disposal.

Video reports

We received video reports by both Elmira Mirzoeva and Europe Echecs which we are sharing with their kind permission.

 
The discussion on the 2014 Chess Olympiad is presented.

 
The round ten report includes extensive comments by an ebullient Alexandra Kosteniuk on their gold.

Top men's results

Bd
2
 Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
-
10
 France (FRA)
Rtg
3½: ½
1.1
GM
Ivanchuk Vassily
2754
-
GM
Vachier-Lagrave Maxime
2721
1 - 0
1.2
GM
Ponomariov Ruslan
2749
-
GM
Fressinet Laurent
2718
1 - 0
1.3
GM
Eljanov Pavel
2761
-
GM
Tkachiev Vladislav
2632
1 - 0
1.4
GM
Efimenko Zahar
2683
-
GM
Feller Sebastien
2649
½ - ½
Bd
3
 China (CHN)
Rtg
-
1
 Russia 1 (RUS1)
Rtg
1½:2½
2.1
GM
Wang Yue
2732
-
GM
Kramnik Vladimir
2780
½ - ½
2.2
GM
Wang Hao
2724
-
GM
Grischuk Alexander
2760
0 - 1
2.3
GM
Bu Xiangzhi
2695
-
GM
Svidler Peter
2731
½ - ½
2.4
GM
Li Chao B
2633
-
GM
Karjakin Sergey
2747
½ - ½
Bd
9
 United States (USA)
Rtg
-
11
 Israel (ISR)
Rtg
1 : 3
3.1
GM
Nakamura Hikaru
2733
-
GM
Gelfand Boris
2751
½ - ½
3.2
GM
Kamsky Gata
2705
-
GM
Sutovsky Emil
2665
0 - 1
3.3
GM
Onischuk Alexander
2688
-
GM
Rodshtein Maxim
2632
½ - ½
3.4
GM
Shulman Yuri
2636
-
GM
Mikhalevski Victor
2610
0 - 1
Bd
16
 Spain (ESP)
Rtg
-
20
 Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
3 : 1
4.1
GM
Shirov Alexei
2749
-
GM
Jobava Baadur
2710
1 - 0
4.2
GM
Vallejo Pons Francisco
2697
-
GM
Gagunashvili Merab
2598
½ - ½
4.3
GM
Salgado Lopez Ivan
2595
-
GM
Mchedlishvili Mikheil
2628
½ - ½
4.4
GM
Magem Badals Jordi
2589
-
GM
Pantsulaia Levan
2599
1 - 0
Bd
21
 Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
-
15
 Poland (POL)
Rtg
1 : 3
5.1
GM
Sedlak Nikola
2550
-
GM
Wojtaszek Radoslaw
2711
0 - 1
5.2
GM
Vuckovic Bojan
2615
-
GM
Socko Bartosz
2657
½ - ½
5.3
GM
Ivanisevic Ivan
2613
-
GM
Miton Kamil
2629
½ - ½
5.4
GM
Markus Robert
2624
-
GM
Bartel Mateusz
2599
0 - 1
Bd
17
 Czech Republic (CZE)
Rtg
-
6
 Armenia (ARM)
Rtg
1½:2½
6.1
GM
Navara David
2722
-
GM
Aronian Levon
2783
0 - 1
6.2
GM
Laznicka Viktor
2690
-
GM
Akopian Vladimir
2691
½ - ½
6.3
GM
Hracek Zbynek
2633
-
GM
Sargissian Gabriel
2677
½ - ½
6.4
GM
Babula Vlastimil
2515
-
GM
Pashikian Arman
2639
½ - ½
Bd
5
 Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
-
35
 Belarus (BLR)
Rtg
3 : 1
7.1
GM
Leko Peter
2724
-
GM
Zhigalko Sergei
2640
½ - ½
7.2
GM
Almasi Zoltan
2707
-
GM
Zhigalko Andrey
2580
1 - 0
7.3
GM
Berkes Ferenc
2678
-
 
Podolchenko Evgeniy
2506
1 - 0
7.4
GM
Balogh Csaba
2608
-
IM
Stupak Kirill
2502
½ - ½
Bd
30
 Italy (ITA)
Rtg
-
7
 Azerbaijan (AZE)
Rtg
2 : 2
8.1
GM
Caruana Fabiano
2700
-
GM
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
2756
½ - ½
8.2
GM
Godena Michele
2551
-
GM
Radjabov Teimour
2748
½ - ½
8.3
GM
Vocaturo Daniele
2581
-
GM
Guseinov Gadir
2611
1 - 0
8.4
IM
Brunello Sabino
2497
-
GM
Safarli Eltaj
2607
0 - 1
Bd
51
 Chile (CHI)
Rtg
-
4
 Russia 2 (RUS2)
Rtg
1 : 3
9.1
GM
Morovic Fernandez Ivan
2580
-
GM
Alekseev Evgeny
2691
½ - ½
9.2
GM
Vasquez Schroeder Rodrigo
2521
-
GM
Vitiugov Nikita
2709
0 - 1
9.3
GM
Campos Moreno Javier B
2484
-
GM
Tomashevsky Evgeny
2701
½ - ½
9.4
 
Lopez Silva Hugo
2413
-
GM
Timofeev Artyom
2690
0 - 1
Bd
25
 Greece (GRE)
Rtg
-
48
 Estonia (EST)
Rtg
2½:1½
10.1
GM
Papaioannou Ioannis
2622
-
GM
Kulaots Kaido
2592
½ - ½
10.2
GM
Banikas Hristos
2590
-
GM
Kanep Meelis
2532
½ - ½
10.3
GM
Mastrovasilis Dimitrios
2569
-
IM
Sepp Olav
2485
1 - 0
10.4
GM
Halkias Stelios
2577
-
IM
Volodin Aleksandr
2433
½ - ½


Click here for complete men's results

Current men's standings (after ten rounds)

Rk. St. Team Team
Gms
  + 
  = 
  - 
 Pts
1 2 Ukraine UKR
10
8
2
0
18
2 1 Russia 1 RUS1
10
8
1
1
17
3 11 Israel ISR
10
7
2
1
16
4 15 Poland POL
10
6
3
1
15
5 5 Hungary HUN
10
7
1
2
15
6 6 Armenia ARM
10
7
1
2
15
7 16 Spain ESP
10
7
1
2
15
8 10 France FRA
10
6
3
1
15
9 4 Russia 2 RUS2
10
7
0
3
14
10 3 China CHN
10
6
2
2
14

Click here for complete men's standings


Top women's results

Bd
1
 Russia 1 (RUS1)
Rtg
-
12
 Bulgaria (BUL)
Rtg
4 : 0
1.1
GM
Kosintseva Tatiana
2573
-
GM
Stefanova Antoaneta
2551
1 - 0
1.2
IM
Kosintseva Nadezhda
2565
-
WGM
Voiska Margarita
2314
1 - 0
1.3
IM
Galliamova Alisa
2482
-
WIM
Videnova Iva
2283
1 - 0
1.4
WGM
Gunina Valentina
2465
-
WGM
Velcheva Maria
2272
1 - 0
Bd
8
 India (IND)
Rtg
-
2
 China (CHN)
Rtg
1 : 3
2.1
IM
Harika Dronavalli
2515
-
GM
Hou Yifan
2578
½ - ½
2.2
IM
Karavade Eesha
2365
-
WGM
Ju Wenjun
2516
0 - 1
2.3
WGM
Meenakshi Subbaraman
2336
-
GM
Zhao Xue
2469
0 - 1
2.4
WGM
Mohota Nisha
2332
-
WGM
Huang Qian
2436
½ - ½
Bd
4
 Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
3
 Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
2 : 2
3.1
GM
Dzagnidze Nana
2534
-
GM
Lahno Kateryna
2539
1 - 0
3.2
IM
Javakhishvili Lela
2451
-
IM
Ushenina Anna
2466
½ - ½
3.3
IM
Melia Salome
2439
-
IM
Gaponenko Inna
2469
0 - 1
3.4
IM
Khukhashvili Sopiko
2422
-
IM
Muzychuk Mariya
2464
½ - ½
Bd
17
 Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
-
5
 Russia 2 (RUS2)
Rtg
1 : 3
4.1
IM
Bojkovic Natasa
2368
-
WGM
Pogonina Natalija
2491
0 - 1
4.2
WGM
Chelushkina Irina
2325
-
WGM
Girya Olga
2414
0 - 1
4.3
WGM
Stojanovic Andjelija
2337
-
IM
Bodnaruk Anastasia
2399
0 - 1
4.4
WIM
Rakic Marija
2317
-
WGM
Kashlinskaya Alina
2358
1 - 0
Bd
7
 Armenia (ARM)
Rtg
-
10
 Poland (POL)
Rtg
1 : 3
5.1
IM
Danielian Elina
2466
-
GM
Socko Monika
2486
0 - 1
5.2
IM
Mkrtchian Lilit
2484
-
WGM
Zawadzka Jolanta
2410
½ - ½
5.3
IM
Galojan Lilit
2373
-
WGM
Majdan-Gajewska Joanna
2333
0 - 1
5.4
WGM
Aginian Nelly
2282
-
IM
Dworakowska Joanna
2315
½ - ½

Click here for complete women's results

Current women's standings (after ten rounds)

Rk. St. Team Team
Gms
  + 
  = 
  - 
 Pts
1 1 Russia 1 RUS1
10
10
0
0
20
2 2 China CHN
10
8
0
2
16
3 3 Ukraine UKR
10
7
1
2
15
4 4 Georgia GEO
10
7
1
2
15
5 5 Russia 2 RUS2
10
6
3
1
15
6 10 Poland POL
10
7
1
2
15
7 18 Cuba CUB
10
7
0
3
14
8 6 United States USA
10
6
2
2
14
9 8 India IND
10
7
0
3
14
10 26 Azerbaijan AZE
10
7
0
3
14

Click here for complete women's standings


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Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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