World Team Ch. – China beats Ukraine; USA holds Armenia

7/18/2011 – The second round of the World Team championship, brought two very surprising results, potentially skewering the predictions of the pundits. The first was Ukraine's loss to the home team, China, when Ding Liren broke the deadlock with a win on board four. The second was the US's surprising draw against Armenia after Kamsky capitalized on errors by Aronian. Round two report.

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The Chinese Chess Association with the patronage and support of the Ningbo Municipal Government and Ningbo Sports Bureau is staging the 2011 World Team Chess Championship in Ningbo, China. The event is being held from July 15 2011 (arrival) to July 26 2011 (Departure) at the playing venue in the five-star New Century Grand Hotel Ningbo.

Round two report


Ivanchuk will have to do some magic if he wishes to help his team to the podium

The second round of the World Team championship, brought two very surprising results, potentially skewering the predictions of the pundits. The first was Ukraine's loss to the home team, China. Ukraine might be missing Ponomariov, but had an otherwise all-star team, and were the gold medalists at last year's Olympiads. Still, China had all their best players, with the home advantage, and it was reigning Chinese champion Ding Liren's decisive victory over Areschenko that tipped the score in their favor.


Ding Liren, who won the Chinese championship with a record performance, proved
the decisive element in China's favor.

The Russians scored their second consecutive win with an impressive 3-1 score over Hungary, including a nice win by Russian champion Ian Nepomniachtchi over Judit Polgar when the latter got into time trouble and missed a decisve tactic.


Nepomniachtchi scored a nice win over Polgar

[Event "8th World Teams"] [Site "Ningbo CHN"] [Date "2011.07.18"] [Round "2"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, I."] [Black "Polgar, Ju"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B60"] [WhiteElo "2711"] [BlackElo "2699"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2011.07.17"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Bg5 Qb6 7. Nb3 e6 8. Bxf6 gxf6 9. Qd2 a6 10. f4 Bd7 11. Be2 h5 12. Rf1 O-O-O 13. O-O-O Kb8 14. Kb1 Be7 15. Rf3 Rdg8 16. Bf1 Rc8 17. Qe1 (17. Rh3 Na5 18. Be2 h4 19. Qe1 Nxb3 20. axb3 Qc5 21. Rxh4 f5 22. Rxh8 Rxh8 23. h3 fxe4 24. Nxe4 Qc7 25. Ng5 f6 26. Nf3 d5 27. Qd2 Bd6 28. f5 {1-0 (40) Karjakin,S (2599)-Nijboer,F (2549)/Wijk aan Zee 2005/CBM 105 (40)}) 17... Nb4 18. Qd2 Nc6 19. a3 Rc7 20. Na2 h4 21. Rh3 Rcc8 22. Qe1 Qc7 23. Qf2 Ka8 24. Nc3 Na5 25. Nc1 Rh5 26. N1a2 Rch8 27. Be2 R5h7 28. Nb4 Be8 29. f5 Qc5 30. Qf1 Nc6 $2 {An unusual oversight by Judit, who is such a tactically alert player, especially considering Nepomniachtchi pointed his pieces at a6 in a rather unsubtle manner.[#]} 31. Bxa6 $1 bxa6 32. Nxa6 Qa5 33. Nb5 Bd8 ({Obviously the knight is protected against} 33... Qxa6 $2 {with} 34. Nc7+ Kb7 {and a mating attack.}) 34. Rb3 {The a6 knight is still untouchable, and Black cannot defend.} Bb6 35. Nxd6 Ne5 36. Nxe8 Rxe8 37. Rd6 Ka7 38. Rdxb6 Qxb6 39. Rxb6 Kxb6 40. a4 $1 Rc8 41. Qb5+ 1-0

WIth three players rated over 2740 playing against them, the Indians had a steep cliff to climb, and were unable to produce a statisical surprise against Azerbaidjan. Mamedyarov and Radjabov both won their games convincingly.

[Event "8th World Teams"] [Site "Ningbo CHN"] [Date "2011.07.18"] [Round "2"] [White "Radjabov, T."] [Black "Harikrishna, P."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2744"] [BlackElo "2669"] [PlyCount "75"] [EventDate "2011.07.17"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 O-O 6. Nbd2 d6 7. c3 Bb6 8. Bb3 Ne7 9. h3 c6 10. Re1 Ng6 11. d4 h6 12. Bc2 Be6 13. Nf1 Qc7 14. Be3 Rad8 15. Qc1 Rfe8 16. Ng3 Qd7 17. a4 Bc7 18. a5 a6 19. Ra4 Qe7 20. c4 Qf8 21. d5 Bd7 22. Ra3 Rc8 23. Qd2 Ne7 24. Bb1 Rb8 25. Rb3 Rec8 26. Nh4 Qd8 27. Ra3 Nh7 {[#]} 28. Nhf5 $2 ({After clustering his pieces, Black left himself open to a tactical blow with} 28. c5 $1 Qf8 (28... cxd5 29. exd5 {and now if} Nf6 {it is the king that comes under fire with} 30. Bxh6 $1) ({Not} 28... dxc5 29. d6) 29. f4 {and the Black center is under extreme pressure due to the vulnerability of his pieces.} ) 28... Nxf5 29. exf5 Qf8 30. Nh5 Bd8 ({Trying to lock it up first with} 30... f6 {would still fail to} 31. Nxg7 $1 Qxg7 32. Bxh6 Qe7 33. Rg3+ {though this was Black's best chance nonetheless.}) 31. f6 Bxf6 {[#]} 32. Bxh6 $1 Qe7 ( 32... gxh6 33. Bxh7+ Kxh7 (33... Kh8 34. Nxf6) 34. Nxf6+ Kg7 35. Nxd7) 33. Bxg7 $1 Bg5 (33... Bxg7 34. Rg3) 34. f4 Bh4 35. g3 Nf6 36. fxe5 Nxh5 37. Qh6 f5 38. Qh8+ 1-0

After their very impressive 3.5-0.5 win over Israel in the first round, Armenia gave a strong impression as a clear contender for the gold. The Israelis have a track record of doing extremely well in team events, and with Aronian on board one, what was not to like. The US team, who are playing without Nakamura, and had lost to the Russians in the previous round certainly didn't seem like they would be their kryptonite, yet that is exactly what happened. On board one, it is precisely Aronian who stumbled against a Kamsky who has been climbing his way back into the elite that allowed the US to hold the Armenians to a 2-2 draw. Yasser Seirawan, who broke a very long fast from competitve chess in the recent US championship, showed his spot on the team was deserved as he held higher-rated Sargissian (2663) to a draw.


Seirawan marked his return to competitive chess in the recent US championship, and
his appearance at the World Team serves as an international confirmation.
He drew
against Gabriel Sargissian (2663) in round two.


Aronian looked like he might be a strong contender for top board, but a nervy loss
against Kamsky in round two showed that he was not yet at his best.

[Event "8th World Teams"] [Site "Ningbo CHN"] [Date "2011.07.18"] [Round "2"] [White "Kamsky, G."] [Black "Aronian, L."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C84"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2805"] [PlyCount "159"] [EventDate "2011.07.17"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. a4 b4 9. Bg5 O-O 10. Nbd2 h6 11. Bh4 Rb8 12. Re1 Na5 13. Ba2 c5 14. Nc4 Nc6 15. Ne3 Be6 16. Bxf6 Bxf6 17. Bc4 Qc8 18. h4 Ne7 19. g3 g6 20. Kg2 Bh3+ 21. Kh2 Bd7 22. Rg1 Bg7 23. h5 Kh8 24. Rg2 f5 $2 {This attempt to counter actively backfires and instead opens Aronian up to weaknesses.} 25. Nh4 Bc6 26. hxg6 f4 27. Nd5 Nxd5 28. Bxd5 Bxd5 29. exd5 c4 30. g4 f3 31. Rg3 {[#]} b3 $2 {Truly the Armenian was in an off-day as this just gives him more trouble as a result. } 32. c3 ({The immediate} 32. Nf5 $1 {was stronger.} Qc5 33. Rxf3 bxc2 34. Qxc2 ) 32... Rf4 33. Nf5 cxd3 $2 {Now Black is just lost.} 34. Qxd3 e4 35. Qe3 Rxf5 36. gxf5 Qxf5 37. Re1 Re8 {[#]} 38. Rxf3 $4 {Time trouble rears its ugly head now. This blunder could have cost Kamsky his win.} (38. Kg1 $1 {removing himself from the pin from Be5 was better.} Qxd5 (38... Be5 39. Qxh6+) 39. Qxf3 $3 exf3 40. Rxe8+ Qg8 (40... Bf8 41. g7+) 41. Rxg8+ Kxg8 42. Rxf3) 38... Be5+ 39. Rg3 Qxg6 40. Kg2 Bxg3 41. fxg3 Kg8 42. Rf1 Rf8 43. Rxf8+ Kxf8 44. Qf4+ { In spite of it all, the endgame is very bad for Black, and defense is difficult. Black's best chance was to not expose himself and keep the monarch out of trouble on g7.} Ke8 45. Kf2 h5 46. Ke3 Kd7 47. a5 Kc8 48. Kd4 Kc7 49. Qxe4 Qxg3 50. Qh7+ Kd8 51. Qh8+ Kc7 52. Qxh5 Qf2+ 53. Kc4 Qc5+ 54. Kxb3 Qb5+ 55. Kc2 Qa4+ 56. Kd2 Qxa5 57. Qf7+ Kb6 58. Qg8 Qb5 59. b4 Kc7 60. Qf7+ Kd8 61. Qf6+ Kc7 62. Qe7+ Kc8 63. Qxd6 Qf1 64. Qe6+ Kb7 65. Qe4 Qf2+ 66. Kd3 Qa2 67. Qf3 Qb1+ 68. Kd4 Qg6 69. Kc4 Kc7 70. Qd3 Qg1 71. Kb3 Qa1 72. c4 a5 73. Qh7+ Kd8 74. Qg8+ Kc7 75. d6+ Kxd6 76. Qd5+ Ke7 77. bxa5 Qb1+ 78. Ka4 Kf6 79. a6 Kg6 80. Ka5 1-0

Results of round two

Bd
10
  Russia
Rtg
3 : 1
6
  Hungary
Rtg
1.1
GM
Karjakin Sergey
2788
½ - ½
GM
Leko Peter
2717
1.2
GM
Grischuk Alexander
2746
1 - 0
GM
Almasi Zoltan
2726
1.3
GM
Nepomniachtchi Ian
2711
1 - 0
GM
Polgar Judit
2699
1.4
GM
Vitiugov Nikita
2733
½ - ½
GM
Balogh Csaba
2643
Bd
7
  Azerbaijan
Rtg
3 : 1
5
  India
Rtg
2.1
GM
Radjabov Teimur
2744
1 - 0
GM
Harikrishna Pentala
2669
2.2
GM
Gashimov Vugar
2760
½ - ½
GM
Sasikiran Krishnan
2681
2.3
GM
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
2765
1 - 0
GM
Ganguly Surya Shekhar
2627
2.4
GM
Guseinov Gadir
2625
½ - ½
GM
Negi Parimarjan
2642
Bd
8
  Ukraine
Rtg
1½:2½
4
  China
Rtg
3.1
GM
Ivanchuk Vassily
2768
½ - ½
GM
Wang Hao
2718
3.2
GM
Eljanov Pavel
2697
½ - ½
GM
Wang Yue
2709
3.3
GM
Efimenko Zahar
2706
½ - ½
GM
Li Chao B
2669
3.4
GM
Areshchenko Alexander
2682
0 - 1
GM
Ding Liren
2654
Bd
9
  Israel
Rtg
3 : 1
3
  Egypt
Rtg
4.1
GM
Sutovsky Emil
2700
1 - 0
GM
Adly Ahmed
2631
4.2
GM
Smirin Ilya
2676
½ - ½
GM
Amin Bassem
2609
4.3
GM
Postny Evgeny
2618
½ - ½
IM
Shoker Samy
2475
4.4
GM
Nabaty Tamir
2584
1 - 0
IM
Ezat Mohamed
2430
Bd
1
  USA
Rtg
2 : 2
2
  Armenia
Rtg
5.1
GM
Kamsky Gata
2741
1 - 0
GM
Aronian Levon
2805
5.2
GM
Onischuk Alexander
2675
0 - 1
GM
Movsesian Sergei
2700
5.3
GM
Shulman Yuri
2617
½ - ½
GM
Akopian Vladimir
2667
5.4
GM
Seirawan Yasser
2635
½ - ½
GM
Sargissian Gabriel
2663

Rank table

Rk. Team
Gms
  + 
  = 
  - 
 Pts
 BPts
 TB3
1 Russia
2
2
0
0
4
6.0
0
2 Armenia
2
1
1
0
3
5.5
0
3 Azerbaijan
2
1
1
0
3
5.0
0
4 China
2
1
1
0
3
4.5
0
5 Ukraine
2
1
0
1
2
4.0
0
6 Israel
2
1
0
1
2
3.5
0
7 India
2
0
1
1
1
3.0
1
8 Hungary
2
0
1
1
1
3.0
1
9 USA
2
0
1
1
1
3.0
0
10 Egypt
2
0
0
2
0
2.5
0

Schedule

Friday 15 July   Arrival
Saturday 16 July 18:00h Opening Ceremony
Sunday 17 July 15:00h Round 1
Monday 18 July 15:00h Round 2
Tuesday 19 July 15:00h Round 3
Wednesday 20 July 15:00h Round 4
Thursday 21 July 15:00h Round 5
Friday 22 July   Rest Day
Saturday 23 July 15:00h Round 6
Sunday 24 July 15:00h Round 7
Monday 25 July 15:00h Round 8
Tuesday 26 July 10:00h Round 9, closing ceremony
Wednesday 27 July   Departure

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 11 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

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