World Cup R4.2: Judit evens the score

9/8/2011 – In the second game of round four in the World Cup the amazing Judit Polgar, a loss down against Cuban GM Lenier Dominguez, actually pulled back with a black-piece win. Navara, Svidler and Radjabov went through, the former two with 2-0 wins, with Peter Svidler eliminating Gata Kamsky. Five of the eight games were decisive, five pairings go to the tiebreaks on Thursday. Illustrated report.

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The tournament is taking place in the Ugorian Chess Academy in the very heart of Khanty-Mansiysk, which has hosted three previous World Cups: 2005, 2007, and 2009. The 128 participants hail from 46 different countries, and are playing for a total prize fund of US $1.6 million. In addition the first three finisher get tickets to the Candidates tournament in the next World Championship cycle.

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Round four game two

The second game of round four was defined by comebacks, and what comebacks they were! The foremost, and most nerve-wracking, was Judit’s win over Lenier Dominguez which had the audience by the throat almost from the opening. We have full game commentary by GM Efstratios Grivas at the end of this report.

Next in line came Peter Heine-Nielsen who had lost in the first game to Vugar Gashimov, and seemed destined to end his excellent run, but he had other plans. After a quiet 5.e3 Gruenfeld, essentially resembling a QGD with a fianchettoed bishop for Black, the Dane negotiated the opening and early middlegame to his advantage and built an attack that yielded a decisive material surplus he converted in due time.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Nielsen, Peter Heine"] [Black "Gashimov, Vugar"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D10"] [WhiteElo "2681"] [BlackElo "2760"] [PlyCount "225"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 g6 5. Nf3 Bg7 6. Be2 O-O 7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4 Bg4 9. Be2 Qb6 10. Qc2 Nbd7 11. Rd1 Bxf3 12. Bxf3 e5 13. dxe5 Nxe5 14. Be2 Rfe8 15. h3 h6 16. Bd2 Qc5 17. Rac1 Rad8 18. a3 Ned7 19. b4 Qe7 20. a4 Qxb4 21. Rb1 Qc5 22. Rxb7 Ne4 23. Rc1 Nxd2 24. Qxd2 Nb6 25. Qc2 Rd7 26. Rxd7 Nxd7 27. Qd2 Qe7 28. a5 Nc5 29. Qc2 Nb7 30. Qa4 Qc5 31. a6 Nd8 32. Na2 Qb6 33. Qb4 Qc7 34. Nc3 Qe7 35. Qb3 h5 36. Bf3 Qc5 37. Ne2 Qd6 38. Rd1 Qc7 39. Nf4 Kh8 40. Qd3 Rf8 41. Qd7 Be5 42. Be2 Kg7 43. h4 Qb6 44. Bc4 Qb4 45. Bf1 Qb6 46. Qe7 Bf6 47. Qe4 Qc7 48. Bc4 c5 49. Rd5 Qc6 50. g3 Qa4 51. Kg2 Re8 52. Qd3 Ne6 53. Nxh5+ gxh5 54. Bb5 Nf4+ 55. gxf4 Qe4+ 56. Qxe4 Rxe4 57. Rxc5 Bxh4 58. Rxh5 ({White has had a winning position for some time now.} 58. Rc7 {would have finised off the opponent more quickly, e.g.:} Rb4 59. Be2 Rb2 60. Kf3 Ra2 61. Rxa7 {etc.}) 58... Bd8 59. Rd5 Bb6 60. Rd6 Re6 61. Rd7 Kf8 62. Rb7 Bc5 63. Rb8+ Kg7 64. Bc4 Re7 65. Kf3 Rc7 66. Bb3 Rd7 67. Ke4 Bd6 68. Rb5 Kf8 69. Kf5 Rc7 70. Rb8+ Ke7 71. Ra8 Bc5 72. Rh8 Rc6 73. Rh7 Rf6+ 74. Ke4 Bb4 75. Bc4 Be1 76. Kf3 Bd2 77. Rh8 Rc6 78. Bb5 Rb6 79. Re8+ Kf6 80. Bc4 Rc6 81. Bd3 Ba5 82. e4 Bb6 83. e5+ Kg7 84. f5 f6 85. e6 Rc7 86. Rb8 Bc5 87. Be4 Bd6 88. Ra8 Bc5 89. Bd5 Be7 90. Ke4 Bf8 91. Bb7 Bc5 92. Kd5 Kh6 93. Bc6 Bxf2 94. Rg8 Be3 95. Rg6+ Kh7 96. Rxf6 Bg5 97. Rg6 Be7 98. Rg2 Rc8 99. Rb2 Rd8+ 100. Bd7 Rf8 101. Ke4 Kg7 102. Rg2+ Kh7 103. Ke5 Bb4 104. Rg3 Be7 105. Rg2 Bb4 106. Rc2 Be7 107. Rc7 Kh6 108. Bc6 Bd8 109. Rb7 Kg5 110. Rg7+ Kh6 111. Rxa7 Bf6+ 112. Ke4 Rc8 113. Rf7 {Nicely played by Vishy Anand's long-time second Peter Heine.} 1-0


Still in contention: Danish GM Peter-Heine Nielsen

The third eleventh-hour save was by World Championship Candidate Alexander Grischuk against European Champion Vladimir Potkin. The latter has been playing superb chess so far, reminding all why he won the European Championship this year, and after winning his first game against Grischuk, seemed poised on making it to the last eight. Grischuk, who had a lackluster Russian championship just recently, was done with disappointments, and came back with a nice win when he broke down Potkin’s French Defense.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Potkin, Vladimir"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C11"] [WhiteElo "2746"] [BlackElo "2682"] [PlyCount "63"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Be3 a6 8. Qd2 b5 9. Nd1 b4 10. Be2 Qb6 11. c3 bxc3 12. Nxc3 Rb8 13. b3 Qa5 14. Rc1 cxd4 15. Nxd4 Nxd4 16. Bxd4 Ba3 17. Rc2 O-O 18. Na4 Bb4 19. Bc3 f6 20. Bg4 Re8 21. Bxb4 Rxb4 22. O-O Bb7 23. a3 Rxa4 24. bxa4 Qxd2 25. Rxd2 fxe5 26. fxe5 Nxe5 27. Be2 Rc8 28. Rb2 Rc7 29. Rb6 Nc4 30. Bg4 g6 31. Bxe6+ Kg7 32. Rxb7 1-0

In fact, it was a bad day for the French, after Zerebukh also lost with it to Navara who completed his round with a fine 2-0 rout. After Zerebukh went for broke with a kamikaze attack in their first game, Navara showed him how it was done by demolishing the Ukrainian’s kingside decisively.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Navara, David"] [Black "Zherebukh, Yaroslav"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C04"] [WhiteElo "2722"] [BlackElo "2590"] [PlyCount "79"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nc6 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. e5 Nd7 6. Bd3 Nb4 7. Be2 c5 8. c3 Nc6 9. O-O a5 10. a4 Be7 11. Re1 O-O 12. Bb5 f6 13. exf6 Nxf6 14. Nf1 Bd6 15. Ng3 Qc7 16. b3 Bd7 17. Ba3 b6 18. Ra2 Rae8 19. Rae2 Nd8 20. Bd3 Nf7 21. Ne5 c4 22. Bxd6 Nxd6 23. bxc4 dxc4 24. Bc2 Nd5 25. Qb1 g6 26. Bxg6 Re7 ({Naturally} 26... hxg6 27. Qxg6+ {is winning for White.}) 27. Qc1 {To avoid the fork on c3. } hxg6 28. Nxg6 Rf6 $2 {Gives away the game.} 29. Nxe7+ Nxe7 30. Nh5 Rg6 31. Nf4 Rg4 32. f3 Rg7 33. Nxe6 Bxe6 34. Rxe6 Ndf5 35. R1e5 Nh4 36. Rxe7 Nxf3+ 37. Kf2 Nxe5 38. Re8+ Kh7 39. Rxe5 Qc6 40. Qc2+ 1-0

Gata Kamsky (above) also tried to be a part of the comeback group, after losing to Peter Svidler in the first game, and for a while seemed to have good chances of doing exactly that. He had White in a Ruy Lopez Archangelsk and had created serious threats against Black’s king, however Svidler showed just how double-edged the position was, and a couple of imprecisions later, it was his pieces that were swarming around the American’s king. Thus, instead of a comeback, Svidler completed a clean sweep of Kamsky, confirming his good phase after his very impressive victory at the recent Russian championship.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Kamsky, Gata"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C78"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2739"] [PlyCount "56"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. a4 Rb8 8. axb5 axb5 9. c3 d6 10. d4 Bb6 11. Be3 O-O 12. Nbd2 h6 13. h3 Re8 14. Qc2 exd4 15. cxd4 Na5 16. Ba2 Bb7 17. e5 Nd5 18. Bb1 g6 19. Bxh6 Nc6 20. exd6 Qxd6 21. Ne4 Qb4 22. Ba2 Nxd4 23. Nf6+ Kh8 24. Nxd4 Nxf6 25. Nc6 Qh4 {I dare you to take the rook!} 26. Nxb8 {Going for broke: but Kamsky needs to win, so what else should he do?} Re2 27. Qc3 Rxf2 28. Nc6 Rxf1+ {and White gets mated.} 0-1

Also headed to tiebreaks are Cuban GM Lazaro Bruzon and Ruslan Ponomariov of Ukraine, who were unable to break their deadlock, as well as Vassily Ivanchuk and Bu Xiangzhi. Teimour Radjabov also passed straight to the next round after winning his first game against Jakovenko and then holding him to a draw in their second.


Watch him in the tiebreaks on Thursday: Cuban GM Lazaro Bruzon


Chinese GM Bu Xiangzhi, who is holding the great Vassily Ivanchuk

Judit evens the score

"The magnificent Judit Polgar managed to win on demand, playing black against Lenier Dominguez," writes the official tournament bulletin. The Cuban grandmaster only needed to make a draw in order to advance to the quarter-finals, but instead of playing it safe he went for a very sharp and principled line of the Sicilian. White sacrificed a piece, but failed to create a winning attack, and had to fight for a draw in the endgame. Black had two bishops against a rook and two pawns, but with limited material White had decent drawing chances. The nervous tension was extremely high. White made a couple of inaccuracies, and his situation became critical. However, Polgar missed a clear-cut win, and a well-known theoretical ending with rook + bishop vs. rook arose. White's position was theoretically lost, and Black, despite practical difficulties, slowly found the right sequence. GM Efstratios Grivas has kindly sent us annotations on this game of the day.

[Event "FIDE WC"] [Site "Khanty Mansiysk"] [Date "2011.09.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Dominguez Perez, Leinier"] [Black "Polgar, Judit"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B32"] [WhiteElo "2719"] [BlackElo "2699"] [Annotator "Efstratios Grivas"] [PlyCount "224"] [EventDate "2011.09.07"] [EventCountry "RUS"] {After a patient and well conducted game yesterday, Lenier Dominguez needed just half a point to progress. For Judit Polgar it was a must win situation, if she wanted to be in the next round.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qb6 {I will just copy the comments by a chess blog here: 'This is the famous Grivas Sicilian with 4... Qb6, rightly named after the famous trainer Efstratios Grivas who deeply explored it in the early 90s. The main idea of this early queen move 4...Qb6 is to decentralize the strongly placed white knight on the d4-square. In this way Black immediately achieves his goal.'} 5. Nb3 Nf6 6. Nc3 e6 7. Bg5 {(D) #} ({I call the sub-variations with Bg5 (in general) 'Poseidon'. I do not really believe they cause too much trouble for Black to be really dangerous, but obviously Black did not felt like going for the main lines starting with} 7. Bd3 {, when probably Judit would be somewhat better prepared and would have felt more at home. The Grivas Sicilian helped Black to achieve his goal as well in another crucial recent game from the FIDE World Championship Canditate Matches, when Black had to win in order to stay in touch with qualification:} Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. a4 d6 10. Be3 Qc7 11. f4 b6 12. Qf3 Bb7 13. Nb5 Qb8 14. c3 e5 15. f5 a6 16. Na3 d5 17. Nd2 Qd8 18. Bf2 d4 19. Qe2 Re8 20. Nb3 Nd7 21. Kh1 Bxa3 22. Rxa3 Nc5 23. Bc4 Na5 24. Nxa5 bxa5 25. Qh5 Qc7 26. Bd5 Bxd5 27. exd5 Ne4 28. Bg1 Qc4 29. Raa1 Qxd5 30. Rad1 d3 31. Qf3 Rad8 32. Rfe1 Nf6 33. Qxd5 Rxd5 34. c4 Rd7 35. Bb6 e4 36. c5 Rc8 37. h3 h5 38. Kg1 h4 39. Bxa5 Rxc5 40. Bc3 Rc4 41. Bxf6 gxf6 42. b3 Rb4 43. Kf2 Rd5 44. Ke3 Rxf5 45. Rc1 Rg5 46. Rc4 Rxc4 47. bxc4 Rxg2 48. c5 Re2+ 49. Rxe2 dxe2 50. Kxe2 Kf8 {0-1 Kamsky,G-Gelfand,B Kazan 2011.}) 7... a6 (7... Be7 {is obviously one of the main lines, but still my preferance is for}) (7... Bb4 {. In ChessBase Magazine 135 I published an extensive analysis on this. Judit Polgar is heading towards some even deeper sidelines when the game will become unclear right from the opening.}) 8. Qf3 ({Technically a novelty! More usual is} 8. Bd3 d6 (8... Be7 9. Qe2 d6 10. O-O-O Bd7 11. Kb1 h6 12. Be3 Qc7 13. f4 Nb4 $13 { Wells,D-Pickard,C Birmingham 2006}) 9. O-O Be7 {, for example:} 10. Kh1 Qc7 11. f4 O-O 12. Qe2 b5 13. Rae1 Nd7 14. Bxe7 Nxe7 15. e5 Ng6 16. Qf3 Rb8 17. exd6 Qxd6 18. Ne4 Qc7 19. Nd4 Nc5 20. Nxc5 Qxc5 $11 {Kaminski,M-Grivas,E Moscow 1994.}) (8. Qd2 Be7 9. O-O-O O-O {converts the game into the lines of the Richter Rauzer.}) 8... Be7 9. Qg3 d6 10. O-O-O ({Grabbing a pawn with} 10. Bxf6 Bxf6 11. Qxd6 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 Qd8 {is what would make Black happy in the endgame to come, as she would have clear targets on the c-file.}) 10... O-O 11. Kb1 ({The real novelty of the game! It is always useful to tuck the king away after opposite castling in the Sicilian Defence. The tempo is not seen as lost, because the king overprotects the a2-pawn and steps away from possible tactics on the c1-h6 diagonal. By transposition} 11. Be2 {was seen in an old game:} Rd8 12. Bh6 Bf8 13. h4 Qc7 14. h5 Kh8 15. Be3 b5 16. h6 g6 17. Qf3 Ne8 18. a3 Kg8 19. Bg5 Be7 20. Bxe7 Qxe7 21. Qe3 Qa7 22. Qxa7 Rxa7 23. f4 e5 24. fxe5 Nxe5 25. a4 bxa4 26. Nxa4 Kf8 27. Nc3 Be6 28. Nd4 Ke7 29. g4 Rc8 30. Rhg1 Nf6 31. g5 Nfd7 32. Kd2 Rb8 33. b3 Rb4 34. Ke3 Rc7 35. Na4 a5 36. Rd2 f6 37. Nb5 Rc6 38. Nd4 Rc7 39. Nb5 Rc6 40. Nd4 Rc7 {1/2-1/2 Matanovic, A-Fuderer,A Belgrade 1952.} ) 11... Rd8 12. f4 {The position resembles the Richter-Rauzer Sicilian where White plays an early Nb3. The main difference is that the white queen is on g3 instead of d2, where she is certainly more aggressive on this square.} Qc7 { The lost tempo that was mentioned earlier, releasing the b7-pawn. The black queen is awkward on b6 and Polgar decides to improve this piece. The queen not only prevents e5 for the time being, but also clears the way for the black b-pawn, which is always an important trump in the quest for counterplay.} 13. Bd3 b5 14. Qh4 $5 (14. Bh6 g6 (14... Bf8 15. Bg5 Be7 $11) 15. h4 {was interesting, and I think that White should have tried it.}) 14... h6 $1 15. Bxh6 gxh6 (15... Nxe4 16. Qh3 $1 (16. Bg5 Bxg5 17. fxg5 Nxc3+ 18. bxc3 g6 $15) 16... Nxc3+ 17. bxc3 g6 18. Qg3 {with the idea h4 is unclear, while}) (15... b4 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Qg5+ Kf8 18. Qh6+ Ke8 19. Nd5 $1 exd5 20. Qh8+ Kd7 21. Qh3+ { ends in a draw by perpetual check and the qualification of Dominguez...}) 16. Qxh6 Ne8 $2 (16... b4 {was better objectively, but Polgar is in a must-win situation and can't afford the perpetual (see the previous note), so she is trying to use the knight to cover the checks.}) 17. e5 $2 (17. Nd5 $1 {seems to be very strong, the point is that the queen is attacked and capturing on d5 opens the diagonal and the e-file:} exd5 18. exd5 $16 {.}) 17... f5 $1 {The problem for Dominguez is that he is down to ten minutes for the remaining 23 moves. This can be a cause of concern if he doesn't find a perpetual...} 18. Bxf5 (18. Qg6+ $5 Ng7 19. h4 {was also unclear.}) 18... exf5 19. Nd5 Bf8 ({ Black again is forced to avoid} 19... Qa7 {due to} 20. Rd3 (20. Qg6+ Ng7 21. exd6 Be6 22. Nxe7+ Nxe7 23. dxe7 Qxe7 $13) 20... Bf8 21. Rg3+ Bg7 22. Nf6+ Kf8 23. Nh7+ {with a draw.}) 20. Nxc7 Bxh6 21. Nxa8 Bxf4 22. exd6 Bxd6 {White headed for an endgame where he will have a rook and two pawns for Black's two minor pieces. No perpetual check, but Black can't hope to convert this into a victory. Not without an error by White, but this possibility exists until he reaches the time control...} 23. Nb6 Be6 24. Nd5 Kf7 25. Ne3 Nf6 26. g3 Ng4 27. Nxg4 fxg4 28. Nd4 Nxd4 29. Rxd4 {With so little material left on the board, there is no clear way to progress for Black, not without a mistake by Dominguez at least!} Bc7 30. Rf1+ Ke7 31. Re4 $6 ({I do not see a way for Black to try for something more after the simple} 31. Rxd8 Bxd8 32. b3 {, as then Black couldn't attack White's pawns. White wrongly preserves both his rooks on the board.}) 31... Rg8 32. a4 Bd6 33. axb5 axb5 34. Rf5 b4 35. Rh5 Rg6 36. h3 {Dominguez is reaching the time control, but still caution is needed as Black holds a pair of bishops and there might be back-rank issues. There was no need to give-up a pawn, although White should still be good enough to draw.} gxh3 37. Rxh3 Kd7 38. Rh7+ Kc6 39. b3 $2 {White should refrain from playing such a move before the time control. Now Black can hope to exploit the weakened dark squares around the king. It won't be easy though...} Bd5 40. Re3 Bxg3 41. Ra7 Rg4 42. Ra4 Bf4 43. Re1 Bd2 44. Rd1 Bc3 {Now the bishop pair dominates and the weakness (c2, b3) are about to be attacked - Black is in a good way...} 45. Ra6+ Kb7 46. Ra5 Be4 47. Ra4 Rg2 48. Ra2 Kb6 49. Rd6+ Kb5 50. Rd1 Bf3 51. Rf1 Kc5 52. Ra7 Be4 53. Rc1 Kb6 54. Ra2 Rg3 55. Rf1 Bg7 56. Kc1 Rg2 57. Kb1 Rd2 58. Kc1 Rh2 59. Kb1 Bc3 60. Rd1 Bf3 61. Rf1 Kc5 62. Ra7 Be4 63. Rc1 Kd4 64. Rd7+ Ke3 65. Re7 Rh6 66. Ra7 {The threat was 66...Ra6!.} Bd2 67. Rg1 Kf2 68. Rd1 Ke2 69. Rg1 Be3 70. Re7 Rh4 71. Rg8 Bd4 72. Ka2 Kd2 73. Rd7 Bxc2 { and Black is winning!} 74. Rh8 (74. Rb8 Bb1+ $1 75. Kxb1 Rh1+ 76. Ka2 Ra1# {.}) 74... Rxh8 $2 (74... Kc1 $1 {was curtains:} 75. Rxh4 Bb1# {.}) 75. Rxd4+ Bd3 76. Rxb4 Kc3 {and according to tablebases this is mate in 21 moves!} 77. Ra4 Rh2+ $2 ({But not like that!} 77... Rb8 {was on the correct track.}) 78. Ka3 Rb2 79. Rg4 $2 ({From now on both sides made a lot of small 'mistakes' in this notorious ending, and I do not feel it is nice to comment on this, safely sitting behind my computer, armed with technology and pretending I know everything. After all, chess is a battle on the board!} 79. Ra7 {was correct by the way!}) 79... Rxb3+ 80. Ka4 Rb1 81. Ka5 Rb5+ 82. Ka4 Rf5 83. Rg3 Rf4+ 84. Ka3 Rf1 85. Rg2 Rh1 86. Rb2 Ra1+ 87. Ra2 Rb1 88. Rg2 Rb3+ 89. Ka4 Rb4+ 90. Ka3 Rb6 91. Rg4 Ra6+ 92. Ra4 Rb6 93. Rg4 Rb7 94. Rh4 Rb1 95. Rh2 Rb6 96. Rh4 Bf1 97. Rg4 Rb5 98. Rg3+ Bd3 99. Rg4 Rb1 100. Rg2 Rb3+ 101. Ka4 Rb5 102. Rg4 Rf5 103. Ka3 Rf1 104. Rg2 Rb1 105. Rh2 Bf5 (105... Bf1 106. Rf2 Bc4 107. Rf3+ Bd3 108. Rf2 Rb3+ 109. Ka2 Rb5 110. Ka1 Re5 111. Rb2 Bc2 {is the trick, but it was not so simple for Judit after five hours of play.}) 106. Rg2 Bd3 $2 {The correct way, leading in mate in ten, but there is problem...} 107. Rh2 {Here White could claim a draw (before playing his move of course) by three-fold repetision (on moves 95, 105 and 107). But somehow he missed it...} Bf1 108. Rf2 Bc4 109. Rf3+ Bd3 110. Rf2 Rb3+ 111. Ka2 Rb6 112. Ka1 Rg6 (112... Rg6 {And White resigned as mate is near:} 113. Rh2 Rg1+ 114. Ka2 Bc4+ 115. Ka3 Ra1+ 116. Ra2 Rxa2# {. An amazing game! Going into the endgame, Dominguez believed he could find a fortress. But deep calculation by Black and slight inaccuracies by White brought her the win. A monumental effort by Judit, fighting spirit by Dominguez. The match goes into tiebreak and the game goes into chess history!}) 0-1


Judit Polgar during the critical second game of round four

Results of round four

Name
G1
G2
 R1
 R2
 r3
 r4
 B1
 B2
 SD
Tot
 Polgar, Judit (HUN)
0
1
             
1.0
 Dominguez Perez, Leinier (CUB))
1
0
             
1.0
 
 Bu, Xiangzhi (RUS)
½
½
             
1.0
 Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Zherebukh, Yaroslav (UKR)
0
0
             
0.0
 Navara, David (CZE)
1
1
             
2.0
 
 Bruzon Batista, Lazaro (CUB)
½
½
             
1.0
 Ponomariov, Ruslan (UKR)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Gashimov, Vugar (AZE)
1
0
             
1.0
 Nielsen, Peter Heine (DEN)
0
1
             
1.0
 
 Potkin, Vladimir (RUS)
1
0
             
1.0
 Grischuk, Alexander (RUS)
0
1
             
1.0
 
 Radjabov, Teimour (AZE)
1
½
             
1.5
 Jakovenko, Dmitry (RUS)
0
½
             
0.5
 
 Svidler, Peter (RUS)
1
1
             
2.0
 Kamsky, Gata (USA)
0
0
             
0.0

Remaining schedule of the World Chess Cup 2011

Date Day Time   Rounds
Players
08.09.2011 Thursday 15:00 Tiebreak
 
09.09.2011 Friday 15:00 Round 5, game 1
8
10.09.2011 Saturday 15:00 Round 5, game 2
 
11.09.2011 Sunday 15:00 Tiebreak
 
12.09.2011 Monday 15:00 Round 6, game 1
4
13.09.2011 Tuesday 15:00 Round 6, game 2
 
14.09.2011 Wednesday 15:00 Tiebreak
 
15.09.2011 Thursday   Free Day
 
16.09.2011 Friday 15:00 Round 7, game 1
2
17.09.2011 Saturday 15:00 Round 7, game 2
 
18.09.2011 Sunday 15:00 Round 7, game 3
 
19.09.2011 Monday 15:00 Round 7, game 4
 
20.09.2011 Tuesday 11:00 Tiebreaks, Closing
 
21.09.2011 Wednesday   Departure
 

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