World Cup R3.2: Fair play in Khanty-Mansiysk

9/5/2011 – Game two of the third round of the World Cup produced an extraordinary display of fairness. First David Navara accidentally touched a piece, but his opponent, Alexander Moiseenko did not insist on the "touch-move" rule that would have lost him the game. Moiseenko was subsequently outplayed by the Czech GM, who with a forced mate on the board offered him a draw. Chess gentlemen.

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The tournament is taking place in the Ugorian Chess Academy in the very heart of Khanty-Mansiysk, which has hosted three previous World Cups: 2005, 2007, and 2009. The 128 participants hail from 46 different countries, and are playing for a total prize fund of US $1.6 million. In addition the first three finisher get tickets to the Candidates tournament in the next World Championship cycle.

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Round three game two – Fair play in Khanty-Mansiysk

Three players proceeded to the fourth round with second-game wins: Vugar Gashimov (Azerbaijan) defeated Evgeny Tomashevsky (Russia), Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan) defeated Etienne Bacrot (France), and Bu Xiangzhi (China) won against Abhijeet Gupta (India).


Teimour Radjabov of Azerbaijan in the process of beating French GM Etienne Bacrot


Top seed Sergey Karjakin was unable to win his second game against Judit Polgar
and has now been eliminated from the World Cup, while Judit is in the next round

Three players, Ian Nepomniachtchi (Russia), Vasily Ivanchuk (Ukraine), and Igor Lysyj (Russia) managed to equalize their scores after their losses yesterday. Ian handled the English Opening against Gata Kamsky (USA) in a very original fashion, didn't spend much time on his moves, and his opponent eventually lost his way.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.04"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Kamsky, Gata"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A34"] [WhiteElo "2711"] [BlackElo "2741"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. g3 g6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7. h4 Nc6 8. h5 Nxc3 9. bxc3 Bf5 10. Qb3 Qb6 11. Ng5 Qxb3 12. axb3 O-O 13. hxg6 hxg6 14. Ne4 Bxe4 15. Bxe4 Rfc8 16. e3 Rc7 17. Ke2 a6 18. g4 e6 19. Ba3 Na7 20. f4 Nb5 21. Bb2 Nd6 22. Bf3 Rd8 23. Ra2 c4 24. bxc4 Nxc4 25. Ba1 Nd6 26. Rb1 Bf6 27. g5 Bg7 28. Rb6 Rdd7 29. Rb3 Re7 30. d4 Nc4 31. Kd3 Nd6 32. e4 Red7 33. e5 Nc8 34. c4 Ne7 35. Bc3 b5 36. cxb5 axb5 37. Ra8+ Rc8 38. Rxc8+ Nxc8 39. Rxb5 Bf8 40. Rb8 Rc7 41. Bb7 1-0

The task of Ivanchuk was more difficult, as he was playing black today. However, Emil Sutovsky (Israel) is a very creative and fearless player, and he lit the fire on the board himself. Black's position looked quite dangerous, and Sutovsky wasn't spending much time on the moves, implying that everything had been analyzed at home. However, either his analysis had a hole or Sutovsky mixed up the move order. Ivanchuk easily parried his attack and won the game.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.04"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Sutovsky, Emil"] [Black "Ivanchuk, Vassily"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B09"] [WhiteElo "2700"] [BlackElo "2768"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. f4 Nf6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. e5 Nfd7 7. h4 c5 8. h5 cxd4 9. hxg6 dxc3 10. gxf7+ Rxf7 11. Bc4 e6 12. Ng5 cxb2 13. Bxb2 Qa5+ 14. Ke2 Nf8 15. Nxf7 Kxf7 16. f5 Bxe5 17. Rh5 Ke8 18. fxe6 Bxe6 19. Bxe6 Qb5+ 20. Qd3 Qxb2 21. Qf5 Qb5+ 22. c4 Qb2+ 23. Kf3 Nc6 24. Qf7+ Kd8 25. Qxf8+ Kc7 26. Rxh7+ Kb6 27. Qxa8 Nd4+ 28. Kg4 Qxg2+ 29. Kh5 Qh2+ 30. Kg6 Qc2+ 31. Kh6 Bf4+ 32. Kg7 Nxe6+ 33. Kf6 Qxh7 34. Kxe6 Qg6+ 35. Ke7 Bg5+ 36. Kf8 Qf6+ 0-1

Igor Lysyj defeated Lenier Dominguez (Cuba) in a very long and tense game and also proceeded to the tie-breaks. Georgian grandmaster Baadur Jobava tried to win at all cost and suffered another defeat against Dmitry Jakovenko.

In the first game of round three Alexander Morozevich (above) had lost with the black pieces to Alexander Grischuk. Now the grandmaster from Moscow, who after a protracted absence from the international tournament scene, has been playing 2800+ level chess, needed to win the second game with white. This is what the spectators saw:

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.04"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Morozevich, Alexander"] [Black "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E35"] [WhiteElo "2694"] [BlackElo "2746"] [PlyCount "23"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 d5 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bxf6 Qxf6 8. a3 Bxc3+ 9. Qxc3 O-O 10. Nf3 Bf5 11. e3 Rc8 12. Rc1 {#and in a position that has occurred at least five times in recent years Alexander Morozevich offered a draw. This meant that he was knocked out and could embark on his journey home.} 1/2-1/2

Asked in the press conference why his opponent had resigned this game so soon and so suddenly, Grischuk answered: "I think it is up to journalists to find this out – it is part of their job." With other words: "I haven't the foggiest idea."

The last game of the day ended in an unexpected way: David Navara (Czech Republic) offered a draw in a winning position against Alexander Moiseenko (Ukraine). As the grandmasters said after the game, Navara touched two pieces simultaneously on the 35th move, and Moiseenko insists that his opponent touched the king first. According to the rules, Navara had to move the king, but each of those moves would lead to his loss. Realizing that Navara made a careless mistake, Moiseenko did not force him to obey the rules, and Navara returned the favor in the end, because he thougth it would be an unfair victory.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2011"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2011.09.04"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Moiseenko, Alexander"] [Black "Navara, David"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2715"] [BlackElo "2722"] [Annotator "Friedel,Frederic"] [PlyCount "228"] [EventDate "2011.08.28"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. Qb3 Nc6 6. Nbd2 Na5 7. Qa4 c5 8. Bg2 Bb7 9. dxc5 bxc5 10. O-O Be7 11. Ne5 Qc7 12. Bxb7 Nxb7 13. Ndf3 Nd6 14. Rd1 Rb8 15. b3 Nfe4 16. Bb2 f6 17. Nd3 h5 18. Rac1 Kf7 19. b4 cxb4 20. c5 Nf5 21. Rc4 Nxc5 22. Nxc5 d6 23. e4 Nh6 24. e5 ({Steve Giddins showed us} 24. Be5 $1 fxe5 25. Nd7 $1 {[%cal Rc4c7,Rd7b8]} Qb7 (25... Qxc4 {is not possible because of} 26. Nfxe5+ dxe5 27. Nxe5+ $18) 26. Nxb8 Rxb8 27. Rb1 {with excellent winning chances.}) 24... dxc5 25. Rd7 Qb6 26. exf6 gxf6 27. Qd1 Nf5 28. Nh4 Rbd8 29. Nxf5 Rxd7 30. Qxd7 exf5 31. Qxf5 Qe6 32. Qd3 h4 33. gxh4 Rh5 34. Re4 Qd5 35. Qe2 {This is the critical position. David Navara reached for the bishop but bumped the king with his hand. His opponent pointed this out, and that according to the touch-move rule he was bound to move the king. However, doing so would have allowed Rxe7, winning a piece. "I realised that my opponent had made a mistake and accidentally touched the piece, as it is not possible that a player of his strength could have blundered so badly. This is the reason I did not insist on his move with the king."} Bd6 36. Qg4 Qf5 37. Qe2 Rh7 38. Qc4+ Kf8 39. Qe6 Bxh2+ 40. Kf1 Qxe6 41. Rxe6 Rxh4 42. Rxf6+ Ke8 43. Ra6 c4 44. Ke2 Bf4 45. Bd4 c3 46. Kd3 Rh1 47. Be3 Bxe3 48. fxe3 Rh2 49. Rxa7 Rd2+ 50. Ke4 Rd1 51. Rc7 Ra1 52. Rc4 Rxa2 53. Rxb4 c2 54. Rc4 Ra4 55. Rxa4 c1=Q 56. Rd4 Ke7 57. Kd3 Qd1+ 58. Ke4 Qf1 59. Ke5 Qf3 60. Re4 Kd7 61. Kd4 Kd6 62. Rf4 Qd1+ 63. Kc3 Ke5 64. Rc4 Qc1+ 65. Kd3 Qa3+ 66. Kd2 Qb2+ 67. Kd3 Qb3+ 68. Rc3 Qd1+ 69. Kc4 Ke4 70. Kc5 Qd5+ 71. Kb4 Kf3 72. Rc5 Qd6 73. Kb5 Kxe3 {We now have a position which Black can win, but which can be notoriously difficult to actually do in a practical game, especially when one is under any kind of pressure. Remember, too, that Black has 50 moves to complete the task.} 74. Rc6 Qd5+ 75. Kb6 Kd4 76. Kc7 Qe5+ 77. Kd7 Kd5 78. Ra6 Qg7+ 79. Ke8 Qc7 80. Rh6 Ke5 81. Rg6 Kf5 82. Rh6 Qc1 83. Rd6 Qc8+ 84. Ke7 Qc7+ 85. Rd7 Qe5+ 86. Kd8 Qb8+ 87. Ke7 Ke5 88. Kf7 Qh8 89. Re7+ Kf5 90. Rd7 Qh7+ 91. Ke8 Qg8+ 92. Ke7 Ke5 93. Rc7 Qg7+ 94. Kd8 Qf8+ 95. Kd7 Kd5 96. Rc1 Qf5+ 97. Ke8 Kd6 98. Rd1+ Ke6 99. Re1+ Kf6 100. Rc1 Qb5+ 101. Kd8 Ke6 102. Re1+ Kf7 103. Re7+ Kf8 104. Rb7 Qd5+ 105. Rd7 Qa5+ 106. Rc7 Qa8+ 107. Kd7 Qd5+ 108. Kc8 Ke8 109. Kb8 Kd8 110. Rc8+ Kd7 111. Rc7+ Kd6 112. Rc1 Qb3+ 113. Kc8 Qa3 114. Rd1+ Kc6 {In this position Navara offered his opponent a draw!} ({After} 114... Kc6 {Black has a forced mate:} 115. Kb8 (115. Kd8 Qf8#) 115... Qb3+ 116. Kc8 Qxd1 {and mate in two more moves.}) 1/2-1/2

We remind you that if David Navara had actually executed the mate (which he clearly saw) he would have had a guaranteed prize sum of $20,000, instead of the $12,800 he will get if he does not win the tie-break on Monday. In addition the winner will stay in the fight for the three tickets to the next World Championship cycle.


A prize for fair play? David Navara of the Czech Republic

This story came to knowledge of the Khanty-Mansiysk Governor, Natalia Komarova, who decided to establish a special prize for the World Cup: Fair play. And the President of FIDE, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, said: "We go for nobility, at the chess board as well as in the everyday life. I am very proud of both sportsmen who acted in accordance with FIDE logo: Gens Una Sumus.


Ukrainian GM Alexander Moiseenko

Results of round three

Name
G1
G2
 R1
 R2
 r3
 r4
 B1
 B2
 SD
Tot
 Polgar, Judit (HUN)
1
½
             
1.5
 Karjakin, Sergey (RUS)
0
½
             
0.5
 
 Ivanchuk, Vassily (UKR)
0
1
             
1.0
 Sutovsky, Emil (ISR)
1
0
             
1.0
 
 Zherebukh, Yaroslav (UKR)
½
½
             
1.0
 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar (AZE)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Ponomariov, Ruslan (UKR)
½
½
             
1.0
 Efimenko, Zahar (UKR)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Tomashevsky, Evgeny (RUS)
½
0
             
0.5
 Gashimov, Vugar (AZE)
½
1
             
1.5
 
 Grischuk, Alexander (RUS)
1
½
             
1.5
 Morozevich, Alexander (RUS)
0
½
             
0.5
 
 Bacrot, Etienne (FRA)
½
0
             
0.5
 Radjabov, Teimour (AZE)
½
1
             
1.5
 
 Kamsky, Gata (USA)
1
0
             
1.0
 Nepomniachtchi, Ian (RUS)
0
1
             
1.0
 
 Caruana, Fabiano (ITA)
½
½
             
1.0
 Svidler, Peter (RUS)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Jakovenko, Dmitry (RUS)
1
1
             
2.0
 Jobava, Baadur (GEO)
0
0
             
0.0
 
 Potkin, Vladimir (RUS)
½
½
             
1.0
 Vitiugov, Nikita (RUS)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Parligras, Mircea-Emilian (ROU)
½
½
             
1.0
 Nielsen, Peter Heine (DEN)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Le, Quang Liem (VIE)
½
½
             
1.0
 Bruzon Batista, Lazaro (CUB)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Navara, David (CZE)
½
½
             
1.0
 Moiseenko, Alexander (UKR)
½
½
             
1.0
 
 Gupta, Abhijeet (IND)
½
0
             
0.5
 Bu, Xiangzhi (RUS)
½
1
             
1.5
 
 Dominguez Perez, Leinier (CUB)
1
0
             
1.0
 Lysyj, Igor (RUS)
0
1
             
1.0

Results as a bracket table

View the table in full size on a separate page

On Wednesday, August 31, 64 chess players will continue their battles in the 1/32 of the World Cup Final. We should mention such pairings as Kamsky (USA) vs Kasimdzhanov (UZB), Movsesian (ARM) vs Polgar (HUN), Grischuk (RUS) vs Feller (FRA).

The live commentary on Playchess will continue daily at 13:00h CEST (= 15:00h Moscow, 7 a.m. New York), with GM commentary in English and German. At around 19:00h there will be a wrap-up of the day's events.

Remaining schedule of the World Chess Cup 2011

Date Day Time   Rounds
Players
05.09.2011 Monday 15:00 Tiebreak
06.09.2011 Tuesday 15:00 Round 4, game 1
16
07.09.2011 Wednesday 15:00 Round 4, game 2
08.09.2011 Thursday 15:00 Tiebreak
09.09.2011 Friday 15:00 Round 5, game 1
8
10.09.2011 Saturday 15:00 Round 5, game 2
11.09.2011 Sunday 15:00 Tiebreak
12.09.2011 Monday 15:00 Round 6, game 1
4
13.09.2011 Tuesday 15:00 Round 6, game 2
14.09.2011 Wednesday 15:00 Tiebreak
15.09.2011 Thursday   Free Day
16.09.2011 Friday 15:00 Round 7, game 1
2
17.09.2011 Saturday 15:00 Round 7, game 2
18.09.2011 Sunday 15:00 Round 7, game 3
19.09.2011 Monday 15:00 Round 7, game 4
20.09.2011 Tuesday 11:00 Tiebreaks, Closing
21.09.2011 Wednesday   Departure

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