World Cup 5.3: Caruana, Svidler out

8/25/2013 – Or, on a positive note: Maxime Vachier-Lagrave and Dmitry Andreikin won their games and advanced to the semi-finals. The French GM defeated the top ranked Fabiano Caruana, who played the Dutch Defence and got lost in the resulting Stonewall formation. Andreikin played an off-beat 1.d4-line against Peter Svidler and won the full point in just 30 moves. Report with pictures and analysis.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The FIDE World Cup is a knockout, starting with 128 players, with two games (90 min for 40 moves + 30 min for the rest, with 30 seconds increment) between pairs of players. The tiebreaks consist of two rapid games (25 min + 10 sec), then two accelerated games (10 min + 10 sec), and finally an Armageddon. The winner and the runner-up of the World Cup 2013 will qualify for the Candidates Tournament of the next World Championship cycle. The venue is the city of Tromsø, which lies in the northern-most region of Norway, almost 400 km inside the Arctic Circle. You can find all details and links to many ChessBase articles on Tromsø here. The World Cup starts on Sunday, August 11th and lasts until September 3rd (tiebreaks, closing ceremony). Each round lasts three days, while the final will consist of four classical games. Thursday August 29 is a free day. A detailed schedule can be found here.

Round five tiebreaks

In the first rapid game, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (above left playing black) employed the same maneouver that he had used against Gelfand in the Slav, provoking an early h3 before establishing his bishop on f5. Fabiano Caruana was unable to create chances against this idea and slowly but surely the game went towards a draw.

In a very strange move order the second game eventually arrived at a Stonewall formation. However it seemed that Caruana (left) was a little baffled in this position, as he wasn't able to create anything, while White kept improving his position gradually. He kept shuffling his pieces in the back ranks, waiting for Caruana to make a mistake, which came when he allowed his knight on c4 to be pushed to a5, where it was completely out of play. White eventually won a pawn and obtained a better pawn structure on top of that. After that MVL simply cruised to victory and to the semi-finals.

Dmitri Andreikin (above right) attempted another off-beat d4 but this time with more success. Despite the symmetrical structure the superior placement of his pieces and the quick access to the c-file gave him a considerable edge. Svidler was able to neutralize this, but gave his opponent chances when he played the somewhat over-aggressive 22...Nb4?! instead of the solid 22...Nf6. Andreikin didn't think twice to sacrifice a pawn and obtain a strong initiative that was difficult to defend against in this fast time control. The final blunder in move 29 gave away a piece and the game.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2013"]
[Site "Tromso NOR"]
[Date "2013.08.25"]
[Round "5.3"]
[White "Andreikin, Dmitry"]
[Black "Svidler, Peter"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A45"]
[WhiteElo "2716"]
[BlackElo "2746"]
[Annotator "Ramirez,Alejandro"]
[PlyCount "59"]
[EventDate "2013.08.11"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6 3. Nd2 {It's hard to say that this move can possibly
promise White any kind of advantage. However it is playable and White isn't
worse yet.} h6 4. Bh4 c5 5. e3 Be7 6. c3 b6 7. Ngf3 Ba6 $2 {A very hard move
to understand. Black could always play this after castling short, which is
where he has to castle anyways, after which it is almost a guarantee that
White will develop his light-squared bishop. If this is the case, then why not
wait for the development and win a tempo by playing Ba6 on the next move?} 8.
Bxf6 Bxf6 9. Bxa6 Nxa6 10. Ne4 cxd4 11. Nxf6+ $6 {Also difficult to understand.
The knight had more potential than the bishop in this position, so why trade
it off in such a hurry? The combination of rapid time controls and extreme
fatigue from the long tournament results in many mistakes.} Qxf6 12. cxd4 Qe7
13. O-O O-O 14. Qa4 Nc7 15. Rac1 Nd5 16. Ne5 d6 17. Nd3 Rfc8 18. h3 Qb7 {Black
has been given enough time to consolidate. White doesn't hold an advantage
anymore.} 19. Qa3 Qd7 20. Qa6 f5 $6 {A strange decision from any point of view.
Black has no reason to try too hard to win as White holds some very small
pressure on the queenside that cannot be ignored. So why weaken the kingside/
center on top of that?} (20... Ne7 $1 21. g3 {(or any random move that White
makes, there isn't much to do in the position)} Rxc1 22. Rxc1 Rc8 23. Rxc8+
Nxc8 $11 {and the game will surely end in a draw.}) 21. Rfe1 Kf7 22. Nf4 Nb4 $6
{It is possible that this move is not that bad, but with the clock ticking and
with so much on the line there is absolutely no reason to go munching a pawn
on a2 and stranding Black's own knight.} 23. Qe2 Nxa2 24. Rxc8 Rxc8 25. e4 {
Unsurprisingly this central break puts a lot of pressure on the black position.
Black is still holding but now has to be very careful.} Nb4 26. exf5 exf5 27.
Qf3 a5 $6 (27... d5 $1 {trying to give back material as soon as possible for
simplifications would have allowed Black to still be close to equal.}) 28. Re6
{now the pressure intensifies.} Kg8 29. Qg3 $1 Nd5 $2 {Losing with no
resistance. However already Black's position was very perilous.} 30. Qb3 $1 {
The knight cannot move, and is thus lost. A simple but fatal tactic.} (30. Qb3
Nxf4 31. Re7+ $18) 1-0

 

 

 

Svidler repeated the Caro-Kann variation of the classic game in this must-win scenario. However Black quickly sacrificed a pawn for open lines and strong pressure against White's pawns and even obtained a superior position. Andreikin forced a repetition in a clearly better situation, allowing him to advance to the next round.

Interviews with the winners: Susan Polgar talks to Dmitry Andreikin

... and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, with Europe Echecs producer Gérard Demuydt at the camera

All pictures provided by Paul Truong

All results of the fifth round games

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Tomashevsky, Ev. 2706
½
1
              1.5
Kamsky, Gata 2741
½
½               0.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Vachier-Lagrave, M 2719
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Caruana, Fabiano 2796
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Kramnik, Vladimir 2784
1
½
½
            1.5
Korobov, Anton 2720
0
½
½
            0.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Andreikin, Dmitry 2716
½
½
1
½
          2.5
Svidler, Peter 2746
½
½
0
½
          1.5

Replay the games of the day

Select games from the dropdown menu above the board


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Topics Tromso, World Cup
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register