World Cup 4.3: unparalleled drama in Tromsø

8/22/2013 – What a day! Peter Svidler showed exceptional determination when he ground out a win in 135 moves to eliminate Le Quang Liem. Then Evgeny Tomashevsky lost a virtually won position in the first accelerated game against Alexander Morozevich. He fought back and won a mind boggling 169-mover and finally went through in the blitz, calling this the craziest match that he had ever played.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The FIDE World Cup is a knockout, starting with 128 players, with two games (90 min for 40 moves + 30 min for the rest, with 30 seconds increment) between pairs of players. The tiebreaks consist of two rapid games (25 min + 10 sec), then two accelerated games (10 min + 10 sec), and finally an Armageddon. The winner and the runner-up of the World Cup 2013 will qualify for the Candidates Tournament of the next World Championship cycle. The venue is the city of Tromsø, which lies in the northern-most region of Norway, almost 400 km inside the Arctic Circle. You can find all details and links to many ChessBase articles on Tromsø here. The World Cup starts on Sunday, August 11th and lasts until September 3rd (tiebreaks, closing ceremony). Each round lasts three days, while the final will consist of four classical games. Thursday August 29 is a free day. A detailed schedule can be found here.

Round four tiebreaks

It was an epic round of tiebreaks deciding the fate of eight players, and again it was more about guts and glory than Elo and name.

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Le, Quang Liem 2702
½
½
½
0
1.5
Svidler, Peter 2746
½
½
½
1
2.5

Quang Liem Le (left in the pictures) had done his job by holding six-time Russian champion Peter Svidler to two draws in their classical games, but the rapids turned out to be too much. The first was a Gruenfeld Exchange, and things soon looked very bad for Svidler as the Vietnamese player accrued a huge advantage. A crucial misstep (31.Bxg5? instead of 31.hxg5!) allowed the Russian back into the game and they eventually drew. In game two, they repeated the same Slav as in their second classical game, though this time Svidler was better prepared and he maintained a pull throughout. The endgame was a technical tour de force as he spent over 100 moves trying to win an endgame in which he had a bishop and knight against Le’s rook and pawn, but win he did, and he is through to the next round. This game is well worth replaying:

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2013"] [Site "Tromso NOR"] [Date "2013.08.22"] [Round "4.4"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Le, Quang Liem"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D10"] [WhiteElo "2746"] [BlackElo "2702"] [PlyCount "269"] [EventDate "2013.08.11"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Bf4 Nc6 6. e3 Bf5 7. Qb3 Na5 8. Qa4+ Bd7 9. Qc2 Rc8 10. Bd3 e6 11. Nf3 Be7 12. h3 O-O 13. O-O Nc4 14. Ne5 Bc6 15. Rac1 Nd6 16. Qb3 Qa5 17. Rc2 Rfd8 18. Nxc6 Rxc6 19. Rfc1 h6 20. a3 Nfe8 21. Qb4 Qxb4 22. axb4 Nc4 23. b5 Rcc8 24. Na4 Ned6 25. b3 Na5 26. Rxc8 Rxc8 27. Rc5 Nxb3 28. Bxd6 Nxc5 29. Bxc5 Bf8 30. Bxf8 Kxf8 31. Nc5 Rc7 32. Kf1 b6 33. Na6 Rc1+ 34. Ke2 Ke7 35. Nb4 Kd6 36. h4 g5 37. hxg5 hxg5 38. f4 gxf4 39. exf4 f5 40. Nc2 Rb1 41. Ne1 Rb2+ 42. Ke3 Ke7 43. Be2 Rb3+ 44. Kf2 Kd6 45. Nf3 Rb4 46. g3 Rb3 47. Ne5 Rb2 48. g4 fxg4 49. Nxg4 Rb3 50. Ne5 Rb2 51. Ke3 Rb1 52. Bd3 Re1+ 53. Kd2 Rh1 54. f5 exf5 55. Bxf5 Rh2+ 56. Kc3 Rh1 57. Bd3 Rc1+ 58. Kd2 Rh1 59. Nf3 Rh8 60. Ne1 Rh2+ 61. Kc3 Rh3 62. Nc2 Rg3 63. Kd2 Rg2+ 64. Be2 Rf2 65. Ne3 Rf4 66. Kd3 Rf2 67. Bh5 Rb2 68. Be8 Rb3+ 69. Kd2 Rb4 70. Kc3 Ra4 71. Kb3 Ra5 72. Bc6 a6 73. Kb4 Ra1 74. Bxd5 axb5 75. Bb3 Rb1 76. Nd1 Kd7 77. Nc3 Rh1 78. Nxb5 Rh4 79. Bd5 Rh2 80. Kc3 Rf2 81. Kd3 Rh2 82. Bb7 Rb2 83. Kc4 Ke6 84. Bc8+ Ke7 85. Bf5 Rf2 86. Be4 Ke6 87. Nc3 Kd6 88. Bd5 Rc2 89. Be4 Rc1 90. Kd3 Rg1 91. Nb5+ Ke6 92. Bc6 Rc1 93. Bf3 Rg1 94. Na3 Ra1 95. Nc4 b5 96. Nd2 Ra3+ 97. Ke4 Kd6 98. Bd1 Rh3 99. Bb3 Rh4+ 100. Kd3 Rh3+ 101. Kc2 Rh4 102. Kd3 Rh3+ 103. Ke2 Rh2+ 104. Ke3 Rh3+ 105. Nf3 Rh1 106. Ng5 Rh5 107. Ne4+ Kc6 108. Be6 Rh1 109. d5+ Kb6 110. Kd4 Rd1+ 111. Ke5 b4 112. d6 Kc6 113. Bb3 Re1 114. Ba4+ Kb6 115. Kd5 Rh1 116. Nf6 Rh3 117. Nd7+ Ka5 118. Nc5 b3 119. d7 Rh5+ 120. Kc4 Rh4+ 121. Kxb3 Rd4 122. Kc3 Rd5 123. Kc4 Rxd7 124. Bxd7 Kb6 125. Ne6 Ka5 126. Kc5 Ka6 127. Bc6 Ka5 128. Nd4 Ka6 129. Nb5 Ka5 130. Nd6 Ka6 131. Bb5+ Ka7 132. Kc6 Kb8 133. Kb6 Ka8 134. Ba6 Kb8 135. Nc4 1-0

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Andreikin, Dmitry 2716
½
½
1
1
3.0
Karjakin, Sergey 2772
½
½
0
0
1.0

Reigning Russian Champion Dmitry Andreikin (left) knew he had a mountain to climb facing his much higher rated compatriot Sergey Karjakin. Game one was a Torre in which Andreikin, as white, played a very straightforward plan, seizing advanced central squares and then pushing his kingside pawns for the attack. Sergey failed to neutralize the push or develop counterchances and Dmitry soon broke through in 32 moves. Game two meant Karjakin had a must-win situation on his hands and Andreikin went for a French Defense as his means to secure his ticket. His choice paid off as Sergey was unable to make anything of the position and, understanding he had nothing to lose, Karjakin took desperate measures that failed to pay off and he lost.

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Vachier-Lagrave, M 2719
½
½
1
½
2.5
Gelfand, Boris 2764
½
½
0
½
1.5

The match between French GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave and Boris Gelfand was quite different. In game one the world champion contender was all but won strategically as he strangled his younger opponent with passed pawns and square denial. The Israeli’s patience or judgment failed him though, and instead of working his advantage, he decided it was time to break open the position for an attack. There was nothing decisive and the manoeuvre simply gave life to White’s paralyzed pieces. Gelfand lost control of the position and lost. In game two, he fought hard and long to try and reset the balance, but failing to break Vachier-Lagrave’s spirit was unable to save the match.

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 Pts
Morozevich, Alex. 2739
½
½
½
½
1
0
0
½
3.5
Tomashevsky, Ev. 2706
½
½
½
½
0
1
1
½
4.5

The longest match by far was the epic battle between Evgeny Tomashevsky (left) and Alexander Morozevich. It was not simply epic due to its length, but the fantastic fighting spirit displayed by both players. In game one of their rapid, despite the opposite colored bishops and symmetrical pawns, the two GMs duked it out for a full 65 moves before shaking hands. Game two was much less clear as Morozevich missed many chances to stake his claim, including 24.Ng6! which would have won the queen for rook and piece. Tomashevsky held his grit and finally drew on move 59.

Then came the ten-minute rapid/blitz games and game one saw Morozevich take the upper hand after suffering throughout the game, only to enjoy a blunder at the end decide it in his favor. This meant Tomashevsky needed a win in game two to stay alive in the match, and nothing seemed further from reality. After 40 moves, it seemed as if Evgeny had no chance at all to win, and after 30 more moves and quite a bit of shuffling around, the question was what he planned to do to try and shake things up. All his attempts seemed doomed to fail. And yet finally he managed to throw in his dream break, and a further series of exchanges seemed to merely forestall the inevitable draw. Both players had long used up all their time and were playing solely off the increments, which was where the practical chances lay. Tomashevksy would not be denied and after 169 moves, he had won his miracle marathon. You really need to play through this nail-biting marathon encounter.

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2013"] [Site "Tromso NOR"] [Date "2013.08.22"] [Round "4.6"] [White "Morozevich, Alexander"] [Black "Tomashevsky, Evgeny"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B13"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [BlackElo "2706"] [PlyCount "338"] [EventDate "2013.08.11"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. Bd3 Nc6 5. c3 g6 6. Nf3 Bf5 7. Bxf5 gxf5 8. Bg5 Bg7 9. Qd3 Qd7 10. Nbd2 Nf6 11. Bxf6 Bxf6 12. O-O-O O-O-O 13. Nb3 e6 14. Nc5 Qc7 15. Qe2 Kb8 16. Kb1 Ne7 17. Nd3 Nc8 18. Nfe5 h5 19. g3 Nd6 20. f3 Ka8 21. Rhe1 Rb8 22. Nf4 Bg5 23. Nfd3 Rbc8 24. h4 Bf6 25. Nf4 Rcg8 26. Rg1 a6 27. Rde1 Re8 28. Ka1 Ka7 29. Rc1 Rc8 30. Rge1 Bg7 31. Rcd1 Qb6 32. Qc2 Qc7 33. Qe2 Rcg8 34. Rg1 Bf6 35. Rde1 Rg7 36. Qf2 Ka8 37. Qe2 Ka7 38. Qf2 Nc4 39. Nxc4 Qxc4 40. Qd2 Be7 41. Nd3 Bd6 42. Ne5 Qc7 43. f4 Rhg8 44. Qf2 Bxe5 45. Rxe5 b5 46. a3 a5 47. Re3 Rb8 48. Qf3 Rh7 49. Kb1 Rhh8 50. Rc1 Rb6 51. Rc2 Kb8 52. Qe2 Kc8 53. b3 Kd7 54. Kb2 Ke7 55. Rd3 Qa7 56. Qe5 f6 57. Qe2 Kf7 58. Re3 Qd7 59. Rc1 Kg6 60. Re1 Re8 61. Ka2 Kh6 62. Kb2 Qc6 63. Qd3 Qb7 64. Qe2 Qd7 65. Ka2 Rd6 66. Kb2 Qc6 67. Ka2 Qb6 68. Qd2 Rc8 69. Kb2 Rcc6 70. R1e2 Qa6 71. Qe1 Qc8 72. Qd2 Ra6 73. Qe1 Rdb6 74. Qd2 Rb7 75. Qe1 Re7 76. Qd2 Kg6 77. Qe1 Rc6 78. Rc2 b4 79. a4 Rec7 80. Qd2 Qa6 81. Rc1 Qb7 82. Rd3 Qc8 83. Re3 Qa6 84. Rf3 Qb6 85. Rd3 Qa7 86. Rf3 Qb8 87. Re3 Kf7 88. c4 dxc4 89. bxc4 Rxc4 90. Rxc4 Rxc4 91. d5 Re4 92. dxe6+ Kxe6 93. Rd3 Qc7 94. Qd1 Qc6 95. Qb3+ Ke7 96. Qd1 Qe6 97. Rd2 Re3 98. Qc2 Kf7 99. Rd3 Re2 100. Rd2 Rxd2 101. Qxd2 Qc6 102. Qd3 Ke6 103. Qe2+ Kd6 104. Qd3+ Qd5 105. Qa6+ Kd7 106. Qa7+ Ke6 107. Qb6+ Kf7 108. Qc7+ Kg6 109. Qc8 Qd2+ 110. Kb1 Qd3+ 111. Kb2 Qa3+ 112. Kb1 Qb3+ 113. Kc1 Qd5 114. Kb2 Kf7 115. Qc7+ Ke8 116. Qc8+ Ke7 117. Qc7+ Ke6 118. Qb6+ Qd6 119. Qe3+ Kd7 120. Qa7+ Qc7 121. Qd4+ Ke6 122. Qe3+ Kf7 123. Qd3 Ke7 124. Qe3+ Kf8 125. Qd4 Kg7 126. Qe3 Qb7 127. Qe2 Qc6 128. Qe7+ Kg6 129. Qd8 Qc3+ 130. Kb1 Qb3+ 131. Kc1 Qc4+ 132. Kb2 Qe6 133. Qxa5 Qe2+ 134. Kb3 Qe3+ 135. Kxb4 Qxg3 136. Qc7 Qxh4 137. a5 Qe1+ 138. Kb5 Qb1+ 139. Kc5 Qc2+ 140. Kd6 Qd3+ 141. Ke7 h4 142. Kf8 Kh5 143. Kg7 h3 144. Kxf6 Kg4 145. Qg7+ Kf3 146. Qb7+ Qe4 147. a6 h2 148. Qxe4+ fxe4 149. a7 h1=Q 150. a8=Q Qh6+ 151. Ke7 Qxf4 152. Qd5 Kg3 153. Qg8+ Qg4 154. Qb8+ Kf3 155. Qh2 e3 156. Qh1+ Kf2 157. Qh2+ Qg2 158. Qf4+ Qf3 159. Qh4+ Kf1 160. Qc4+ e2 161. Kd8 Qf5 162. Kc7 Kf2 163. Qh4+ Ke3 164. Qe1 Qc2+ 165. Kb8 Qb3+ 166. Ka7 Kd3 167. Qg3+ Kc2 168. Qe1 Qe3+ 169. Ka6 Qd2 0-1

This meant that the match would now go into the blitz phase with two last chances for the players to decide their fates before the Armageddon game.

Game one showed that Tomashevsky’s resilience was taking its toll as Morozevich was unable to gain anything in a Caro-Kann Advance, and eventually Evgeny won, which left Morozevich in a must-win situation. It turned out to be too much to ask for, and Moro found himself lost straight from the opening. Whether out of sporting play, or pure nerves, Tomashevsky repeated moves instead of delivering a mate in one. It made no difference of course as he had qualified to the next phase. An utterly exhausted Evgeny Tomashevsky joined live commentators GM Susan Polgar and IM Lawrence Trent describing the ordeal as “the craziest match I have ever played” in a voice that still trembled slightly from nerves and adrenaline.

Pictures provided by Paul Truong, whom you can see at work on the right above

All results of the fourth round games

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Morozevich, Alex. 2739
½
½
½
½
1
0
0
½
  3.5
Tomashevsky, Ev. 2706
½
½
½
½
0
1
1
½
  4.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Caruana, Fabiano 2796
1
1
              2.0
Granda, Julio 2664
0
0
              0.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Ivanchuk, Vassily 2731
0
½
              0.5
Kramnik, Vladimir 2784
1
½
              1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Le, Quang Liem 2702
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Svidler, Peter 2746
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Andreikin, Dmitry 2716
½
½
1
1
          3.0
Karjakin, Sergey 2772
½
½
0
0
          1.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Nakamura, Hikaru 2772
½
0
              0.5
Korobov, Anton 2720
½
1
              1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Vachier-Lagrave, M 2719
½
½
1
½
          2.5
Gelfand, Boris 2764
½
½
0
½
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Kamsky, Gata 2741
1
½
              1.5
Mamedyarov, S. 2775
0
½
              0.5

Replay all games of the round

Select games from the dropdown menu above the board

Video reports from Tromsø


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Topics Tromso, World Cup
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register